Pete Antoniewicz

Pete Antoniewicz

Pete Antoniewicz is an industrial content writer at Water Online, where he draws on his journalism degree and experience writing for a variety of industrial and high-tech companies. He can be reached at pantoniewicz @ wateronline.com.

ARTICLES BY PETE ANTONIEWICZ

  • Trenchless Technology Poised To Advance Infrastructure Resiliency

    As one of many ripple effects of COVID-19, capital investment in water and wastewater infrastructure is expected to see some setbacks due to reductions in revenue and cash flow during the pandemic. But a recent report highlights a brighter picture for the growth of trenchless technology in pipeline repair expenditures, thanks to its cost-effective approach for meeting pent-up demand.

  • Data Science Aids Lead-Service-Line Inventory And Replacement Programs

    A white paper recently released by the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators (ASDWA) provides insights on how water utilities can better use data to manage uncertainty around remaining lead-service-line (LSL) customer connections. The document represents the organization’s commitment to making information accessible to assist state program administrators in protecting public health.

  • Taking Stock Of The Value In Distributed Water Infrastructure

    In the spirit of ‘never let a good crisis go to waste,’ a recent addition to the Pacific Institute website calls attention to the merits of distributed water infrastructure as a practical response to financial challenges caused by the COVID-19 crisis and other such financially stressful events. This overview includes links to strategic and tactical references to help water-utility decision-makers improve their resiliency.

  • A Good Time To Reassess Utility Resiliency

    The Water Information Sharing and Analysis Center (WaterISAC) is reminding water utilities that September is National Preparedness Month in an effort to focus attention on steps they can take to improve resiliency and be prepared for a variety of challenges to their continuity of operations. Here are some industry guidelines and valuable links to help that happen.

  • Adapting To The 'New Normal' In A Post-COVID Water Sector

    Beyond all the health-related impacts of the coronavirus pandemic, there have been some ripple effects to the daily operations and related employment conditions for water-treatment personnel. Here is a recap of some of those issues, their impacts, and alternatives for water-utility management.

  • Proposed Defense Bill Includes Improved Focus On PFAS Control

    The U.S. House of Representatives’ version of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2021 (H.R. 6395) includes some positive developments for communities and community water systems impacted by contamination from per- and polyfluorinated substances (PFAS) used at nearby Department of Defense (DoD) installations. Here are some insights on potential benefits for water consumers in those areas.

  • Packaged Wastewater Treatment: A Recipe For Success

    Food and beverage wastewater treatment demands often fluctuate more drastically than municipal wastewater applications in terms of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) relating to the foods being processed or to cyclical activity. Modular, self-contained systems offer practical, cost-effective solutions to help food processors keep pace with such variability — as a total or supplemental solution. Here’s how.

  • Water Industry Responds To Proposed LCR Revisions

    With more than 50,000 community water systems (CWS) in the U.S., it is amazing that only 285 individuals had logged public comments on the U.S. EPA’s proposed Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) Revisions by the February 12, 2020 deadline. Yet, what those respondents had to say could have a big impact on how we deal with lead in drinking water moving forward. Here is a cross-section of the industry’s response.

  • 50+ Links To Assist Small, Stressed Water Utilities

    While any drinking water or wastewater treatment operation can be challenged by demands from changing seasonal conditions or regulatory requirements, those pressures can quickly compound for personnel forced to wear multiple hats at small- to medium-sized utilities. Here are scores of links to helpful resources for such operators for the municipalities and consulting engineers who work with them.

  • LCR Revisions: Speak Now, Or Forever Hold Your Peace

    Are you completely ready to implement the scores of changes in the U.S. EPA’s Lead and Copper Rule Revisions (LCRR), exactly as proposed? If not, act quickly, because time to register constructive feedback before the February 12th deadline is running out. Less than three weeks before the end of the comment period, the EPA’s webpage for feedback displayed only 131 public submissions regarding the proposed regulations.

  • Understanding PFAS’ Impact On Remediation Strategies

    For more than 16.5 million water-utility customers in 33 different states, contamination caused by per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) is a source-water issue that will not go away for a long time. What are the practical options for community water systems currently confronting this challenge? Here is an overview of several treatments and their relative successes against a wide variety of PFAS compounds.

  • Preparing To Tackle The Hydra Of LCR Revisions

    As a journalist serving the water industry — but not yet a seasoned technical veteran — I attended a recent Lead In Drinking Water Forum sponsored by AWWA NJ to learn about the challenges of complying with the proposed Lead and Copper Rule Revisions (LCRR). What I heard impressed upon me the technical, administrative, and logistical challenges of delivering safe, lead-free drinking water all the way to user taps. Here are my takeaways.

  • Understanding And Coping With Struvite/Vivianite Formation In WWTPs

    Based on wastewater properties, various types of mineral buildup can affect wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) piping. With their impacts on plant energy efficiency and potential restriction of throughput capacity, keeping pipes free-flowing is an important aspect of WWTP operations. Here’s guidance for coping with two common problems associated with phosphorus concentrations in wastewater — struvite and vivianite.

  • Trouble In Paradise, And A Plan To Alleviate It

    While San Diego has a reputation for beautiful weather in a sunny seaside setting, its growing population in the southernmost area of rain-starved California is a recipe for trouble in paradise. That challenge has spurred the creation of Pure Water San Diego — a multi-phase, multi-year program with the goal of using recycled water for up to one-third of San Diego’s water supply by the year 2035.

  • Engineering The Success Of Your Next Infrastructure Project

    Whether your water utility is challenged with increasingly stringent standards, implementing new technology, or coping with aging infrastructure replacement, new project implementation concerns can be daunting. Take advantage of proven practices from experienced water industry professionals to put your project on the right track with sound evaluation of engineering assistance for your project.

  • Operator Certification Training: Hope For The Future Of Water

    As the anticipated retirements of an aging utility workforce are raising concerns among water utilities nationwide, the issue of attracting, training, and retaining qualified replacements grows more urgent. To help water industry managers, employees, and prospective employees protect the public welfare, the industry offers a variety of certification guidance and assistance to get utilities where they need to be.

  • Industry Gut-Check: How’s Your Utility Workforce?

    In discussions with water industry suppliers and service organizations, the topic of a changing (i.e., aging) water workforce comes up quite frequently. Just how serious of a concern is it? How much of a threat does it pose to output quality and ongoing regulatory compliance at water treatment and wastewater treatment plants (WTPs/WWTPs) in the near future? Most important, what can be done to improve the situation?

  • Getting Serious About Lead Service Line Replacement

    It has been 32 years since the amended Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) banned the installation of lead pipes in water systems nationwide. Unfortunately, that decision has not yet translated into action for every lead service line (LSL) installed before that point. Fortunately, someone has done a lot of legwork toward getting a handle on that process. Here is a preview of the help they have to offer.

  • Coping With Mixed-Source Water Quality And Corrosion Challenges

    When it becomes necessary to expand or blend water supply sources, variety is not necessarily the spice of life. Whether new water sources are surface water or groundwater, fresh, brackish, seawater, or water recovered from aquifer storage, they can ultimately impact water treatment plant (WTP) operations and finished water quality — including compliance with the U.S. EPA Lead and Copper Rule.

  • How To Become More Successful At Funding Water Infrastructure

    Prioritizing and funding pressing infrastructure needs can be challenging for water treatment and wastewater treatment plants (WTPs/WWTPs) of any size. The problems are particularly stressful for smaller utilities where a thin layer of upper management staff wears an inordinate number of hats. The good news is that funding assistance does exist — if you know where to look for it and take the right steps to apply for it.

  • USGS Shares Wellspring Of Insight On Groundwater Trends

    If your customer base is among the 140 million people who depend upon groundwater for drinking water, irrigation, or agriculture, it is important to know whether you can expect the quality of your source water today to be the same tomorrow. Fortunately, a recent update to the first-of-its-kind assessment of trends in groundwater supply has been announced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to help you identify emerging problems. The results are detailed in an informative and easy-to-use interactive map.

  • Design-Build: Cyclical Trend Or Step Change?

    Over the past two decades, the trend from traditional design-bid-build (DBB) construction project-delivery practices to design-build (DB) practices has grown. Is that merely a cyclical trend or a step change that is destined to be a fixture for a long time to come?

  • The Value Of Conducting An M36 Water Audit

    Despite my fascination with the adage, “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting a different result,” I still occasionally find myself — a creature of habit — falling into a pattern of repetitive unsuccessful behavior.

  • My Most Personal Initiation To PFAS

    When I attended the U.S. EPA-hosted PFAS Summit held at the Horsham, PA high school auditorium on July 25, 2018, the education I received from state and municipal leaders focusing on the local problem was more than just a professional briefing. It was ominously personal, due to the fact that the Water Online editorial office where I work and drink water every day is served by a utility sitting smack-dab in the middle of one of the most concentrated PFAS hotspots in the U.S.

  • Blue-Collar Heroes: Helping Smaller Rural Water Systems Flourish

    While all water treatment utilities (WTPs) and wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) face challenges, small rural systems are particularly hard-pressed due to limited resources. In a contrast of proportions, small water systems supporting fewer than 3,500 customers serve about 8 percent of the U.S. population, yet constitute nearly 83 percent of nation’s 51,000 community water systems. Sixty-five percent of those small systems serve 500 customers or less, and many of them are rural systems. Fortunately, they do not have to face their challenges alone.

  • Great Lakes Competition Rewards Environmental Stewardship

    The Great Lakes Basin Water Utility Energy Challenge has announced five winners in its inaugural competition among water utilities to reduce emissions associated with energy generation to support their plant operations. The 2018 winners included a variety of utilities ranging from small-town to large-metropolitan-area systems, competing in five major areas:

  • Is There A Cure For Wastewater’s Summertime Blues?

    As we approach the hottest months of the year, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) operators face a range of challenges arising from elevated summer temperatures. With all due respect to Eddie Cochran, this article outlines some of the cures — or at least preventive steps and countermeasures — for wastewater treatment’s “summertime blues.”

  • Play It Again, Sam: Potable Water Reuse Striking New Chords

    The phrase “Necessity is the mother of invention” has been definitively traced back to early 16th century England, and even attributed to Plato in the Latin form, “Mater artium necessitas.” In today’s world of water, necessity is also becoming a major factor in rising interest regarding potable water reuse. This is especially true in areas where changes in climate or usage demands have stressed traditional sources of supply, as evidenced by increasing numbers of applications worldwide. For those who work in a water-stressed environment, this article can provide added perspective on specific points of opportunity — and points of caution.

  • Mapping A New Future For Water Main Break Prediction

    Every water distribution utility has a strategy for infrastructure asset management and repair — from simply reacting to breaks, to scheduling main replacements based on system-specific history, to prioritizing infrastructure repairs based on mathematical calculations of risks and consequences.

  • West Coast WTPs: Beware Of Intruders On Your Doorstep

    As if they don’t already face enough challenges, water treatment plants (WTPs) in the western U.S. have yet another potential problem lurking in their source water waiting to blossom when they least expect it. This specific problem comes in the form of two invasive species: quagga mussels and zebra mussels.