WASTEWATER REGULATIONS AND LEGISLATION RESOURCES

  • This prominent Napa Count vineyard and winery received a prestigious green certification after committing itself to sustainable and environmentally-friendly technologies and practices, including the installation of a dynamic MBR wastewater treatment system.

  • Xylem introduces the latest innovation for clarification: the Leopold Texler lamella clarifier. Texler’s inclined lamella settler increases the effective clarification area. This reduces the required space by 80% compared to conventional rectangular clarifiers and allows for water flow to be increased within the same small footprint.

  • Prior to the installation of the Duperon Self-Cleaning Trashrack at their intakes, the City of Dallas Hampton Road Pump Station operated without any protection in front of their stormwater grating. “We just had a grate in front with no mechanical cleaning,” remembers Dhruv Pandya, District Manager for the City of Dallas Department of Flood Control. “The pumps were suffering. They were continually getting clogged, and they didn’t have enough water coming in to function properly.”

  • Darey Hjelmeland, Plant Supervisor for the Rural Municipality of Gimli, manages the processing of incoming septage, creating a challenging blend of influent that can include a wide variety of debris: heavy rags, rocks, clothing, metal, soda cans and bottles, and more. The plant has likely processed “just about anything you’d never want to drop into a portable toilet,” Hjelmeland shared.

  • Hydrogeneration is the dominant source of energy in New Zealand, providing approximately 70% of total electricity. The Hornwort, a submersed, free-floating perennial which can reach nearly 20 feet of height above water, has invaded New Zealand’s waters. The plant quickly proved to be an issue for Genesis Energy at the Tokaanu Power Station, a 240 MW hydroelectric power station.

  • The Wayne County Downriver WWTF in Wyandotte, Michigan, is a CSO facility servicing 13 area communities with an average flow of 40 MGD. For wet weather and storm events, the plant is rated for 225 MGD—second only to Detroit in the state of Michigan. The plant is home to seven screens: four used during everyday flow, and an additional three accessed primarily during storm events.

  • The City of Grand Rapids, Michigan Wastewater Treatment Plant has four channels with a design flow of 61.9MGD, and which routinely manage up to 90MGD during storm events. An on-site retention basin, designed for the wet weather the city frequently experiences, holds up to 10M gallons—which, during storm events, can mean a potential of 125MGD-135MGD through the screens.

  • Kansas City is a dynamic metropolis on the banks of the Missouri River, home to nearly half a million residents—and a constant stream of visitors coming to enjoy the world-class barbecue and music scene. All that activity puts steady pressure on the city’s water and wastewater infrastructure. KC Water is the utility charged with meeting those needs.

  • The Drake Pump Station, located in Saginaw, Michigan experienced chronic pump maintenance due to flushable wipes. Although the dry pit pump station represented only 0.1 million gallons per day (mgd) of flow in the city’s collection network, it required a substantial amount of servicing – up to three times a week. This consisted of two operators spending four hours manually removing rags in a confined space entry to clean out the clogged pump. It was a dirty, unplanned, and time-consuming task.

  • After spending decades and millions of dollars rehabilitating sewer pipes across its service area, a large coastal utility embarked on a pilot pipe condition assessment program for 25,000 linear feet in areas prone to high unwanted infiltration rates.

WASTEWATER SOLUTIONS

  • Storm King

    Prevent 100% of combined sewer floatables and gross solids and 95% of grit and sediment from reaching the environment.

  • Pressure Measurement

    Whether pressure, level or flow, today pressure measurement technology is often used for measuring liquids, pastes and gases. With a wide range of sensor technology Endress+Hauser offer instruments with perfect fit for any kind of application.

  • RTC101 P-Module Real-Time Phosphorus Control Solution

    Adjusting chemical dose based on flow or setting a fixed chemical dose can be very expensive. With a system that provides Real-Time Control, you can significantly lower chemical costs, quickly adjust for loading changes, and enjoy the peace of mind in knowing your effluent phosphorus levels are within permit range.

  • Thermatel® TA2 Mass Flow Transmitter

    The Thermatel® Model TA2 thermal mass flow transmitter, based on thermal dispersion technology, provides reliable mass measurement for air and gas flow applications.

  • OPTIMASS 3010 Coriolis Mass Flowmeter

    The OPTIMASS 3010 is a cost-effective Coriolis mass flowmeter for low flow and dosing applications with liquids and gases (from 0.3 kg/h or 0.01 lb/min upwards). The flowmeter features an integrated Modbus converter. This makes it the ideal solution for applications where a DCS or a PLC is already in use and extensive communication options and control functions are not necessary. By way of its Modbus interface the flowmeter integrates easily into existing controller systems. There is no need for a conventional signal converter. Purchase costs can be saved.

WASTEWATER VIDEOS

Xylem introduces the latest innovation for clarification: the Leopold Texler lamella clarifier. Texler’s inclined lamella settler increases the effective clarification area. This reduces the required space by 80% compared to conventional rectangular clarifiers and allows for water flow to be increased within the same small footprint.