DRINKING WATER FLOW CONTROL AND MEASUREMENT RESOURCES

  • More frequent capture of water supply and distribution data is becoming a must-have for utilities as they strive to build network resilience, improve customer experience, and meet regulatory expectations. Ovarro’s associate product line manager for RTUs & loggers, Adam Wright, shares insights into the latest developments.

  • In the summer of 2020, the Lowcountry Regional Water System in Hampton, South Carolina, had a customer located in an industrial park report a low water pressure issue. The company was a commercial laundry that served the hospitality industry and provided linens to hotels around the Hilton Head area. The low water pressure issue was causing the company’s heat recovery system to work improperly shortly before the July 4 holiday. In its first use of the AMERICAN Flow Control SEMPER™ Remote Pressure Monitor (RPM), Lowcountry Regional Water System deployed two units to resolve the issue. One device was located on the water system’s side of the meter and the other device was placed inside the company’s building, where water enters the facility at the backflow preventer.

  • Since the first Coriolis flow sensors were introduced to the marketplace in the 1970s, the technology has evolved considerably. As the installed base for Coriolis grew, the sensors were being called upon to deliver data in environments with increasing levels of complexity. This meant that Coriolis sensors had to adapt and conform to a dizzying array of ever-changing installation requirements, process conditions, communication formats, and configuration parameters. The following article highlights four key advances in Coriolis flow measurement’s journey from the 1970s to today.

  • In industry today, everyone is looking for ways to conserve a bit of energy and save some money. For instance, consider the energy consumption across the United States just in the water treatment process. With thousands of public water utilities, the amount of energy usage is significant.

  • The City of Durham is committed to providing safe drinking water to a service population of more than 289,000.  The City’s Department of Water Management (DWM) ensures the delivery of water to approximately 99,000 service connections through 1,400 miles of watermains. Lake Michie and Little River Reservoir are the two sources that deliver raw water to the City’s two treatment plants, using a combination of gravity flow and electric and hydro-powered pumping systems. Together, these plants have the combined treatment capacity of 64 million gallons per day (MGD) with an average demand is 28 MGD.

  • Gwinnett County is located 30 miles northeast of Atlanta. The County is investigating methods to improve its strategic program for water meters. These improvements include updated testing equipment, a wider selection of approved metering technologies, and increased employee training. The goal is to install the most appropriate meter for each specific use, and to enhance the county’s excellent customer service.

  • Water production and distribution in the City of Redlands, California, is managed by the Municipal Utilities & Engineering Department and is supplied from two water supplies, Mill Creek and the Santa Anna River. Treatment is provided at two conventional water treatment plants, Tate WTP and Hinckley WTP, each capable of producing approximately 14 MGD. Water is then fed into 7 different pressure zones due to elevation changes through a series of pump stations.

  • Distribution system water main breaks are a significant burden to communities and water systems not only due to disruption of water service to customers, but also due to significant economic burdens in the form of pipe replacement costs, excavation costs, and even insurance reimbursements. Read the full white paper to learn the KETOS Wave can be easily installed into existing PRVs to monitor the pressure and flow in the downstream side of the valve and proactively act in real-time as needed.

  • Trimble Telog® technology helps Plainfield Area Regional Sewerage Authority (PARSA) become proactive to emerging problems.

  • Level monitoring systems has successfully triumphed every implementation. Their deployments allow the users to measure the level of liquid stored in a container of any shape, size, orientation, or material. Powered with the advanced telemetric technology of Internet of Things, these systems measure liquid level without making any contact with the liquid and transmit the readings to a comprehensive platform suite.

DRINKING WATER FLOW CONTROL AND MEASUREMENT SOLUTIONS

  • ModMAG® M2000 Electromagnetic Flow Meters

    Combining a general-purpose detector with an amplifier, the ModMAG® M2000 electromagnetic flow meter features an advanced, user-friendly design that is built for field verification testing with the use of a simple, handheld device. It has a wide selection of liner and electrode materials to help ensure maximum compatibility and minimum maintenance over a long operating period.

  • Magnetic Flow Meters

    Interchangeable sensors and transmitters provide ideal flexibility for flow measurement.

  • Stratum PTC Purge And Trap Concentrator

    In 1974, Tekmar developed an idea that revolutionized the way laboratories performed Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) testing. Since then, Tekmar has continued to build on the foundation of the initial Purge and Trap technique one innovative layer at a time. The Stratum PTC builds on eight previous generations, making us the industry’s cornerstone of technique and support.

  • POWERFLUX 4300 Electromagnetic Flowmeter

    The POWERFLUX 4300 is an electromagnetic flowmeter specifically designed for applications with electrically conductive liquids in the nuclear industry. It comes with a compact or remote digital signal converter and a radiation hardened sensor. The sensor features a chemically resistant PFA or ETFE liner material. All construction materials of the flowmeter are selected and tested to meet the high demands of the nuclear industry. This way, the rugged flowmeter withstands the most hostile and demanding environments of nuclear applications (e.g. with borated water). The flowmeter offers extensive diagnostics for maximum reliability and comes with various digital communication options.

  • OPTIFLUX 2100 Electromagnetic Flowmeter

    The OPTIFLUX 2100 is an electromagnetic flowmeter (EMF) for standard water and wastewater applications. It is the ideal solution for all general flow applications where reliable flow measurement with sufficient yet not extremely high accuracy is required. Installation in measurement chambers subject to (constant) flooding is possible with the remote IP68 / NEMA 6P rated version.

DRINKING WATER FLOW CONTROL AND MEASUREMENT VIDEOS

Leveraging Industrial loT, powerful mapping and data visualizations as well as advanced analytics, Mueller is expanding the capabilities of America's most popular fire hydrant with the new Sentryx™ Software Enabled Super Centurion® Hydrant.