WATER SCARCITY RESOURCES

  • In the spring of 2019, U.S. government-funded research on watersheds revealed a dire outlook for the future of water availability in the United States. Between population growth and climate change, the study reports that “serious water shortages'' are likely to occur within the next 55 years.

  • Groundwater resources currently supply drinking water to nearly half the world’s population and roughly 40 percent of water used for irrigation globally. What many people don’t realize is how old — and how vulnerable — much of that water is.

  • The 2021 water year ends on Sept. 30, and it was another hot, dry year in the western U.S., with almost the entire region in drought. Reservoirs vital for farms, communities and hydropower have fallen to dangerous lows. The biggest blow came in August, when the U.S. government issued its first ever water shortage declaration for the Colorado River, triggering water use restrictions. In response, farmers and cities across the Southwest are now finding new, often unsustainable ways to meet their future water needs.

  • As Denver Water looks to increase water security, a slice of its supply could be stored deep below the city.

  • Water is the source of life on our planet and an essential resource for agriculture. Agriculture accounts for 70 percent of the consumption of this resource. At the same time, water is not endless and many regions today suffer from an acute shortage.

  • The Colorado River at Kremmling in Grand County will enjoy a big bump in flows from August into October as Denver Water pays off a hefty water debt. The rising flows serve as a good example of how Colorado’s intricate system of water rights can drive river flows higher when they might typically be lower as autumn settles in.

  • The United States and Mexico are tussling over their dwindling shared water supplies after years of unprecedented heat and insufficient rainfall. Sustained drought on the middle-lower Rio Grande since the mid-1990s means less Mexican water flows to the U.S. The Colorado River Basin, which supplies seven U.S. states and two Mexican states, is also at record low levels.

  • How monitoring facility water use can help corporations bridge the gap between water intentions and results.

  • “Water, water, every where, / Nor any drop to drink”
    These all too familiar lines from the poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge seem to be ringing too close to home as water becomes an increasingly scarce resource with every passing day.

  • Smart cities technologist Peter Williams and Aquify – An Exelon company have released a new white paper on water scarcity and the solutions water utilities can implement to help stem the tide on the trillions of gallons lost to underground leaks. 

WATER SCARCITY PRODUCTS

  • Potable Water Treatment Mini Train System: PWT 125

    For remote sites with peak populations between 500 and 2,000 people, the newterra PWT-125 Mini Train System offers exceptional capacity and flexibility. The base system for up to 500 people consists of two 40' containerized elements – a discrete distribution/disinfection unit and a treatment unit. The Mini Train design allows up to four (4) treatment units to be added to a single distribution unit, providing potable water treatment for 2,000 people. The system is designed to integrate with containerized or free standing tanks for water storage. The treatment system is available for both groundwater and surface water sources.

  • Potable Water Storage Unit: MSU-40

    Minimize potable water hauling costs with modular onsite storage units from newterra – the leader in advanced camp water solutions.

  • Sewage Treatment Mini Train System: WWT-50

    The highly scalable newterra WWT-50 Sewage Treatment Mini Train System is designed for rapid mobilization to serve camps of 200 to 800 people. These efficient plants are configured in trains that allow modular expansion and easy redeployment of assets. Each base configuration consists of two 40' containers that provide 50 m3 (13,200 US gal) of treatment capacity – enough for 200 people. Supplementing the base system with one 40' Adder container doubles capacity to 100 m3 for up to 400 people.

  • Sewage Treatment Large Train System: WWT-125

    The newterra WWT-125 is a scalable sewage treatment plant based on 3-container process trains that can each address the requirements of 500 people (125 m3; 33,000 US gal). The advanced, modular system is designed for larger camps with populations ranging from 1,000 to tens of thousands of people. A base system consists of five 40' containers: a Screen/Master Control unit, a three-unit Process train (one Equalization container, one Aeration container, and one Membrane container), and a Sludge Management unit. The Screen/Master Control & Sludge Management units can support up to four Process trains.

  • Process Instrumentation And Analytics Solutions For Water And Wastewater

    Supplying drinking water to the population and treating wastewater are two very important global challenges. On a daily basis, system planners, designers and operators are required to keep the global increase in water consumption under control in the face of growing water shortages and the salination of fresh water resources. As industry experts for water applications, we offer powerful, innovative technical solutions to assist you.

WATER SCARCITY VIDEOS

Austin Alexander leads Sustainability at Xylem.