SOURCE WATER RESOURCES

  • Millions of gallons of water laced with fertilizer ingredients are being pumped into Florida’s Tampa Bay from a leaking reservoir at an abandoned phosphate plant at Piney Point. As the water spreads into the bay, it carries phosphorus and nitrogen — nutrients that under the right conditions can fuel dangerous algae blooms that can suffocate sea grass beds and kill fish, dolphins and manatees.

  • Microplastics, small plastic particles with sizes ranging from 5 millimeters to 1 nanometer with various morphologies such as microfibers, fragments, pellets (nurdles), or microbeads, have received increasing attention, including upcoming statewide monitoring in California.

  • Bristol Water provides clean, fresh drinking water every day to approximately 1.2 million people in the city of Bristol and surrounding areas in the west of England. As part of taking inventory on ways to improve its service, Bristol Water undertook its largest ever program of customer engagement. This invited customers to participate in the decisions Bristol Water makes about the future of their water services.

  • Surface waters – such as rivers, streams, lakes, reservoirs, estuaries, and coastal waters – are the primary types of aquatic resources that people interact with daily. As the global population continues to grow, demand increases for water resources. Scientists have long collaborated with government and local agencies to help manage these aquatic systems, and increasingly, researchers have been emphasizing the importance of treating our waterways as social-ecological systems. This view of systems recognizes the interconnected and resilient relationships between humans and nature. Understanding how individuals can positively interact and respond to water bodies over long periods of time would better support the sustainable management of aquatic resources.

  • This past week President Biden unveiled his American Jobs Plan, proposing a nearly $2.3 trillion investment in our national infrastructure. Does this bold plan do enough for rivers?

  • A staggering four billion people — two-thirds of the world’s population — experience water scarcity each year, and more than half lack access to safe sanitation services. The severity of this global water crisis will only increase as populations continue to rapidly grow, industries exhaust shared resources and extreme weather events exacerbate shortages. If we don’t act urgently, 700 million people could be displaced by intense water scarcity in just a few short years.

  • The Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) addresses regional water issues serving more than 2.2 million residents in Southern Nevada. Including in its scope of responsibility, SNWA manages the Searchlight water treatment and distribution system which services Searchlight, Nevada. 

  • Large, distributed water networks are not well-suited for conventional water monitoring processes which rely on manual sampling and lab testing. In particular, this midstream oil and gas company had a need to detect Iron, Selenium, and other heavy metals at a precise level comparable to a lab. In addition, it wasn’t feasible to manually test the entire water system at the requisite frequency. Finally, instrument reliability and unplanned downtime were an issue.

  • A microbrewery utilizing groundwater as one of the water sources in the brewing process had difficulty receiving permits. A full lifecycle remediation and monitoring process needed to be in place to receive permits. 

  • A private company that provides water via privately-owned-and-operated well fields with enough annual water supply to provide sustainable drinking water to more than 200,000 people faced a number of sampling, testing, and monitoring challenges. Lab tests and environmental monitoring costs were high and the data collected was not easily integrated with their SCADA system.

DRINKING WATER SOLUTIONS

  • WATERTRAK™ Light Industrial Reverse Osmosis The LRL Series is a truly engineered system. From pretreatment through RO tank level and posttreatment, the LRL RO family becomes a “system” by simply activating standard features.
  • ReFlex™ Reverse Osmosis

    Desalitech's ReFlex Reverse Osmosis systems represent a new era of water treatment efficiency. With patented CCD technology, ReFlex systems guarantee maximum water savings and waste water reduction. Desalitech systems are making the best use of water resources, offering a recovery rate of up to 98 percent plus unmatched reliability and flexibility. ReFlex Reverse Osmosis typically reduces disposal costs by 50 percent to 75 percent and energy consumption by up to 35 percent.

  • NeoTech D322™

    The NeoTech D322™ is specially designed to disinfect water and is an essential component in advanced oxidation processes.

  • Accurately Measuring Network Leakage

    The pressures of supplying a growing global population mean that the world’s water supplies need to be managed more closely than ever.

  • MoTreat: Mobile Water Pre-Treatment System MoTreat provides a mobile solution to treat flowback and produced water on-site at the well pad area to yield water with minimal total suspended solids (TSS) which enables recycle and reuse without the need for costly trucking to off-site treatment facilities.
  • TOC Reduction

    NeoTech Aqua Solutions provides the most efficient and cost-effective UV systems for destroying Total Organic Carbons (TOC’s) in water.  Whether your destroying NDMA, 1,4-dioxane, TCE, MTBE, urea, endocrine disruptors or other organics, only NeoTech Aqua provides ultraviolet TOC reduction with a treatment chamber optimized for low pressure mercury lamps.  As a result, NeoTech Aqua’s UV systems achieve a three times greater TOC reduction per kilowatt compared to standard UV systems, reducing our clients’ costs and energy consumption. In addition to efficiently generating ample 185 nm UV for TOC reduction, NeoTech Aqua’s TOC reduction systems also generate significant levels of 254 nm UV which serve as a powerful disinfectant, providing you both TOC-free and organism-free product water.

DRINKING WATER VIDEOS

Melissa Meeker, CEO of The Water Tower, discusses her approach to embracing modern marketing channels to create a more collaborative and interactive union between vendors, utilities and the general public.