Source Water

  1. USGS Shares Wellspring Of Insight On Groundwater Trends
    9/24/2018

    If your customer base is among the 140 million people who depend upon groundwater for drinking water, irrigation, or agriculture, it is important to know whether you can expect the quality of your source water today to be the same tomorrow. Fortunately, a recent update to the first-of-its-kind assessment of trends in groundwater supply has been announced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to help you identify emerging problems. The results are detailed in an informative and easy-to-use interactive map.

  2. Microbial Source Tracking: How Did That Get In There?
    9/13/2018

    An estimated 90 million illnesses each year are caused by exposure to microbial contaminants in U.S. recreational waters, costing approximately $2.2- $3.7 billion in medical bills. Much of the contamination is a result of human or other animal feces getting into the water. 

  3. Drones To Track One Of The Largest Dam Removals On The Eastern Seaboard
    9/12/2018

    This month, the Bloede Dam will be removed from the Lower Patapsco River near Ilchester, Maryland. The restoration is a one-of-a-kind natural experiment that will help test how relatively inexpensive drones can help scientists like me understand the integrity of streams and rivers.

  4. State Leaders Concerned About Safety Of Reusing Oil And Gas Wastewater
    8/30/2018

    Regulators from across the country met in Vermont this week at the Environmental Council of the State’s (ECOS) fall meeting to discuss some of the nation’s most pressing environmental challenges. I joined members of ECOS’ Shale Gas Caucus to discuss an emerging threat imminently impacting oil and gas-producing states: the question of what to do with the massive amount of wastewater produced by the oil and gas industry each year.

  5. EPA Researchers Develop Tool To Improve Water Quality
    8/28/2018

    Many communities face challenges when managing their water resources. For example, runoff from agricultural fields can contribute to excess nutrients in water, like phosphorous and nitrogen, which can lead to harmful algal blooms and health concerns for the surrounding community. State and local governments trying to solve environmental problems must consider the cost and effectiveness of water management decisions for their communities.

  6. Water Is A Source Of Growing Tension And Violence In The Middle East
    8/27/2018

    In the hot, dry Middle East, where populations are growing rapidly and all major rivers cross political borders, water has become a focal point for escalating violence.

  7. EPA Researchers Use Innovative Approach To Find PFAS In The Environment
    8/20/2018

    There are thousands of per- and polyfluorinated substances (PFAS) in use for countless consumer products. PFAS can make products non-stick or waterproof. They are also used in industrial processes and make up fire-fighting foams used by first responders. With so many types of PFAS in use, EPA researchers have had to use new and innovative tools to gather more information about these chemicals.

  8. EPA Scientists Develop New Methods To Evaluate Chemicals
    8/15/2018

    EPA scientists are developing and evaluating new methods to evaluate chemicals for potential health effects. These methods are fast, cost effective, and reduce our reliance on traditional methods which use laboratory animals.

  9. My Most Personal Initiation To PFAS
    8/13/2018

    When I attended the U.S. EPA-hosted PFAS Summit held at the Horsham, PA high school auditorium on July 25, 2018, the education I received from state and municipal leaders focusing on the local problem was more than just a professional briefing. It was ominously personal, due to the fact that the Water Online editorial office where I work and drink water every day is served by a utility sitting smack-dab in the middle of one of the most concentrated PFAS hotspots in the U.S.

  10. Septic Systems: The Good, The Bad, And Hyperbole
    8/8/2018

    Sorting through practical, legal, and environmental considerations related to Michigan House Bills 5752 and 5753 — proposed oversight for onsite wastewater treatment systems