Source Water

  1. Onshore Crude Oil Decontamination Using A Water Security Test Bed
    11/6/2018

    Onshore crude oil production has increased in the United States over the past few years. Oil producers, specifically the North Dakota Pipeline Authority and the Bakken Shale field producers are transporting crude oil by rail and train to both the East and West Coast oil refineries. While rail tends to be one of the safer and more efficient ways of transporting crude oil, there is still a risk of a spill. Oil spills are threats to both ground and surface waters, which can ultimately impact drinking water.

  2. Women Are The Secret Weapon For Better Water Management
    10/24/2018

    In the 1980s, the government of Malawi began providing piped water to low-income households in 50 districts, establishing community-run tap committees to collect bills and manage systems. Men made up 90 percent of committee memberships — and problems quickly became apparent.

  3. How Drought And Other Extremes Impact Water Pollution
    10/15/2018

    A Q&A with Berkeley Lab hydrological science expert Bhavna Arora, who explains how unseasonably warm weather and drought can affect water quality

  4. Coping With Mixed-Source Water Quality And Corrosion Challenges
    10/12/2018

    When it becomes necessary to expand or blend water supply sources, variety is not necessarily the spice of life. Whether new water sources are surface water or groundwater, fresh, brackish, seawater, or water recovered from aquifer storage, they can ultimately impact water treatment plant (WTP) operations and finished water quality — including compliance with the U.S. EPA Lead and Copper Rule.

  5. New Testing Method For Lead And Arsenic In Contaminated Soil Saves Money And Protects Public Health
    10/10/2018

    EPA recently validated an innovative new technology to guide the cleanup of soils contaminated with arsenic and lead. The new laboratory method, based on a “virtual stomach” that mimics human digestion, estimates the bioavailability of arsenic and lead in soils quickly and inexpensively relative to animal models. This method will increase the accuracy of Human Health Risk Assessments, potentially reducing remediation costs.

  6. How Is California Affected By The Clean Water Act Mess?
    10/5/2018

    Just when we thought the jurisdictional and regulatory issues concerning the federal Clean Water Act and the resulting implications could not get more complicated, recent developments have put that possibility to rest.

  7. Help For São Paulo’s Complex Water Woes: Protect And Restore Forests
    10/1/2018

    In 2014, São Paulo nearly ran out of water. Schools closed, crops faltered and reservoirs were left at a tiny 5 percent of their capacity for the city and its surrounding population of 22 million. It was the worst drought in eight decades.

  8. USGS Shares Wellspring Of Insight On Groundwater Trends
    9/24/2018

    If your customer base is among the 140 million people who depend upon groundwater for drinking water, irrigation, or agriculture, it is important to know whether you can expect the quality of your source water today to be the same tomorrow. Fortunately, a recent update to the first-of-its-kind assessment of trends in groundwater supply has been announced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to help you identify emerging problems. The results are detailed in an informative and easy-to-use interactive map.

  9. Microbial Source Tracking: How Did That Get In There?
    9/13/2018

    An estimated 90 million illnesses each year are caused by exposure to microbial contaminants in U.S. recreational waters, costing approximately $2.2- $3.7 billion in medical bills. Much of the contamination is a result of human or other animal feces getting into the water. 

  10. Drones To Track One Of The Largest Dam Removals On The Eastern Seaboard
    9/12/2018

    This month, the Bloede Dam will be removed from the Lower Patapsco River near Ilchester, Maryland. The restoration is a one-of-a-kind natural experiment that will help test how relatively inexpensive drones can help scientists like me understand the integrity of streams and rivers.