WASTEWATER FLOW CONTROL RESOURCES

  • Learn how water and wastewater utilities can use data to find operational efficiencies can both reduce energy costs and reduce carbon emissions.

  • Flow measurement sensors are essential parts of water treatment plants. It’s increasingly common for those products to have Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity. One industry report indicated the intelligent flow meter market will reach $3.1 billion in market worth by 2025, representing a 4.4% compound annual growth rate between 2020 and 2025.

  • McCrometer, and channel partner Tecnova, were able to help meet the demands of this water distribution customer by identifying and supplying the necessary meter to satisfy their specific needs.

  • Like all wastewater treatment facilities, the City of Pendleton WWTRRF faces the daily challenge of maintaining water safety and quality for the city while improving energy consumption and meeting city, state and national regulations. Endress+Hauser’s Promag W 0xDN electromagnetic flowmeter provides stable measurement solutions regardless of mounting locations.

  • Extraneous water in the wastewater network is likely to increase as the climate change progresses. Wastewater components can offer key information for water utilities for prioritizing network inspections and renovations, such as CCTV and manhole cover inspections. At the same time, calculating wastewater components out of pumping stations data is a valuable example of how water utilities can extract concrete insights from large data sets.

  • With the dearth of quality source water a major and worsening issue for utilities and industry, water-level monitoring is paramount for successful operations — as is stepping up to IoT technology.

  • Wastewater analytics are already being used around the world to monitor contamination, optimize treatment processes, and catch environmental scofflaws. So why has the U.S. been so slow to adopt these technologies?

  • Effectively managing hundreds of thousands of miles of sewer network is not an enviable task. And with ever changing industry regulation, stricter statutory targets, additional compliance, and a growing abundance of technology, that task could easily be regarded as insurmountable. How can you ever know exactly what’s going on throughout your entire network? It’s impossible. Or is it?

  • Raw sewage enters our rivers, lakes, and oceans at an alarming volume and frequency. This is a problem faced around the world. In some locations, great strides are being made to tackle this through infrastructure investment, often as a result of public and regulatory pressure, and because we all know that we need to do better.

  • This presentation will focus on converting and expressing flow rate gallons in minutes, converted from flow rate gallons in hours.

WASTEWATER FLOW CONTROL MEASUREMENT SOLUTIONS

WASTEWATER FLOW CONTROL MEASUREMENT VIDEOS

In this video, watch the production and calibration of a 120 inch OPTIFLUX electromagnetic flowmeter. 

FLOW CONTROL AND MEASUREMENT

 

Flow measurement can be defined as quantification of the movement of water in a given channel. Flow can be measured either by determining the displacement and/or Velocity of the water. Water meters usually control measure and display total usage in cubic meters, on either mechanical or electronic registers. 

Flow can be divided into two main flows which are: Open channel flow and Closed conduit flow. Flow is controlled by use of valves at intervals to either to slow down, allow faster flow or completely shut down the flow. Some water meters usually perform both the function or making readings and controlling flow while others just conduct measuring only. 

Meters for reclaimed water contain special lavender register covers show that the water is non-potable. Velocity-type meters measure the velocity of flow through a meter of a known internal capacity. The speed of the flow can then be converted into volume of flow for usage. Since Multi-jet meters are usually very accurate in small sizes they are normally used for residential and smaller commercial uses. Turbine meters are not as accurate as jet meters and displacement meters at low flow rates. 

A compound meter is used where high flow rates are necessary. Magnetic flow meters are a velocity-type water meter, except that they use electromagnetic properties to determine the water flow velocity. In water treatment plants, measurement and control devices can be installed in the following locations: within interceptors or manholes, the head of the plant, in the force mains that lead to main tanks etc. Automatic Meter Reading has compelled producers to build pulse or encoder registers to provide electronic output for radio transmitters, reading storage devices, and data logging devices.