DESALINATION RESOURCES

  • A staggering four billion people — two-thirds of the world’s population — experience water scarcity each year, and more than half lack access to safe sanitation services. The severity of this global water crisis will only increase as populations continue to rapidly grow, industries exhaust shared resources and extreme weather events exacerbate shortages. If we don’t act urgently, 700 million people could be displaced by intense water scarcity in just a few short years.

  • Sea water desalination is unequivocally the future of drinking water production for coastal communities and island nations in current times of water scarcity. It is already used quite heavily in a few countries. Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and the United States are the top three desalination producers of drinking water by capacity in the world followed by Australia, China, and Kuwait.

  • While it is true that more than half of our planet’s surface is covered in water, a vast majority of it is saline. Fresh water, the water we use in hundreds of ways every day, constitutes only 2.5 % of all the water on the Earth. Today, the world faces what is known as the water crisis. Parts of the world do not have access to this most vital resource on the planet. Therefore, a focus on water recycling and water reuse is required to optimize the use of our critical water resources.

  • According to recent studies conducted by the Central Florida Water Initiative, groundwater sources alone will not meet future freshwater demands for area residents. To address this looming issue, Central Florida water utilities will need to begin diversifying their water supplies. There are several options water utilities can consider when expanding their drinking water sources, including surface water, groundwater and desalination. One opportunity that is gaining nationwide popularity is potable water reuse.

  • As the agriculture economy boomed, needs for freshwater demanded by irrigation, tourism and the local community also grew in Campo de Dalías, a coastal region on the Mediterranean Sea. As a result, the region faced overexploitation of groundwater aquifers. Read the full case study to learn how Toray was selected as the sole membrane supplier for a two-pass system for a newly implemented national desalination plan.

  • Iran is facing a water crisis. The World Resources Institute says it’s number 4 on the crisis list after Israel, Lebanon, and Qatar.  Water consumption is increasing, aquifers have been drunk dry, and investment is inadequate.

  • When designing anything, whether it be a machine, a program, or a process, there are always a few key factors to consider that can determine the validity of the design. Over the past decade, water and wastewater treatment methods have been focused on developing solutions for the water scarcity epidemic with additional emphasis on sustainability. Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plant design requires careful analysis with several criteria to consider in the design of these systems.

  • Using seawater desalination RO treatment systems, coastal communities and island nations can achieve clean and safe water. So why do some countries utilize this advanced treatment technology, while others do not?

  • A seawater treatment plant was designed as one of the solutions to the recent water scarcity problems. Fresh and drinkable water isn’t easy to find in some places. As the world’s population grows and industrial production increases, even the largest of the world’s freshwater sources can eventually become strained. Therefore, desalination is meant to expand our sources of water across the world.

  • This is the second of two articles looking at the increasing reliance of Australian cities on desalination plants to supply drinking water, with less emphasis on the alternatives of water recycling and demand management. So what is the best way forward to achieve urban water security?

DESALINATION SOLUTIONS

  • WATERTRAK™ Light Industrial Reverse Osmosis The LRL Series is a truly engineered system. From pretreatment through RO tank level and posttreatment, the LRL RO family becomes a “system” by simply activating standard features.
  • Reverse Osmosis Reverse osmosis, electrodeionization, nanofiltration, and ultrafiltration are several of the membrane systems that Aquatech International Corporation offers.
  • HERO™ (High Efficiency Reverse Osmosis) Technology Aquatech offers HERO™, the highly innovative and patented technology delivers unmatched value for the treatment in a variety of industrial water and wastewater applications. Using HERO™ directly translates into improved plant performance and reduced overall costs.
  • WATERTRAK™ Ultrafiltration These filtration systems use hollow fiber membranes to remove particulate down to 0.1 micron (SDI normally <1). These systems normally operate at 90-95% recovery and can be offered as dead end or in cross flow configuration.
  • ReFlex Max™ Reverse Osmosis

    Desalitech ReFlex Max Reverse Osmosis systems are highly efficient, typically reducing brine waste by 50% to 75% and energy consumption by up to 35%.

DESALINATION VIDEOS

Alex and the crew travel to Saudi Arabia and talk to Noura Shehab, a Ph.D. student at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), about her research to use microbes to power sea water desalination.