TREATMENT RESOURCES

  • Shepard Energy Centre (owned by Enmax and Capital Power Corporation) is located in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. It began operating in March 2015 and is capable of generating over 800 megawatts of electricity to Alberta residents using natural gas. The facility utilizes (2) combustion turbines featuring a combinedcycle technology to generate electricity, and in addition, processes waste heat through a steam turbine to produce even more electricity. This electricity generation process makes Shepard approximately 30% more efficient than traditional coal-fired plants, and reduces overall fuel costs. Not only is Shepard’s plant more efficient, but better for the environment by emitting less than half of the CO2 emmissions per megawatt hour compared to a coal generated facility. Sulphur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide emissions are also reduced.

  • Water scarcity is a challenge facing many Texas communities, and it’s encouraging to see how many state leaders are proactively exploring solutions to our growing water needs. This has brought the oil and gas industry and the massive volumes of water it uses and produces each year into the conversation.

  • Everyone is familiar with the water cut statistics: three to seven barrels of produced water emerge from the ground per barrel of oil. This oft-cited statistic is useful to appreciate the scale of the volumes of water produced in the Permian Basin. However, it does not tell the whole story.

  • Collaborative research is a critical element for identifying unforeseen risks associated with using the oil industry’s wastewater outside the oilfield. That’s the recommendation of a new peer-reviewed paper accepted this week in the Journal of Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management (IEAM).

  • We’re past the midpoint of the Texas legislative session and the bill filing deadline is behind us. Because the legislature only meets for five months every other year, there’s a lot to accomplish in a short span.

  • When it comes to answering questions about whether the oil and gas industry’s wastewater can be safely reused for other purposes, like food crops, livestock, or even drinking water, there are a number of other serious factors to be considered.

  • Regulators from across the country met in Vermont this week at the Environmental Council of the State’s (ECOS) fall meeting to discuss some of the nation’s most pressing environmental challenges. I joined members of ECOS’ Shale Gas Caucus to discuss an emerging threat imminently impacting oil and gas-producing states: the question of what to do with the massive amount of wastewater produced by the oil and gas industry each year.

  • Last year was full of twists and turns for the drinking water and wastewater treatment industries. What can 2017’s biggest stories tell us about what’s to come this year?

  • As the popularity of hydraulic fracturing continues to strain available water supplies, a new technology may be the key to recycling produced water in an affordable way.

  • In the midst of a global water crisis, industries today too often overlook a river of revenue opportunity: their own wastewater.

PRODUCED WATER TREATMENT SOLUTIONS

  • Gas Buster Frac Tank, 21,000 gal

    Easily catch fluids, sand and sediments from frack flowback operations with this gas buster tank. This tank will streamline clean out, reduce wastewater and simplify sampling. Our frac tanks are fixed axle and up to 48'11" long.

  • Carbon Filter System, 2,000 lbs

    Eliminate contaminates from vapor waste or process streams with this Carbon Filter system.

  • Magnetic Flow Meters Improve Recycling Of Gas Well-Produced Water

    As old gas & oil fields play out, newer methods must be used to extract resources from areas where they are locked in layers of shale. One current technique is known as “fraccing,” in which high pressure water is pumped into the well shaft to “fracture” the rock layers, allowing more natural gas to escape and be collected. However, this technique poses a number of environmental problems, including contamination of water with hydrocarbons, solid particulates, and scale producing ions — making it unsuitable for reuse.

  • Scienco® SciCHLOR® Sodium Hypochlorite Generator

    SCIENCO® SciCHLOR® Sodium Hypochlorite Generator is a fully integrated, simple, and compact designed system. The SciCHLOR® system with SciCELL® technology uses a recirculating method to produce 0.8% strength sodium hypochlorite solution in 10 lb (4.5 kg), 20 lb (9 kg), 40 lb (18 kg) and 60 lb (27 kg) NaClO/day sizes. Featuring a multi-pass scouring design, the SciCELL® unit, control panel, and recirculation pump allows the system to automatically run at the optimum salinity to increase power efficiency, extend cell life, and power-save shut down if no usage of sodium hypochlorite.

  • Scienco® SciBRINE® Brinemaker with the new Levetrol® Plus SR (Smart Relay) Controllers

    For a complete, bulk salt storage solution, the Scienco® SciBRINE® is ideal for food processing, textile dye-setting and chemical industries. Scienco® SciBRINE® Brinemakers produces a clear, saturated brine that uses the advantages of down-flow brinemaking process in an automated system. Brinemakers are also for municipalities with large water softening systems. With multiple model sizes (tanks made locally)designed to meet both large and small-volume salt users, the Scienco® SciBRINE® System is equipped with new, state-of the-art Levetrol® Controllers and “Smart Relay” (SR) features to automate the salt and water usage, provide alerts for high/low water level alarms or solenoid valve failure.

PRODUCED WATER TREATMENT VIDEOS

The Western Governors' Drought Forum webinar “Once Marginal, Now Crucial: The Growing Demand for Re-used, Produced, and Brackish Water” explores the technological and regulatory obstacles to utilizing re-used, produced, and brackish water.