RESILIENCY RESOURCES

  • Preparing To Tackle The Hydra Of LCR Revisions

    As a journalist serving the water industry — but not yet a seasoned technical veteran — I attended a recent Lead In Drinking Water Forum sponsored by AWWA NJ to learn about the challenges of complying with the proposed Lead and Copper Rule Revisions (LCRR). What I heard impressed upon me the technical, administrative, and logistical challenges of delivering safe, lead-free drinking water all the way to user taps. Here are my takeaways.

  • The Insta-Valve 250 Minimizes Disruption During An Emergency

    Like so many municipalities, the City of Miamisburg has an aging infrastructure of valves that had not been excercised in decades. Read the full project brief to learn how Hydra-Stop’s solution allowed greater control that minimized shutdown when a water main ruptured.

  • Denver Water Goes 'Gold' For Its Work To Cut Climate Impacts

    Denver Water has been formally recognized for its long-running work to track its carbon emissions.

  • How Wetlands Help Rescue Us From Drought

    With South Africa’s water security on a knife-edge, there is an urgent need for wetlands to be rehabilitated and preserved.

  • More Frequent And Intense Tropical Storms Mean Less Recovery Time For The World's Coastlines

    Tropical cyclones — storms that bring strong, rotating winds and rain, and which can intensify into hurricanes or typhoons — affect coastal regions around the world. Our research team, centered at the University of North Carolina’s Institute of Marine Sciences, has analyzed a 120-year record of tropical cyclones affecting coastal North Carolina, and found that six of the seven wettest storms over this time period occurred in the past two decades.

  • EPA Researchers Help Prepare Drinking Water Utilities For Natural Disasters

    Natural disasters such as floods, drought, hurricanes, winter storms, and earthquakes can disrupt access to clean drinking water. These events can result in any number of types of water service disruptions including pipe breaks and leaks; power outages; infrastructure failure; reduced water quality; loss of access to facilities and supplies; as well as financial, social, environmental and health consequences.

  • Funding Is Slow But Always Available For Disaster Recovery Projects

    Looking for a diverse and lucrative public-sector marketplace? If so, don’t overlook upcoming opportunities related to natural disaster recovery in regions that were ravaged by floods, fires, and other weather-related disasters. Demand for private-sector firms to provide services in these regions is extremely high.

  • Another Summer Of Flooding Should Be A Wake-Up Call To Redesign Our Communities

    Hurricane Dorian has left a trail of devastation over the last few days, but an onslaught of destructive floods have hit communities all across the country this summer. From small towns in the Midwest and Southeast to large cities like Washington and New York, torrential rains have inundated homes, cut power, and disrupted lives.

  • Global Perspective On Water In The Circular Economy

    Isn’t it ironic that our beautiful blue planet, covered 70 percent with water, is struggling to meet citizens’ water needs? Yes, and the reasons are obvious. Out of the Earth’s total water, less than 3 percent is available as freshwater, and a portion of it is actually accessible. Uneven distribution of fresh waterbodies and population across the globe further skew water supply and demand ratios. Also, climate change, deforestation, desertification, droughts, floods, and depletion of natural waterbodies resulting from anthropogenic and natural activities add to these miseries.

  • Western States Buy Time With A 7-Year Colorado River Drought Plan, But Face A Hotter, Drier Future

    As Midwest states struggled with record spring flooding this year, the Southwest was wrestling with the opposite problem: not enough water. On May 20, 2019, federal officials and leaders from seven states signed the Colorado River Drought Contingency Plan, a sweeping new water management agreement for this arid region.

RESILIENCY SOLUTIONS

  • Water Network Optimization Suite

    The Water Network Optimization Suite by Schneider Electric provides water utilities an overview of the entire water distribution network in real-time and in “future-time” by enabling operators to be forewarned of critical situations in the network so that immediate actions to prevent or mitigate service disruptions can be taken with enough lead time.

  • Super Centurion┬« A-459 Urban Fire Hydrant

    Hydrants share responsibilities with two important groups of professionals: (1) water departments and the utility crews that manage them; and (2) fire departments, who are the first responders to emergencies. Both groups use the hydrant for different purposes.

  • Aquis Water Network Management

    80% of your capital is invested in the distribution network. Aquis puts you in control.

RESILIENCY VIDEOS

While we are still not sure how granny hit a Mueller® hydrant in this quiet residential neighborhood, a duo of ever-so-helpful water utility personnel install a new safety flange, repair the hydrant and help granny get back behind the wheel.