LEAD AND COPPER RULE (LCR) RESOURCES

  • New Lead Reduction Program Underway In Denver

    In March, Denver Water is kicking off its Lead Reduction Program, which was approved by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment in December 2019.

  • EPA Awards Iowa $460,000 To Test For Lead In School Drinking Water

    Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 7 announced $460,000 in grant funding for the Iowa Department of Education to help schools and child care programs in Iowa test for lead within their drinking water systems.

  • EPA Researchers Help Water Systems Keep Lead Out Of Drinking Water

    An estimated six to ten million older homes across the country have lead service lines. Service lines connect individual houses to the water main in the street; this means that water coming into a house may be transported via a lead service line even if no lead pipes are visible inside the home. Lead can be transferred from the lead pipe into the drinking water when the pipe materials corrode, when there are physical disturbances to the pipe, or when there are changes to the quality of water entering the home.

  • Water Industry Responds To Proposed LCR Revisions

    With more than 50,000 community water systems (CWS) in the U.S., it is amazing that only 285 individuals had logged public comments on the U.S. EPA’s proposed Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) Revisions by the February 12, 2020 deadline. Yet, what those respondents had to say could have a big impact on how we deal with lead in drinking water moving forward. Here is a cross-section of the industry’s response.

  • EPA Announces Availability Of $40M To Further Reduce Lead In Drinking Water

    Today, as part of EPA’s 50th anniversary celebration, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the availability of approximately $40M to assist disadvantaged communities and schools with removing sources of lead in drinking water.

  • ASDWA Submits Comments On Proposed Lead and Copper Rule Revisions (LCRR)

    On Monday (2/10), ASDWA submitted its comments on EPA’s proposed Lead and Copper Rule Revisions (LCRR). ASDWA’s comments have four main themes...

  • LCR Revisions: Speak Now, Or Forever Hold Your Peace

    Are you completely ready to implement the scores of changes in the U.S. EPA’s Lead and Copper Rule Revisions (LCRR), exactly as proposed? If not, act quickly, because time to register constructive feedback before the February 12th deadline is running out. Less than three weeks before the end of the comment period, the EPA’s webpage for feedback displayed only 131 public submissions regarding the proposed regulations.

  • Preparing To Tackle The Hydra Of LCR Revisions

    As a journalist serving the water industry — but not yet a seasoned technical veteran — I attended a recent Lead In Drinking Water Forum sponsored by AWWA NJ to learn about the challenges of complying with the proposed Lead and Copper Rule Revisions (LCRR). What I heard impressed upon me the technical, administrative, and logistical challenges of delivering safe, lead-free drinking water all the way to user taps. Here are my takeaways.

  • The Elected Official's Guide To Understanding The US Lead Effect

    “The water crisis in Flint is the Cuyahoga River fire of our generation: an event that thrust a widespread but underappreciated problem into the national consciousness.”

  • EPA Proposed Revisions To The Lead & Copper Rule

    On October 10th, EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler announced the long-awaited proposed revisions to the Lead and Copper Rule (LCRR) which was promulgated nearly 30 years ago under the Safe Drinking Water Act.

LCR SOLUTIONS

  • LCR Compliance

    Between ever-evolving rules and regulations and numerous stakeholders, compliance can be hard. Our software automatically ingests lab results, triggers consumer notifications, and ensures that those stakeholders are in the know – and that you are fully compliant.

  • How To Improve Test Accuracy With The Latest Sampling Technology

    Sampling and laboratory testing are major responsibilities for water professionals. Test results are used for process control, and ultimately to determine that water is safe for drinking, reuse, or discharge to the environment. Regulatory agencies rely on reported results for proof of permit compliance. So, obtaining representative, properly collected and preserved samples is the first critical step to ensure accurate test results.

  • EPA’s Six-Year Review 3: How To Prepare For Potential Rule Revisions

    Staying on top of new regulations is a never-ending responsibility for water professionals. Each new rule may require huge dollars in capital and operating costs. Operators and technicians may need training on new technologies, sampling, and testing methods.

  • Piping Up About Chemical Resistance

    The lead contamination crisis in Flint, MI, brought more attention to the country’s piping systems than we’ve seen in a long time. Average Americans were questioning what exactly constitutes the water infrastructure below them and what that might mean for the water they enjoy in their homes.

  • Recordall® Models 120 and 170, Lead-Free Bronze Alloy, Sizes 1-1/2" and 2"

    The Recordall Models 120 and 170 Disc Series meters meet or exceed the most recent revision of AWWA Standard C700 and are available in a lead-free bronze alloy.

LCR MULTIMEDIA

For water utilities facing various water contamination issues, there is no single catch-all treatment. That is why in this recent Water Talk interview Ronit Erlitzki and Doug Craver of AdEdge Water Technologies share treatment options that can be used alone or in combination to address diverse challenges. They introduce a new reverse osmosis (RO) treatment technique capable of raising recovery rates by 20 percent and reducing concentrate volume up to 70 percent vs. conventional RO (depending on water quality). They also explore biological processes for removing nitrate, VOC, ammonia, etc. and treating high brine concentrations in wastewater, plus techniques for resolving ammonia problems in water with high TOC concentrations.

ABOUT LEAD AND COPPER

The U.S. EPA’s Lead and Copper Rule (LCR), a mandate for drinking water utilities and pipeline products manufacturers to reduce the public’s exposure to lead, received increased scrutiny following the 2014 lead crisis in Flint, MI, leading to new Lead and Copper Rule Revisions (LCRR) which take effect in 2020. Although the LCR has been updated numerous times, the most recent requirements demand a level of action unprecedented since the LCR's initial implementation in 1991. Under the LCRR, utilities must have programs in place for tap-sampling, corrosion control treatment (CCT), lead service line replacement (LSLR), consumer communication, and public education. LCRR will affect almost all aspects of utility operations (treatment, distribution, labor, financial planning, consumer outreach, etc.) to varying and often complex degrees. This information hub will provide LCRR guidance, news, and analysis to facilitate compliance, answering questions such as: What is the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for lead and copper? Who is responsible for the lead service line (LSL)? Which chemicals provide corrosion control? When do Lead and Copper Rule Revisions take effect?

If you have a question not answered here, send an email to editor@wateronline.com.