LEAD AND COPPER RULE (LCR) RESOURCES

LCR SOLUTIONS

  • LCR Compliance

    Between ever-evolving rules and regulations and numerous stakeholders, compliance can be hard. Our software automatically ingests lab results, triggers consumer notifications, and ensures that those stakeholders are in the know – and that you are fully compliant.

  • How To Improve Test Accuracy With The Latest Sampling Technology

    Sampling and laboratory testing are major responsibilities for water professionals. Test results are used for process control, and ultimately to determine that water is safe for drinking, reuse, or discharge to the environment. Regulatory agencies rely on reported results for proof of permit compliance. So, obtaining representative, properly collected and preserved samples is the first critical step to ensure accurate test results.

  • EPA’s Six-Year Review 3: How To Prepare For Potential Rule Revisions

    Staying on top of new regulations is a never-ending responsibility for water professionals. Each new rule may require huge dollars in capital and operating costs. Operators and technicians may need training on new technologies, sampling, and testing methods.

  • Piping Up About Chemical Resistance

    The lead contamination crisis in Flint, MI, brought more attention to the country’s piping systems than we’ve seen in a long time. Average Americans were questioning what exactly constitutes the water infrastructure below them and what that might mean for the water they enjoy in their homes.

  • Recordall® Models 120 and 170, Lead-Free Bronze Alloy, Sizes 1-1/2" and 2"

    The Recordall Models 120 and 170 Disc Series meters meet or exceed the most recent revision of AWWA Standard C700 and are available in a lead-free bronze alloy.

LCR MULTIMEDIA

After rising public pressure and lawsuits over health concerns, the city of Newark, New Jersey (a half-hour from New York City) is undertaking one of the most ambitious and impactful infrastructure projects in the country: replacing all of its residential lead service lines within 2 years.

ABOUT LEAD AND COPPER

The U.S. EPA’s Lead and Copper Rule (LCR), a mandate for drinking water utilities and pipeline products manufacturers to reduce the public’s exposure to lead, received increased scrutiny following the 2014 lead crisis in Flint, MI, leading to new Lead and Copper Rule Revisions (LCRR) which take effect in 2020. Although the LCR has been updated numerous times, the most recent requirements demand a level of action unprecedented since the LCR's initial implementation in 1991. Under the LCRR, utilities must have programs in place for tap-sampling, corrosion control treatment (CCT), lead service line replacement (LSLR), consumer communication, and public education. LCRR will affect almost all aspects of utility operations (treatment, distribution, labor, financial planning, consumer outreach, etc.) to varying and often complex degrees. This information hub will provide LCRR guidance, news, and analysis to facilitate compliance, answering questions such as: What is the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for lead and copper? Who is responsible for the lead service line (LSL)? Which chemicals provide corrosion control? When do Lead and Copper Rule Revisions take effect?

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