CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

Three Valleys Water District Chooses Low-Maintenance Enclosed Ammonia Feed System For Chloramination
Three Valleys Water District Chooses Low-Maintenance Enclosed Ammonia Feed System For Chloramination

Three Valleys Municipal Water District (Three Valleys) is one of 26 water agencies that comprise the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD). Three Valleys is the primary source of supplemental water for the Pomona, Walnut, and East San Gabriel Valleys.

Maximum Ozone Transfer Efficiency Across Broad Range Of Water Flow
Maximum Ozone Transfer Efficiency Across Broad Range Of Water Flow

The design team for the intermediate ozone system at Buckingham Water Treatment Plant, Quebec, had limited space available for ozone contacting for the plant’s 1.3 – 7.4 MGD flow, so a standard fine bubble diffusion basin for ozone disinfection was not an option.

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CONTAMINANT REMOVAL PRODUCTS

Next Gen Capital Controls® Chlorinators Next Gen Capital Controls® Chlorinators

New compact chlorinator incorporates pioneering Capital Controls® technology with exciting new features. All three models - from 10-10,000 ppd - are available with automatic or manual feed and a larger 10” flowmeter. Sonic operation on the 4100 model eliminates the need for a differential pressure regulator.  On automatic models, an additional controller isn’t needed, reducing components – and costs. 

Aqueous Ammonia Feed Systems Aqueous Ammonia Feed Systems

The IMS packaged Aqueous Ammonia Feed Systems include a heavy duty pressure rated aqueous ammonia storage tank, integral ammonia fume scrubber, peristaltic dosing pump, instrumentation and controls in a fully contained, pre-assembled skid.

Sodium Fluoride Feed Systems Sodium Fluoride Feed Systems

The IMS Fluoride Feed Systems are designed with separate saturator and solution tanks to ensure complete saturation, high reliability, low maintenance, and ease of use. Systems are sized to meet customer requirements.

GDT Mixing & Contacting Systems GDT Mixing & Contacting Systems

The GDT™ Process starts with the creation of ozone from an Ozone Generator. The ozone is then drawn into a Mazzei®Venturi Injector which provides dynamic mixing (a Back Pressure Control Valve adjusts injector outlet pressure optimizing ozone mass transfer in the system). Then mixing and contacting is enhanced in a Flash Reactor™. From there the two-phase flow travels to the Degas Separator (DS) & Relief Valve for additional mixing and entrained gas removal. And finally, the MTM Mixing Nozzles force dissolved ozone flow into the untreated water in the pipeline or basin for thorough mixing.

UV Package Plant UV Package Plant

Calgon Carbon UV Technologies is pleased to introduce the C3500D/PS Packaged System for UV Wastewater Disinfection. This product uniquely addresses the needs of smaller communities with effluent flows of less than 2.6 million gallons a day.

Liquid Ammonium Sulfate Feed Systems Liquid Ammonium Sulfate Feed Systems

IMS’s custom-designed, modular LAS Feed Systems for water processes are pre-assembled, factory-piped, wired and tested, offering low installation costs and typical installation time of only 2 hours.

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DRINKING WATER CONTAMINANT REMOVAL PODCASTS

How Do You Build A Heavier Floc And Let It Sink And Settle Faster? How Do You Build A Heavier Floc And Let It Sink And Settle Faster?

That’s a question that Jim Georger, regional sales manager with Kruger, a division of Veolia, discussed with Water Online Radio recently.

LA Story: Advanced Treatment, Reuse Saves Scarce Water Resources LA Story: Advanced Treatment, Reuse Saves Scarce Water Resources

Officials in Los Angeles have grown tired of importing water, which is an expensive, unsustainable response to the region's persistent drought. The smarter solution, they concluded, is to reuse local resources through advanced purification and aquifer recharge. But how do you ensure safety and efficiency before committing to a treatment technology? A unique piloting tool from Xylem’s Wedeco brand offered the city clear answers.

Fighting India’s Arsenic Problem Fighting India’s Arsenic Problem

When Vinny Gupta, the president and CEO of InNow LLC, met Rich Cavagnaro, the CEO of AdEdge Water Technologies, he saw an opportunity to help 40 million people get clean water.

Ozone: An Emerging Star For Disinfection Ozone: An Emerging Star For Disinfection

There are many places around the country where water shortage is a big issue. Water is the most precious resource we have, and in light of the shortage, people have started trying to investigate creative ways of ‘what’s my next water resource,’ Chris Milligan, vice president, director of engineering with BlueInGreen, told Water Online Radio in an interview.

Making Aftermarket Service And Support Work For Water And Wastewater Treatment Plants Making Aftermarket Service And Support Work For Water And Wastewater Treatment Plants

As municipalities look to make their water and wastewater treatment equipment run longer with fewer operational staff on payroll to maintain the equipment, having a reliable aftermarket parts and service provider becomes essential.

The Reward Of Risk: New Tech Pays Off The Reward Of Risk: New Tech Pays Off

The engineering community can sometimes be wary of trying anything other than the technologies they are already accustomed to, says Rich Cavagnaro of Adedge, a purification technology company with a focus on nitrates and radionuclides.

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CONTAMINANT REMOVAL VIDEOS

Safeguarding Source Water: How Online Monitoring Of Algae Leads To Data-Driven Decisions Safeguarding Source Water: How Online Monitoring Of Algae Leads To Data-Driven Decisions

Join Dr. Arash Zamyadi, UNSW Australia, and Kevin Simpson, YSI on July 28 at 2:00 EST for a webinar in which they will discuss recent work deploying optical sensing technology to monitor for harmful algae blooms (HAB’s) in raw water.

Calgon Carbon Reactivation Video Calgon Carbon Reactivation Video

After an activated carbon’s adsorptive capacity has been exhausted, it can be returned to Calgon Carbon for thermal reactivation. With high temperature reactivation followed by off-gas treatment, the adsorbed organic compounds are destroyed and reactivated carbon can be safely and cost-effectively recycled back to facilities for continued use.

Leopold® FilterWorx® Overview Leopold® FilterWorx® Overview

FilterWorx® is a complete water filtration system engineered to improve efficiency and reliability. Ideally suited for applications such as potable drinking water treatment, tertiary wastewater treatment, nutrient removal in water or wastewater, pretreatment prior to low-pressure membrane systems, and RO membrane desalination pretreatment, FilterWorx performance filters feature a flat-bottom flume, fiberglass backwash water troughs, engineered media, three types of underdrains, and media retainers in two different sizes. In addition, FilterWorx control systems provide the longest filtration run cycles to reduce energy consumption and wastewater generation, thereby lowering operating costs.

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ABOUT

The removal of contaminants from public drinking water systems in the US is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) National Primary Drinking Water Regulations. These are legally enforceable standards that protect public health by limiting the levels of contaminants in drinking water. Similar regulations are managed by agencies worldwide to protect their citizens from drinking water contamination.

There are a plethora of drinking water contaminant removal technologies that public and private water systems use to comply with the EPA’s drinking water regulations. These include reverse osmosis, membrane, nanofiltration, ultrafiltration, chlorine disinfection, UV disinfection and Ozone-based disinfection practices.

The EPA’s list of drinking water contaminants is organized into six types of contaminants and lists each contaminant along with its Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL), some of the potential health effects from long-term exposure above the MCL and the probable source of the drinking water contaminant.

The six types of contaminants are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

Examples of microbiological, organic contaminants are Cryptosporidium and Giardia lamblia. Both of these microorganic pathogens are found in human or animal fecal waste and cause gastrointestinal illness, such as diarrhea and vomiting.

A common disinfectant used in municipal drinking water treatment to disinfect microorganisms is chlorine. The EPA’s primary drinking water regulations require drinking water treatment plants to maintain a maximum disinfectant residual level (MDRL) for chlorine of 4.0 milligrams per liter (mg/L). Some of the detrimental health effects of chlorine above the MCL are eye irritation and stomach discomfort.

Similarly, byproducts from the chlorine-based disinfection methods used by public water systems to remove contaminants can be contaminants in their own right if not removed from the drinking water prior to it being released into the distribution system. Examples of disinfection byproducts include bromate, chlorite and total trihalomethanes (TTHMs). Not removed from drinking water, these disinfection byproducts can increase risk of cancer and cause central nervous system issues.

Chemical contamination of drinking water can be caused by inorganic chemicals such as arsenic, barium lead, mercury and cadmium or organic chemicals such as benzene, dichloroethane and other carbon-derived compounds. These chemicals get into source water through a variety of natural and industrial processes. Arsenic for example is present in source water through the erosion of natural deposits.  Many of the chemical contaminants are derived from industrial wastewater such as discharges from petroleum refineries, steel or pulp mills or the corrosion of asbestos cement water mains or galvanized pipes.

Radium and uranium are examples of radionuclides. Radium 226 and Radium 228 must be removed to a level of 5 picocuries/liter (PCI/L) and Uranium to a level of 30 micrograms/liter (30 ug/L).