DRINKING WATER

A Sound Approach To Evaluating NRW Loss And Aging Pipelines
A Sound Approach To Evaluating NRW Loss And Aging Pipelines

As water distribution infrastructure ages, the potential for leaks grows and the need for condition-driven asset management increases proportionally. As with so many other aspects of water operations, planning ahead is key. Good system diagnosis using noninvasive procedures provides an accurate and cost-effective assessment of distribution system integrity, just as noninvasive monitoring of heartbeat, pulse, and blood pressure plays an important role in human health.

DRINKING WATER CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

  •  ATP And DNA – Who’s On First?
    ATP And DNA – Who’s On First?

    As some of you may have heard, LuminUltra has partnered with Microbe Detectives to offer DNA testing services to the drinking water and wastewater industries. So “Who’s on First?” (pun intended); simply put, the partnership’s combined technologies tell you who is in a given water or wastewater sample, and how much is in that sample.

  • Understanding Head Loss … And Why It Matters
    Understanding Head Loss … And Why It Matters

    Satisfying water purification and volume requirements at the treatment plant or wellhead are not the only cost-performance impacts on physical operations. There are other variables related to distribution operations that affect head loss and energy costs throughout a distribution system. Here are several strategies for identifying, calculating, and minimizing head loss.

  • Addressing Fouling Challenges In Water Treatment With RO Membrane
    Addressing Fouling Challenges In Water Treatment With RO Membrane

    Reverse osmosis (RO) membranes are widely used in potable water, wastewater, and industrial applications. However, a major issue in the application of RO membrane technology for desalination and wastewater reclamation is membrane fouling. It limits operating flux, decreases water production, and increases power consumption. Membrane fouling also increases the need for RO plants to perform periodical membrane CIP procedure. These problems decrease process efficiency, increase operation cost, and raise environmental issues related to the CIP solutions disposal.

  • Pre-Filtration Is Essential To Protect Your Membranes
    Pre-Filtration Is Essential To Protect Your Membranes

    Any Reverse Osmosis System is only as good as the Pre-filtration System protecting it.  Pre-filtration is no place to scrimp when it comes to sizing, quality, efficiency and performance. 

  • Ozone Resolves Hydrogen Sulfide And Color Issues In Well Water
    Ozone Resolves Hydrogen Sulfide And Color Issues In Well Water

    A potable water plant in Eastern Angelina County, Texas,  serves over 2,000 rural customers.

  • Color Reduction From RO Concentrate
    Color Reduction From RO Concentrate

    The City of Palm Coast, FL was experiencing elevated color in the concentrate stream being directed to the lime softening facility to recover as drinking water. In an effort to meet secondary color standards at the lime plant, this water quality issue limited the volume of the concentrate able to be recovered.

  • Produce Potable And Pharmaceutical Grade Water From Problematic Brackish Water
    Produce Potable And Pharmaceutical Grade Water From Problematic Brackish Water

    A pharmaceutical manufacturing plant located in Sedom, Israel faced challenging environmental conditions including low humidity, temperatures exceeding 105 degrees Fahrenheit and limited water supplies.

  • How AMR Data Helps Water Utilities Avoid Missed Opportunities
    How AMR Data Helps Water Utilities Avoid Missed Opportunities

    The lack of IT insight on data collected from a technology-driven advanced meter reading (AMR) system could forfeit the best uses of the data. Indeed, it has become increasingly apparent to water utilities that interdepartmental collaboration between IT and operations is an essential component of the solutions-spending decision-making process. In this case study, you’ll learn how and why the District of Columbia’s Water and Sewer Authority (WASA) involved its IT team to use every facet of its AMR systems’ functionality and the benefits reaped as a result. 

  • Encore® 700 Chemical Metering Pumps Provide Precise Coagulant Metering
    Encore® 700 Chemical Metering Pumps Provide Precise Coagulant Metering

    Water utility operators are increasingly challenged by scrutiny and regulation on disinfection by-product (DBP) levels while trying to manage ever increasing coagulant costs in a tight budget environment.

  • Degas Separator Selected For Wichita Aquifer Storage And Recovery Project
    Degas Separator Selected For Wichita Aquifer Storage And Recovery Project

    In the 1990s, the City of Wichita, KS, developed a water supply plan that included creating a sustainable water supply through the year 2050. The key component of the plan is recharging the large aquifer that lies under the region with 100 MGD of water from the Little Arkansas River.

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DRINKING WATER APPLICATION NOTES

  • Application Note: Troubleshooting A pH Electrode

    Many factors affect performance of a pH electrode. When performance degrades, it is always a challenge for the analyst to identify the cause. Common troubleshooting procedures, which include evaluation of slope, electrode drift, time response, and accuracy, take considerable time. By Thermo Fisher Scientific

  • Wireless PRV Monitoring Application Note

    Pressure reducing valves (PRVs) are used throughout water distribution systems to reduce pipeline pressure to a predetermined set point. This decreases water loss and prevents pipe breaks.

  • Defining Drinking Water Plant Backwash Profile Using The SOLITAX™ Sc Suspended Solids And Turbidity Sensor

    Today’s drinking water plants have many challenges to meet as they produce water for a fast-growing and increasingly demanding population.

  • Hach FilterTrak 660™ Sc Laser Nephelometer Even More Practical For Ultra-Low Turbidity Monitoring

    Now compatible with the Hach sc100 Controller, the FilterTrak 660 sc Nephelometer connects as a ‘plug and play’ sensor with the universal, dualchannel controller that features an inherent power supply.

  • Dissolved Oxygen Measurement

    One of the most important measurements in the determination of the health of a body of water is its dissolved oxygen content. The quantity of dissolved oxygen in water is normally expressed in parts per million (ppm) by weight and is due to the solubility of oxygen from the atmosphere around us.

  • Reverse Osmosis Application Bulletin

    Electrical conductivity is the most convenient method for testing RO water quality and membrane performance. Pure water is actually a poor electrical conductor. The amount of ionized substances (salts, acids, or bases) dissolved in water determines its conductivity. Normally, the vast majority of the dissolved minerals in tap, surface or ground water

  • Monitoring Nitrates In Drinking Water And Wastewater

    Nitrate is present in high levels in wastewater due in part to the high nitrates present in human sewage but also from some types of industrial effluent entering the municipal sewer system.

  • Secret To Disinfection Monitoring For High Chlorine Residual Wastewater Applications

    Some wastewater applications require chlorine residuals greater than can be effectively monitored using DPD due to the oxidation of the Wurster dye to a colorless Imine. Such applications include industrial wastewater processes that inherently have a high chlorine demand thereby requiring a more robust monitoring method.

  • Benefits Of UV Transmittance (UVT) Field Testing For Selling & Servicing UV Disinfection Systems

    The Real UV254 'P' series portable meters can be used to measure UV transmittance (UVT) in a number of situations, and are especially beneficially when working with small UV disinfection systems. The following cases outline two situations in which Real Tech's portable meters are invaluable.

  • The Importance Of Measuring Total Organic Carbon

    Organic carbon compounds vary greatly. In fact, one of the first lessons in most introductory Organic Chemistry courses explains that the number of possible carbon compounds is virtually infinite due to carbon’s ability to form long, chain-like molecules. While chromatographic methods like gas chromatography (GC) or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are able to make quantitative determinations for specific compounds, the user must first know which specific compounds to look for.

More Drinking Water Application Notes

DRINKING WATER PRODUCTS

Single Rolling Diaphragm Pressure Reducing Valve Single Rolling Diaphragm Pressure Reducing Valve

The SRD Pressure Reducing Valves provide smooth, steady and precise pressure control from maximum to virtually zero flow without the need for low-flow bypass valves. The effective area of a single rolling diaphragm remains constant so the bonnet is much smaller and lighter than a flat diaphragm version. A measured quantity into the bonnet control chamber always gives the same smooth movement of the inner valve through the entire stroke. A smaller bonnet also makes the valve lighter and safer for maintenance, while the smaller control chamber enables it to respond faster to changing pressures. By eliminating the seat chatter at low flows, the SRD avoids injecting small pressure pulses into the piping, which, over time, may increase leakage, losses or pipe bursts.

Aqua-Jet® SS-PW Surface Aerator For THM Removal Aqua-Jet® SS-PW Surface Aerator For THM Removal

The Aqua-Jet® SS-PW surface mechanical aerator, manufactured by Aqua-Aerobic Systems is certified to NSF/ANSI 61 by UL for use in potable water applications. These units can be utilized for THM stripping applications or circulation in potable water treatment systems and reservoirs with a minimum volume of 100,000 gallons.

Signet 8900 Multi-Parameter Controller Signet 8900 Multi-Parameter Controller
The Signet 8900 Multi-Parameter Controller takes the concept of modularity to the extreme. Each 8900 is field commissioned with the users specified combination of inputs, outputs, and relays using simple-to-install modular boards into the base unit
AquaSorb® Activated Carbons For Water Treatment AquaSorb® Activated Carbons For Water Treatment

Granular, powdered and extruded activated carbons for the primary treatment of water, recovery and recirculation of process liquors, and treatment of waste liquid streams. The AquaSorb® range of activated process water treatment carbon is manufactured from coal, coconut shell and wood raw materials through steam or chemical activation. Jacobi Carbons offers a supply of AquaSorb® in a range of granular, extruded (pelletised) and ground powder forms, which are specifically designed for use in the liquid phase adsorption systems. From use in large municipal treatment facilities, to small domestic use cartridges, AquaSorb® is synonymous with high efficiency, extended life and cost-effective solutions.

OPUS® II Technology - a New Innovation for High Recovery of Water for Reuse OPUS® II Technology - a New Innovation for High Recovery of Water for Reuse

OPUS® II is a proprietary process for high recovery of complex wastewater streams. This new innovation uses CeraMem® ceramic membranes as pretreatment for reverse osmosis to reduce the system footprint. OPUS II can be delivered in modular, containerized units to minimize installation costs.

Like the original OPUS technology, OPUS II effectively removes silica, organics, hardness, boron, strontium and particulates. It generates high quality effluent at a high recovery rate, providing clean water for discharge, recycle or reuse.

SmartPoint® 520M Pit Set Module SmartPoint® 520M Pit Set Module

The SmartPoint® 520M pit set module is a radio transceiver designed for use in submersible, pit set environments. With true two-way communication ability, it serves as a walk-by endpoint, drive-by endpoint, fixed-base endpoint or any combination of those. This versatility gives you highly flexible data collection options and simplifies both current operations and network evolution.

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LATEST INSIGHTS ON DRINKING WATER

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DRINKING WATER VIDEOS

Video: Monitoring Water Consumption Video: Monitoring Water Consumption
KROHNE's Joe Incontri discusses monitoring water consumption and the importance of accurate and reliable meters. Water savings means green savings.
Video: Mayor Bloomberg Announces Installation Of Automated Water Meter Readers Video: Mayor Bloomberg Announces Installation Of Automated Water Meter Readers
Mayor Bloomberg, Department of Environmental Protection Acting Commissioner Lawitts and Department of Information Technology and Telecommunication Commissioner Cosgrave announced today that citywide installation of automated water meter reading technology has begun.
The New IQ SensorNet Product Video The New IQ SensorNet Product Video

The IQ SensorNet wastewater treatment process monitor is a powerful, modular system designed to be flexible enough to place anywhere in your wastewater treatment system and add to it at anytime.

TrojanUVTorrent™ Drinking Water UV Disinfection System (Video) TrojanUVTorrent™ Drinking Water UV Disinfection System (Video)

The TrojanUVTorrent™ is the solution for large-scale drinking water facilities in need of revolutionary UV disinfection technology.

People Drink Sewage Water For The First Time

Rather drink sewage water than LA tap water any day.

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ABOUT DRINKING WATER

In most developed countries, drinking water is regulated to ensure that it meets drinking water quality standards. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers these standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)

Drinking water considerations can be divided into three core areas of concern:

  1. Source water for a community’s drinking water supply
  2. Drinking water treatment of source water
  3. Distribution of treated drinking water to consumers

Drinking Water Sources

Source water access is imperative to human survival. Sources may include groundwater from aquifers, surface water from rivers and streams and seawater through a desalination process. Direct or indirect water reuse is also growing in popularity in communities with limited access to sources of traditional surface or groundwater. 

Source water scarcity is a growing concern as populations grow and move to warmer, less aqueous climates; climatic changes take place and industrial and agricultural processes compete with the public’s need for water. The scarcity of water supply and water conservation are major focuses of the American Water Works Association.

Drinking Water Treatment

Drinking Water Treatment involves the removal of pathogens and other contaminants from source water in order to make it safe for humans to consume. Treatment of public drinking water is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. Common examples of contaminants that need to be treated and removed from water before it is considered potable are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

There are a variety of technologies and processes that can be used for contaminant removal and the removal of pathogens to decontaminate or treat water in a drinking water treatment plant before the clean water is pumped into the water distribution system for consumption.

The first stage in treating drinking water is often called pretreatment and involves screens to remove large debris and objects from the water supply. Aeration can also be used in the pretreatment phase. By mixing air and water, unwanted gases and minerals are removed and the water improves in color, taste and odor.

The second stage in the drinking water treatment process involves coagulation and flocculation. A coagulating agent is added to the water which causes suspended particles to stick together into clumps of material called floc. In sedimentation basins, the heavier floc separates from the water supply and sinks to form sludge, allowing the less turbid water to continue through the process.

During the filtration stage, smaller particles not removed by flocculation are removed from the treated water by running the water through a series of filters. Filter media can include sand, granulated carbon or manufactured membranes. Filtration using reverse osmosis membranes is a critical component of removing salt particles where desalination is being used to treat brackish water or seawater into drinking water.

Following filtration, the water is disinfected to kill or disable any microbes or viruses that could make the consumer sick. The most traditional disinfection method for treating drinking water uses chlorine or chloramines. However, new drinking water disinfection methods are constantly coming to market. Two disinfection methods that have been gaining traction use ozone and ultra-violet (UV) light to disinfect the water supply.

Drinking Water Distribution

Drinking water distribution involves the management of flow of the treated water to the consumer. By some estimates, up to 30% of treated water fails to reach the consumer. This water, often called non-revenue water, escapes from the distribution system through leaks in pipelines and joints, and in extreme cases through water main breaks.

A public water authority manages drinking water distribution through a network of pipes, pumps and valves and monitors that flow using flow, level and pressure measurement sensors and equipment.

Water meters and metering systems such as automatic meter reading (AMR) and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) allows a water utility to assess a consumer’s water use and charge them for the correct amount of water they have consumed.