DRINKING WATER

Membrane Module Pilot Test In North Dakota
Membrane Module Pilot Test In North Dakota

Toray UF membrane modules were piloted over a fifteen-week period to help service the growing demand for clean water in southwest North Dakota. The outcome, as part of the Southwest Pipeline Project (SWPP), would be construction of the Oliver-Mercer-North Dunn (OMND) Water Treatment Plant.

DRINKING WATER CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

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DRINKING WATER APPLICATION NOTES

  • Comparison of UV vs. Sodium Hypochlorite (Fact Sheet)

    Hypochlorite has some significant environmental concerns associated with DBPs and residual toxicity.

  • Application Note: Real-Time Monitoring-Through Swell And High Water Application article about water quality monitoring pontoon providing continuous data in the Burry Inlet, an estuary in Wales. By YSI
  • Chlorine Method For UKAS Accreditation And DWI Compliance At Welsh Water

    In 2013 the Drinking Water Inspectorate for England & Wales announced that water samples collected in England and Wales must be tested in a laboratory that meets specific standards for drinking water sampling and analysis. At the time of the new instruction, the chlorine method employed at the Welsh Water Bretton laboratory was unable to meet these requirements, notably for the prescribed limit of detection. This prompted the laboratory to investigate new analytical options for monitoring residual chlorine.

  • UV Technology Offers Solution For Emerging Water Crisis

    Many are turning to UV as an effective barrier to enable the reuse of wastewater, for indirect reuse, and aquifer recharge.

  • Hydrant Pressure Monitoring Application Note

    One of the most popular uses for the Telog Hydrant Pressure Recorders (HPRs) is to monitor and analyze customer pressure complaints. The HPR is ideally suited for this application because it is rugged, highly portable, and can give a complete, time stamped picture of the pressure differential between the customer’s water pressure and the water pressure being delivered by the utility.

  • How To Read An Encoder

    The HR-E LCD encoder has a 9-digit Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) to show consumption, flow and alarm information. The display automatically toggles between 9-digit and 6-digit consumption, rate of flow and meter model.

  • The Importance Of Measuring Total Organic Carbon

    Organic carbon compounds vary greatly. In fact, one of the first lessons in most introductory Organic Chemistry courses explains that the number of possible carbon compounds is virtually infinite due to carbon’s ability to form long, chain-like molecules. While chromatographic methods like gas chromatography (GC) or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are able to make quantitative determinations for specific compounds, the user must first know which specific compounds to look for.

  • Lab Gas Sub-Metering Accuracy Improves With Thermal Flow Meters To Save Money

    Facility administrators will find the advanced ST100 Series Thermal Mass Air/Gas Flow Meter from Fluid Components International (FCI) helps them improve the accuracy of specialty gas point of use and sub-metering operations to achieve accurate billing in their labs for better cost tracking and control.

  • Validation Of Environmental Water Methods On One System

    Water quality laboratories across the nation are faced with both a rising level of water quality awareness amongst the general public, as well as rising costs in water quality monitoring. As a result, laboratories are looking for more efficient ways to provide higher quality monitoring.

  • How To Install A Submersible Pump In Discharge Tubes

    In the fields of water and waste water technology, submersible pumps represent a viable economic and technical alternative to conventional, dry-installed pumps. In particular, they offer a number of handling advantages during maintenance and installation work, a factor of increasing importance in times of general staff cutbacks by operating companies.

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DRINKING WATER PRODUCTS

OptiFiber® Cloth Media Filtration OptiFiber® Cloth Media Filtration

Technology pilot demonstrations can be beneficial to wastewater treatment plants by providing a snapshot of essential process operating conditions and allowing the customer to interact with the technology and factory personnel.

On-Site Services On-Site Services

Do you need support at your system? Our qualified service technicians come to support you on-site.

Leopold® Desalination Pretreatment Systems by Xylem Leopold® Desalination Pretreatment Systems by Xylem
Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane filters are an effective means of producing potable water from seawater. However, RO membranes are intended for removing only salt and dissolved ions
Ultrasonic Flow Meters - Clamp-on Ultrasonic Flow Meters - Clamp-on

The SITRANS FS230 digital clamp-on ultrasonic flow meter is a process-optimizing solution for measuring flow in virtually any liquid application. Designed to provide both exceptional performance and outstanding cost savings, the FS230 is an ideal fit for many industries requiring high-quality liquid flow measurement

Hydrotech Discfilter Hydrotech Discfilter

The Hydrotech Discfilter provides proven experience for today’s demanding wastewater treatment applications through an efficient, yet easy-to-operate design. Influent flows by gravity into the center drum and then passes through the filter media mounted on both sides of the discs.

Capital Controls® CHLOR-A-VAC® Series 1420 Chemical Industion Unit Capital Controls® CHLOR-A-VAC® Series 1420 Chemical Industion Unit

The Series 1420 CHLOR-A-VAC® affords high efficiency addition and mixing of gases and liquid chemicals resulting in substantial chemical cost savings.

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LATEST INSIGHTS ON DRINKING WATER

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DRINKING WATER VIDEOS

Engineers Design New Lead Detector For Water

New sensor offers continuous monitoring, immediate detection of lead.

Tiny Motors That Can Clean Up Polluted Water

Scientists are developing new motors that are tiny and soft. They run on things like light, magnetic effects or chemical solutions. And they can serve specific functions — including cleaning up pollution.

Drought Forum Webinar: The Growing Demand For Re-Used And Brackish Water Drought Forum Webinar: The Growing Demand For Re-Used And Brackish Water

The Western Governors' Drought Forum webinar “Once Marginal, Now Crucial: The Growing Demand for Re-used, Produced, and Brackish Water” explores the technological and regulatory obstacles to utilizing re-used, produced, and brackish water.

Water Reuse in the US: Adoption Trends and Market Growth

Bluefield Research analyst, Erin Bonney Casey, presents on water reuse markets in the U.S. during the WateReuse Association's One Water Innovations Press Workshop at WEFTEC 2014 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Putting Drinking Water To The Test Putting Drinking Water To The Test

Appearing on The Weather Channel's "Wake Up With Al" morning show, water expert Dan Theobald puts drinking water to the test by measuring total dissolved solids (TDS) in tap water samples from Brooklyn, Manhattan, and New Jersey, as well as bottled water samples.

More Drinking Water Videos

ABOUT DRINKING WATER

In most developed countries, drinking water is regulated to ensure that it meets drinking water quality standards. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers these standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)

Drinking water considerations can be divided into three core areas of concern:

  1. Source water for a community’s drinking water supply
  2. Drinking water treatment of source water
  3. Distribution of treated drinking water to consumers

Drinking Water Sources

Source water access is imperative to human survival. Sources may include groundwater from aquifers, surface water from rivers and streams and seawater through a desalination process. Direct or indirect water reuse is also growing in popularity in communities with limited access to sources of traditional surface or groundwater. 

Source water scarcity is a growing concern as populations grow and move to warmer, less aqueous climates; climatic changes take place and industrial and agricultural processes compete with the public’s need for water. The scarcity of water supply and water conservation are major focuses of the American Water Works Association.

Drinking Water Treatment

Drinking Water Treatment involves the removal of pathogens and other contaminants from source water in order to make it safe for humans to consume. Treatment of public drinking water is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. Common examples of contaminants that need to be treated and removed from water before it is considered potable are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

There are a variety of technologies and processes that can be used for contaminant removal and the removal of pathogens to decontaminate or treat water in a drinking water treatment plant before the clean water is pumped into the water distribution system for consumption.

The first stage in treating drinking water is often called pretreatment and involves screens to remove large debris and objects from the water supply. Aeration can also be used in the pretreatment phase. By mixing air and water, unwanted gases and minerals are removed and the water improves in color, taste and odor.

The second stage in the drinking water treatment process involves coagulation and flocculation. A coagulating agent is added to the water which causes suspended particles to stick together into clumps of material called floc. In sedimentation basins, the heavier floc separates from the water supply and sinks to form sludge, allowing the less turbid water to continue through the process.

During the filtration stage, smaller particles not removed by flocculation are removed from the treated water by running the water through a series of filters. Filter media can include sand, granulated carbon or manufactured membranes. Filtration using reverse osmosis membranes is a critical component of removing salt particles where desalination is being used to treat brackish water or seawater into drinking water.

Following filtration, the water is disinfected to kill or disable any microbes or viruses that could make the consumer sick. The most traditional disinfection method for treating drinking water uses chlorine or chloramines. However, new drinking water disinfection methods are constantly coming to market. Two disinfection methods that have been gaining traction use ozone and ultra-violet (UV) light to disinfect the water supply.

Drinking Water Distribution

Drinking water distribution involves the management of flow of the treated water to the consumer. By some estimates, up to 30% of treated water fails to reach the consumer. This water, often called non-revenue water, escapes from the distribution system through leaks in pipelines and joints, and in extreme cases through water main breaks.

A public water authority manages drinking water distribution through a network of pipes, pumps and valves and monitors that flow using flow, level and pressure measurement sensors and equipment.

Water meters and metering systems such as automatic meter reading (AMR) and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) allows a water utility to assess a consumer’s water use and charge them for the correct amount of water they have consumed.