DRINKING WATER CASE STUDIES AND WHITE PAPERS

  • Basin Nozzle Manifold Contacting System Installation Remediates Taste And Odor Compounds, Meets Disinfection Goals

    A water quality audit revealed that two of the largest drinking water plants in the City of Montreal were out of compliance with Quebec’s latest water quality rules. Both drinking water facilities were located in heavily populated areas; consequently, plant modifications had to be accomplished within their existing infrastructure footprints.

  • Simple And Smart: How Radio-Read Meters Are Improving Meter Reading

    When Hank Zwart took over as director of public works in 2014, the city was in the initial phases of installing a walkby system that was eight-year-old technology. Knowing this older metering technology is not the best way forward, Zwart and the City of Prescott decided to implement the latest AMR technology that supports future migration to AMI. To meet this goal, City of Prescott chose Kamstrup’s READy AMR system.

  • PFAS Regulations: What You Need To Know

    As states and the federal government march toward PFAS regulation, it’s only a matter of time before most municipal water systems will be required to address the contaminant. And with the constantly changing patchwork of proposed regulations, meaning the earliest imposed rules will likely evolve, PFAS promises to be a moving target for a long time. Preparing now is the key to be in the best position to maintain compliance.

  • An Economic Solution For Reducing Total Organic Carbon Levels In Surface Water Sources

    Removing total organic carbon (TOC) from drinking water is often a tricky proposition for municipal utilities that rely on surface water sources. Disinfection byproduct rules call for a percentage of removal instead of allowing a maximum contaminant level. Granular activated carbon is a cost-effective way to provide stability in TOC reduction for surface water sources and improve the quality of water in the distribution system.

  • Singer Valve Improves Aussie Water Supply

    Without the right solution, aging water pipes, overflowing tanks and noisy valves can become chronic issues to a water retailer’s supply infrastructure.

  • Improving Wastewater Quality And Reducing OPEX To Support Direct Potable Reuse

    Prolonged droughts and depleted groundwater levels has led El Paso Water (EPW) to develop alternative water sources. After decades operating successful non-potable and indirect potable reuse programs, the municipality will be among the firsts in the US to utilize direct potable reuse (DPR).

  • California Dreamin’? Pilot Study Makes Treating Arsenic, Manganese And Iron A Reality (Loprest)

    A pilot study was conducted for arsenic, manganese, and iron treatment system at a well site. The onsite pilot test demonstrated the performance of the Loprest Water Treatment Company treatment process.

  • Smartphone App Delivers Reproducible And Precise pH Analysis

    Traditionally when it comes to analysis, there have been two ways to measure pH. The first is the inexpensive method of using test strips, which requires little time or training. The second requires the use of a pH electrode or probe and because it requires more training, time, and equipment, is far more expensive. However, a hybrid application is now available that brings together the ease of use of test strips with technology to ensure preciseness.

  • Thrust Resistant Design Of Dead Ends, Valves, Reducers, And Encroaching Restrainted Lengths

    This bulletin describes the restrained length calculations for dead ends, valves, reducers, and sleeves with a discussion of several situations where economics and other factors may favor an alternate restraint method. Consideration overlapping or encroaching restrained lengths and of restrained piping having expansion joints and repair clamps is also discussed.

  • Sensitive Determination Of Iron In Drinking Water, Mineral Water, Groundwater, And Spring Water Using Rapid Photometric Tests

    The quality of drinking water is regulated by a variety of guidelines, such as the EU Council Directive 98/831,2 and WHO guideline. The key principles used to define these limits consider both health hazards and sensory and technical reasons. Iron, for example, does not exhibit a risk for health in concentrations usually found in drinking water.

DRINKING WATER APPLICATION NOTES

  • Protecting Pumps From Dead Head Conditions
    4/6/2017

    The C445 motor management relay offers the most configurable protection options in the industry, with features specifically designed to protect critical pumps from costly damages due to dead-head and other underloaded or starved pump conditions.

  • Panametrics Technology Helps Track Potable Water Leaks
    4/22/2022

    Concerned about the volume of water leakages throughout their network, a Swedish water authority turned to Panametrics flowmeters to map their municipal water network -- enabling quick leak identification and fixes.

  • Accurately Measuring Network Leakage
    6/26/2015

    The pressures of supplying a growing global population mean that the world’s water supplies need to be managed more closely than ever.

  • Determination Of EN15662:2008 - Determination Of Pesticide Residue In Food Of Plant Origin, By An Automated QuEChERS Solution
    9/24/2014

    Pesticide residue laboratories are required to undertake analyses of an ever increasing number of samples. The analyses typically involve use of multi-residue methods (both GC-MS and LC-MS) to test for over 500 pesticide residues.

  • Reduced Bore Electromagnetic Flowmeter
    10/29/2021

    Being able to accurately measure both the quantity and rate of water passing through a water distribution system is crucial to gain an informed understanding of overall efficiency. As such, achieving a measurement that is exact as possible can have a significant impact on key areas. This includes supply planning, maintenance, resource deployment, leakage detection and the overall environment.

  • Application Note: YSI 600 Optical Monitoring System Used To Protect Lake Oconee, Georgia Water Quality
    12/27/2005
    Northern Georgia is experiencing unprecedented development; consequently, water quality in many of its watersheds is in jeopardy of severe degradation. The State of Georgia, Environmental Protection Division (EPD) has implemented an NPDES monitoring and enforcement program designed to prevent construction activities from impacting water quality
  • FLEX-TEND® Flexible Expansion Joints, Features And Specifications
    12/3/2020

    FLEX-TEND® flexible expansion joints are designed to protect structures and pipelines from differential movement whether this movement is earthquake induced or the gradual motion of soil subsidence. This bulletin offers a concise listing and discussion of the important features and materials of the double and single ball assemblies.

  • Waste Technologies Transform Problems To Profit
    9/8/2015

    Anaerobic digestion processes that radically improve the quality of wastewater while delivering green energy extracted from biological waste streams are emerging as a profitable way for agricultural and food processing industries cope with the twin impact of drought and pollution challenges.

  • Control Of Active Chlorine Disinfection By-Products (DBPs) Of Drinking Water Using The THM Plus Method
    4/13/2017

    Determining trihalomethane levels using standard analytical methods requires expensive equipment and highly qualified personnel, which also means that analysis costs are very high. For these reasons, trihalomethane analysis poses a serious problem for companies that supply drinking water. Read the full application note to learn how two drinking water laboratories improved quality control of water delivered to end users.

  • Bottled Water Industry: Liquid Analytical Solutions
    11/10/2013

    Americans consume more than 9.1 billion gallons of bottled water annually - an average of twenty nine gallons per person every year. 

DRINKING WATER PRODUCTS

The Series 1900 is designed for restraining push-on bell and spigot AWWA C909 PVC Pipe. The harness consists of two split serrated restraints one on the spigot end and another behind the bell harnessed together by an array of thrust rods. The Restraint harness is rated to the full pressure of the pipe.

Recordall® Fire Hydrant Meters are designed for use in measuring potable cold water from a fire hydrant or other non-permanent installation where flow is in one direction.

HYMAX GRIP  joins and restrains a wide selection of pipes of different types and diameters, easily and reliably. Due to its patented design, it allows the joining of pipes of the same or different materials and diameters and preventing axial pipe movement.

Harmony Encore is compatible with every* utility billing system on the market that supports the common Flat File Transfer. Harmony Encore together with integrated GoAigua Analytics enhances and amplifies the value from a utility’s CIS, GIS, SCADA, and a wide variety of Asset Management Software.

Automatic self-cleaning filter provides superior efficiency by combining a multi-screen design with Amiad’s proven suction-scanning technology.

Annual filter inspections are a key component to long term, trouble free filter operation. Loprest’s trained service engineers can inspect your treatment system and provide written recommendations for maintenance, improvements and upgrades to keep your filter system operating at its peak performance.

LATEST INSIGHTS ON DRINKING WATER

DRINKING WATER VIDEOS

Architect Kate Orff sees the oyster as an agent of urban change. Bundled into beds and sunk into city rivers, oysters slurp up pollution and make legendarily dirty waters clean — thus driving even more innovation in "oyster-tecture." Orff shares her vision for an urban landscape that links nature and humanity for mutual benefit.

RIP Kitty Hach-Darrow (October 20, 1922 - June 4, 2020), co-founder of Hach Company

A group of Congressional Democratic lawmakers from Michigan has proposed legislation to provide $600 million in financial assistance to help Flint deal with its current water crisis.

Scientists are developing robots that might someday be able to creep through the pitch-black mines to help prevent spills. A 2015 spill from Colorado’s Gold King Mine unleashed 3 million gallons of water that fouled rivers in three states with toxins.

Water scarcity challenges are growing. Manufacturing the products used in our daily lives consumes a large amount of water. Reusing treated wastewater provides the most sustainable source of clean water.

ABOUT DRINKING WATER

In most developed countries, drinking water is regulated to ensure that it meets drinking water quality standards. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers these standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)

Drinking water considerations can be divided into three core areas of concern:

  1. Source water for a community’s drinking water supply
  2. Drinking water treatment of source water
  3. Distribution of treated drinking water to consumers

Drinking Water Sources

Source water access is imperative to human survival. Sources may include groundwater from aquifers, surface water from rivers and streams and seawater through a desalination process. Direct or indirect water reuse is also growing in popularity in communities with limited access to sources of traditional surface or groundwater. 

Source water scarcity is a growing concern as populations grow and move to warmer, less aqueous climates; climatic changes take place and industrial and agricultural processes compete with the public’s need for water. The scarcity of water supply and water conservation are major focuses of the American Water Works Association.

Drinking Water Treatment

Drinking Water Treatment involves the removal of pathogens and other contaminants from source water in order to make it safe for humans to consume. Treatment of public drinking water is mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the U.S. Common examples of contaminants that need to be treated and removed from water before it is considered potable are microorganisms, disinfectants, disinfection byproducts, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals and radionuclides.

There are a variety of technologies and processes that can be used for contaminant removal and the removal of pathogens to decontaminate or treat water in a drinking water treatment plant before the clean water is pumped into the water distribution system for consumption.

The first stage in treating drinking water is often called pretreatment and involves screens to remove large debris and objects from the water supply. Aeration can also be used in the pretreatment phase. By mixing air and water, unwanted gases and minerals are removed and the water improves in color, taste and odor.

The second stage in the drinking water treatment process involves coagulation and flocculation. A coagulating agent is added to the water which causes suspended particles to stick together into clumps of material called floc. In sedimentation basins, the heavier floc separates from the water supply and sinks to form sludge, allowing the less turbid water to continue through the process.

During the filtration stage, smaller particles not removed by flocculation are removed from the treated water by running the water through a series of filters. Filter media can include sand, granulated carbon or manufactured membranes. Filtration using reverse osmosis membranes is a critical component of removing salt particles where desalination is being used to treat brackish water or seawater into drinking water.

Following filtration, the water is disinfected to kill or disable any microbes or viruses that could make the consumer sick. The most traditional disinfection method for treating drinking water uses chlorine or chloramines. However, new drinking water disinfection methods are constantly coming to market. Two disinfection methods that have been gaining traction use ozone and ultra-violet (UV) light to disinfect the water supply.

Drinking Water Distribution

Drinking water distribution involves the management of flow of the treated water to the consumer. By some estimates, up to 30% of treated water fails to reach the consumer. This water, often called non-revenue water, escapes from the distribution system through leaks in pipelines and joints, and in extreme cases through water main breaks.

A public water authority manages drinking water distribution through a network of pipes, pumps and valves and monitors that flow using flow, level and pressure measurement sensors and equipment.

Water meters and metering systems such as automatic meter reading (AMR) and advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) allows a water utility to assess a consumer’s water use and charge them for the correct amount of water they have consumed.