Drinking Water Disinfection [Case Studies White Paper]

  1. MIOX Achieves Increased Efficacy Against Biofilm And Legionella Vs. Common Biocides
    2/5/2014

    Comparative disinfection studies using 3 oxidizing biocides and 3 commonly used non-oxidizing biocides against Legionella pneumophilia.

  2. Burnsville Becomes First Metro System With On‐Site Hypochlorite Generation
    8/15/2016

    When Linda Mullen took over as water superintendent in Burnsville in 2007, the city was in the process of adding surface‐water treatment to its existing plant. Burnsville began purchasing water from the nearby Kraemer Mining and Materials quarry, both to supplement its supply and to help the quarry meet discharge permits.

  3. The UV Uprising: How UV Disinfection Will Claw Its Way To Prominence
    6/20/2014

    Chlorination in all of its forms — gas, liquid, or solid — has been the primary way for treatment plants to disinfect the treated wastewater. The treatment plants that use gas chlorination must face federal regulatory oversight in the form of a Risk Management Program (RMP). Liquid chlorine plants trade in the regulatory oversight for a more expensive and less effective product. While chlorine in its solid form is good for small treatment facilities known as package plants (named for their mobility). However, ultraviolet (UV) technology is rapidly altering the landscape of disinfection throughout the industry.

  4. Systems Work In Series To Increase Filter Run Times, Reduce Water Use, And Improve Finished Water Quality
    3/25/2015

    The city of Florence, Colorado Water Treatment Plant (WTP), located 75 miles south of Denver, uses blended surface water taken from the city’s southernmost water reservoir.

  5. Disinfection Performance Testing Of High-Efficiency Ultraviolet Water Treatment Chamber
    4/16/2014

    This is the second in a series of three white papers describing the design and performance of the NeoTech Aqua ReFlex™ treatment chamber. The first describes in detail the theoretical basis for the very high efficiency demonstrated by the chamber. The third paper describes how this chamber design leads to some highly desirable operational advantages beyond just energy ad cost reduction. By J. R. Cooper, Ph. D. and Gwynne Cavender, NeoTech Aqua Solutions, Inc.

  6. Removal Of Disinfection By-Product With Chlorine Dioxide
    8/9/2016

    This municipality disinfects 1-1.5 million gallons per day of drinking water, and is currently transitioning from a small system serving <10,000 people to a large system serving >10,000 people. Chlorine gas was used as the primary disinfectant for the raw water entering the plant.

  7. Filtration Avoidance in Surface Water - North Tahoe, California (Case Study)
    11/30/2011

    With its mountain beauty and deep, clear waters, Lake Tahoe is one of the most popular vacation spots in the California/Nevada area.

  8. San Diego Plant Cuts THM Levels In Half
    8/3/2017

    The 34 MGD Otay Water Treatment Plant in San Diego, California serves a population of approximately 200,000. It is a conventional treatment plant that uses coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration and disinfection. The plant receives raw water from two different sources — imported water from the Colorado River and runoff water from three local reservoirs.

  9. Technical Support And Service Are Key In A Place “Way Outside Of Ordinary”
    3/20/2018

    Rangely is a remote town with a population of just over 2,200 people located in the upper northwest area of Colorado, thirteen miles from the Utah border. During the course of their routine maintenance, operators noticed problems with a distribution pump. Read the full project profile to learn how Process Solutions’ trained service technicians were able to walk them through a series of diagnostics to further isolate the problem and get the system was back up and running in a short period of time.

  10. WEDECO UV Disinfection Produces Highly Purified Water In Silicon Valley
    5/7/2015

    With diminished rainfall, a depleted aquifer basin, near-empty recharge ponds, and an earthquake-vulnerable aqueduct system, the Santa Clara Valley Water District (SCVWD) in San Jose, CA, required additional water supplies to maintain regional economic vitality for its growing community.