Drinking Water Disinfection [Case Studies White Paper]

  1. Upgrading From Gas Chlorine To On-Site Hypochlorite Generation To Improve Safety And System Resilience
    9/20/2018

    By replacing gas chlorine with on-site hypochlorite generation, Nashville was able to improve the safety and longevity of its water plants to accommodate the growth of the “Heart of Country Music” far into the future. At a recent water conference, Glen Doss, Treatment Plant Manager stated, “In 2016, the last gas chlorine railcar left to large applause.” 

  2. Need More Water? Think Ozone-BAC For 'One Water' Resolution
    8/25/2017

    If you thought reverse osmosis was the one and only choice for potable water reuse, think again. Ozonation followed by biological activated carbon (ozone-BAC) is more suited to inland communities and may be better at removing chemicals of emerging concern (CECs).

  3. Ion Exchange: A Viable Water Treatment Alternative To Membranes
    10/8/2014

    Five decades ago, ion exchange using charged resins was one of two processes used in the water industry for water treatment.

  4. Change To 3-Precursor Vacuum Generator-Feeder For ClO2 In WTP, From Batch Generator Pumping, Cuts Chemical Costs, Gains Plant Management Of Equipment
    1/22/2018

    The water treatment plants (WTP’s) manager for the city of Midlothian, TX reports significant reduction in chemical costs, gaining new management control for their generation and feed equipment, and ending a pesky maintenance burden, by switching to three-precursor vacuum generator-feed, from batch-generator-pumping, for introducing chlorine dioxide (ClO2) into their 8 MGD plant #2. As a result, he plans to make the same change at their 12 MGD plant #1.

  5. Improving The Quality Of Tertiary Effluent For Indirect Potable Reuse With Geographic Constraints
    9/5/2018

    The Mazzei Sidestream Venturi Injection – Pipeline Flash Reactor System provides a feasible alternative for dissolution of ozone at the Clark County Water Reclamation District (CCWRD) in Las Vegas, because it allowed for flexibility in basin design to meet geographic site constraints.

  6. Granular Activated Carbon: A Long-Term Solution For Meeting DPB Compliance
    7/31/2017

    When the Cobb County-Marietta Water Authority (CCMWA) anticipated the need to upgrade the Hugh A. Wyckoff water treatment plant, they turned to granular activated carbon (GAC) technology after vetting several alternatives. The plant, a wholesaler in a two-plant system, processes up to 72 million gallons per day and serves about 350,000 people. Comprising of Wyckoff and the James E. Quarles treatment plant, CCMWA is the second largest water provider in Georgia.

  7. Bulk Hypochlorite Disinfection System Replaced With On-Site Hypochlorite Generation System Saving About $160,000 Per Year In Materials
    7/18/2018

    Originally built to treat 10 million gallons per day (MGD), the Quail Creek Water Treatment Plant in Washington County, Utah, now has an operational capacity of 60 MGD and a design capacity of 80 MGD.

  8. Veteran Potable Water Superintendent Sees Benefits Of Secondary Containment Equipment To Help Enable Use Of Chlorine Gas For Chlorination
    12/27/2017

    A veteran potable water production and treatment superintendent, currently overseeing potable water needs for a federal reservation, reports significant benefit from the availability of secondary containment equipment for chlorine gas storage, as part of a management strategy to help enable the use of that chlorination method. 

  9. A Pilot Study Involving Three Different Treatment Media
    10/8/2018

    As part of a feasibility study for arsenic treatment at an elementary school in California, a pilot study was conducted to test the performance of three different treatment media: (1) greensand and anthracite, (2) standard sand and anthracite, and (3) manganese dioxide.

  10. EPA Researchers Partner With WaterStep To Deliver Clean Water During Emergencies
    9/11/2018

    Following a disaster like the back-to-back hurricanes that hit Texas, Florida, and Puerto Rico in 2017, water systems can become flooded and unable to provide safe drinking water to communities. EPA researchers recognized the need for portable water treatment systems that can quickly and cost-effectively provide safe drinking water to affected communities following a disaster.