Drinking Water Disinfection [Case Studies White Paper]

  1. Clarification And Filtration Upgrades Using ACTIFLO Technology
    1/12/2017

    The City of Somersworth has a historical background dating back to the early 1900s when it became the first community to start using chlorine to disinfect it’s drinking water.

  2. City Of Springfield, MO, Upgrades Disinfection System From Gas Chlorine To On‐Site Sodium Hypochlorite Generation
    7/24/2018

    In April 2013, City Utilities started up three Microclor Model MC‐1500 skid systems, each rated at 1,500 pounds per day of free available chlorine.

  3. Installing Hydro-Guard® Automatic Flushing Saves Rural Texas Town $8,000 A Year
    9/11/2015

    Managed by the private, non-profit South Jasper Water Supply, Buna, Texas’ water system contains 91 miles of un-looped distribution pipe with historical water losses of up to 30%. A small operations team is responsible for monitoring two water plants, reading 700 meters, repairing leaks, and flushing water to control the water quality. In an effort to spend less time manually flushing hydrants and focus more time on repairing leaks to reduce non-revenue water loss, South Jasper Water Supply purchased and installed two (2) Hydro-Guard® HG-1 Basic/S Flushing Systems.

  4. Engineering For Safe Chlorine Disinfection
    6/6/2011

    For more than 75 years chlorine has been effectively used to disinfect drinking water, eliminating dangerous bacteria and toxic compounds. Water supply engineers and treatment facility operators are used to necessary risks and problems associated with chlorine disinfection in order to deliver safe water. By Harland R. Pond, Product Manager; Grundfos

  5. Bulk Hypochlorite Disinfection System Replaced With On-Site Hypochlorite Generation System Saving About $160,000 Per Year In Materials
    7/18/2018

    Originally built to treat 10 million gallons per day (MGD), the Quail Creek Water Treatment Plant in Washington County, Utah, now has an operational capacity of 60 MGD and a design capacity of 80 MGD.

  6. City Solves Reliability And Maintenance Problems For WTP Hypo Feeds
    8/13/2014

    A municipal water quality manager reports replacement of sodium hypochlorite (hypo) vacuum feeder units with a more advanced type at one water treatment plant (WTP) has helped allow for continued reliability for chlorination.

  7. San Diego Plant Cuts THM Levels In Half
    8/3/2017

    The 34 MGD Otay Water Treatment Plant in San Diego, California serves a population of approximately 200,000. It is a conventional treatment plant that uses coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration and disinfection. The plant receives raw water from two different sources — imported water from the Colorado River and runoff water from three local reservoirs.

  8. Performance Of A Conventional Surface Water Plant Using Mixed-Oxidants For Microflocculation And Final Disinfection
    1/20/2009

    The surface water source is from snow-melt and summer thunderstorm run-off from the mountains. This water is detained in McClure Reservoir (7876 ft elevation) and Nichols Reservoir (7483 ft elevation) upstream from the CRWTP, a conventional plant built in 1974 with a design capacity of 8 MGD. Because the City has limited surface water rights, and due to decreased demand, the treatment plant usually shuts down for 60 to 90 days during winter. The reservoirs thaw in spring and turn over in autumn, and during the summer rainy season, raw water turbidities may exceed 5 NTU. By MIOX Corporation

  9. Monochloramine Monitoring – Reliable Analysis, Safer Drinking Water
    6/30/2015

    The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), enacted in 1974, is the main federal law that ensures the quality of Americans' drinking water. Under SDWA, EPA sets standards for drinking water quality and oversees the states, localities, and water suppliers who implement those standards. The law was amended in 1986 & 1996 requiring many actions to protect drinking water and its sources.

  10. Wastewater Plant In Como, Italy, Upgrades To De Nora Ozone For Significant Savings
    9/13/2018

    The Lariana Depur wastewater treatment plant in Fino Mornasco, Italy, treats wastewater from multiple textile manufacturers in the Como region, known as the heart of the textile industry. Since 1994, ozone has been used effectively as a polisher to remove the dark blue-purple color — the result of the dyes used in the textile dyeing and printing process — from the water.