Drinking Water Disinfection [Case Studies White Paper]

  1. Utility Removes Burdensome Bulk Sodium Hypochlorite From Operations
    7/24/2018

    Historically, Lyon County Utilities, Nevada, applied 12.5% bulk sodium hypochlorite for disinfection at each of their well sites. Always looking to improve system efficiency, Lyon County staff reexamined on‐site hypochlorite generation to determine if the use of the 0.8% sodium hypochlorite solution could mitigate the challenges associated with dosing high strength sodium hypochlorite.

  2. The Role Of UV In Solving Next-Generation Water Challenges
    7/4/2013

    The global market for water treatment technologies is growing and becoming increasingly important as the quality and quantity of freshwater sources are stressed and the link between fresh water sources and wastewater — returned to the environment — is more and more obvious. By Rick VanSant, President & CEO, UV Pure Technologies, Inc.

  3. Ozone Disinfection System Lowers Turbidity, Boosts Filter Run Times, And Eliminates Taste And Odor Issues
    3/24/2015

    By 2025 Salt Lake City expects to gain additional 100,000 residents, and the nearby city of Sandy expects to gain another 30,000.

  4. California Mountain Town Cuts Salt Use, Doubles Disinfection
    1/24/2011

    The wastewater treatment facility of the remote mountain resort community of Pinecrest Lake bears the brunt of spring runoff and increased summer demands in the area's beautiful surroundings.

  5. Burnsville Becomes First Metro System With On‐Site Hypochlorite Generation
    7/24/2018

    When Linda Mullen took over as water superintendent in Burnsville in 2007, the city was in the process of adding surface‐water treatment to its existing plant. Burnsville began purchasing water from the nearby Kraemer Mining and Materials quarry, both to supplement its supply and to help the quarry meet discharge permits.

  6. Veteran Potable Water Superintendent Sees Benefits Of Secondary Containment Equipment To Help Enable Use Of Chlorine Gas For Chlorination
    12/27/2017

    A veteran potable water production and treatment superintendent, currently overseeing potable water needs for a federal reservation, reports significant benefit from the availability of secondary containment equipment for chlorine gas storage, as part of a management strategy to help enable the use of that chlorination method. 

  7. Dissolved Air Flotation System Reduces Costs, Improves Process
    3/1/2015

    With the town of Johnstown, CO's, water treatment plant began operating its circular clarifier systems at maximum capacity to meet summer peak demand rates, consultants recommeded increasing plant capacity and using dissolved air flotation technology for their clarification process.

  8. Degas Separator Selected For Wichita Aquifer Storage And Recovery Project
    4/26/2017

    In the 1990s, the City of Wichita, KS, developed a water supply plan that included creating a sustainable water supply through the year 2050. The key component of the plan is recharging the large aquifer that lies under the region with 100 MGD of water from the Little Arkansas River.

  9. On-Site Disinfection Generation Enables City To Provide High Quality Water For Industrial Food Processing Customers
    7/13/2018

    The city of Buhl, Idaho, obtains all of its drinking water from groundwater sources through multiple wells. Prior to 2009, the city did not treat the groundwater but only added chlorine in the form of bulk 12.5% sodium hypochlorite to provide a disinfectant residual. A combination of factors including: changes in EPA and state DEQ regulatory requirements, growth of the residential population and growth of the industrial food processing customers forced the City to build a new water treatment plant to provide filtration to address the naturally occurring arsenic present in the groundwater.

  10. Reservoir Overcomes Toxic Algae Issue
    6/16/2015

    A Nebraska reservoir was experiencing toxic algae in its water. Constructed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) primarily as a flood control reservoir with recreation and irrigation as secondary uses, the reservoir has a surface area of 700+ acres with an average depth of almost 12 feet.