Drinking Water Measurement White Papers and Case Studies

  1. What Lies Within… What You Need To Know About Hardness Monitoring
    9/12/2017

    Water hardness can wreak havoc on your boilers, creating holes in tubes, eating away at the walls. To keep the hardness at bay, you’re going to need to monitor the levels of calcium and magnesium seeping into your system.  There are things you need to know to ensure that you are doing this properly. First, use an automated system to increase reaction time to hardness. Next, monitor the softeners; they are critical in keeping the system functioning. Last, learn the temperament of your individual boiler; no two are alike.  

  2. WSSC Achieves Over 60% Reduction In Hydraulic Plan Review for Water And Wastewater Systems
    12/1/2016

    Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC) Development Services Group reviews hydraulic plans for approximately 160 proposed development plans per year. This includes water and sewer system extensions as well as approximately 172 small-site utility plans (commercial private systems) that connect to the existing water and sewer network in two large Maryland counties.

  3. Sensing The Future: Water Technology’s 'Holy Grail'
    2/24/2014

    Real-time contaminant detection, featuring a network of sensors throughout the distribution network, is poised to revolutionize the water industry.

  4. FMCW Or ToF? Which Radar Level Technology Is Best For Tank Gauging In Custody Transfer Applications?
    4/9/2018

    Measuring the level of tanks used to hold fluids for custody transfer can be expensive. This is not due to the cost of the measurement instrumentation, but to what inaccurate measurements can cost the company. Picking the right instrumentation for applications is important. Which radar level technology should you choose for tank gauging in custody transfer applications? Frequency Modulated Continuous Waveform (FMCW) or pulsed Time-of-Flight (ToF or PToF).

  5. More Than Precise Measuring
    5/15/2009

    Electromagnetic flowmeters (magmeters) presently make up 30% of the European flowmeter market. Even though the measuring principle has been in use for more than 30 years, industry experts still figure there is annual growth of more than 2%. This can be attributed to the versatility and largely independent nature of viscosity, density, pressure, and temperature of the flowing medium.

  6. Digital Engineering Models Enable Comprehensive Lifecycle Information Management For Water And Wastewater Treatment Plants
    4/17/2018

    Water and wastewater treatment plant design is a large scale, complex engineering effort that requires a multi-discipline design team, often spread across many offices, and involving collaboration among different consulting firms, contractors, and owners.

  7. (Ultra)Sound Opportunities For Aging Metering Infrastructure
    7/30/2018

    Most people accept that major purchases in life — e.g., housing, automobiles, appliances — come with cyclical budgeting impacts that require amortizing costs over the long term, through savings or borrowing. Why should anyone expect the national water infrastructure to be any different?

  8. Automatic In-Situ Verification Of Accuracy For CoriolisMaster Mass Flowmeters
    5/9/2017

    Users often question whether their measuring devices are working properly and within specified measurement accuracy. The new CoriolisMaster flowmeter models by ABB include technology for integrated online diagnosis and accuracy verification. This technology constantly monitors the oscillating meter tube within the flowmeter for erosion and coating deposits.

  9. Six Top Factors To Consider When Selecting A Flow Meter
    7/13/2018

    Water utilities rely on accurate and dependable flow measurement for critical process controls. Regulatory agencies also require flow monitoring and reporting, with specific accuracy limits.

  10. North Carolina Treatment Plant Eliminates Taste And Odor Issues With Ozonation
    3/9/2015

    Enactment of the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule and the Stage 2 Disinfectant-Disinfection Byproduct Rule (D/DBPR) will require both large and small drinking water utilities to reduce total organic carbon (TOC), Cryptosporidium, and disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in the treated drinking water distributed to the public.