Drinking Water Measurement White Papers and Case Studies

  1. Maximizing Your ROI On Test Equipment
    5/7/2012

    In today’s economic climate, it’s tempting to want to buy the cheapest test equipment you can now. But, how can you tell what the true cost of test equipment is? You have to consider how widely your water and chemical consumption will vary as the readings on your instrumentation does. By Heather Rekalske, Myron L Company

  2. A More Efficient Approach To EPA Stage 2 DBP Compliance
    4/20/2018

    Everyone wants pathogen-free drinking water, and adding chlorine is a great way to get it. Unfortunately, the dirtier a water treatment plant (WTP)’s raw water inflow — in terms of natural organic matter (NOM) or microbial organisms — the more disinfection byproducts (DBPs) the chlorination process will generate in the form of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Those DBPs increase the risk of non-compliance with the U.S. EPA’s Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rules. Choosing the right instrumentation to measure NOM through spectral absorption coefficients (SACs) can have a big impact on treatment strategies — in terms of both costs and compliance performance.

  3. Ultrasonic Vs. Radar Level Technology In The Water Industry
    3/13/2017

    In recent years, the debate about which technology is best suited for water and wastewater level measurement and monitoring is heating up. There are those who argue that ultrasonic level technology has been uncontested as the standard for level and open-channel measurement applications in the water industry.

  4. Article: A Practical Solution For Real-Time Organic Monitoring
    12/19/2008
    Monitoring organics continuously provides instantaneous water quality data that is vital for several of the most common water and wastewater treatment applications.
  5. What's Faulty — Your Treatment Or Your Testing?
    9/29/2017

    The primary reason for laboratory testing at a water or wastewater plant is to determine if the facilities are meeting regulatory limits. Both proper operation and accurate testing are of utmost importance to ensure compliance. However, regulators and operators must consider limitations of the test methodology, as they may affect analysis results. The last thing any plant manager wants is unwarranted problems as a result of faulty analysis.

  6. From Zero To 2 Million
    4/29/2016

    Since 1977, Endress+Hauser has produced over two million electromagnetic flowmeters. That is more than any other manufacturer. “This magic number stands for high-quality measuring technology and, above all, satisfied customers in all kinds of industries,” says Bernd-Josef Schäfer, Managing Director of Endress+Hauser Flowtec AG, the center of competence for flow measuring technology.

  7. Lightning Fast Response Prevents Extended Down Time
    7/29/2015

    The City of Gordon Texas’s drinking water facility was struck by lightning. Thinking long term, and desiring the latest technology available, the City took this opportunity to upgrade their on-line instrumentation with a range of new continuous monitoring on-line instruments including chlorine analyzers, pH monitoring, temperature monitoring, and turbidity monitoring.

  8. Are Test Strips Still Relevant For Water Analysis?
    9/26/2017

    Today’s environmental laboratories are audited and accredited companies where quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) reign. Advanced technology is needed to measure parameters for regulatory compliance down to parts per billion. In a world of regulatory mandates, can test strips still be used for water analysis?

  9. Sensing The Future: Water Technology’s 'Holy Grail'
    2/24/2014

    Real-time contaminant detection, featuring a network of sensors throughout the distribution network, is poised to revolutionize the water industry.

  10. Electromagnetic Flowmeter Brings Stability To Potentially Rocky Sand Pumping Application
    6/7/2007

    Most flowmeters are delivering perfectly accurate results when pumping water. But when you add rocks or sand to the mix, this can figuratively muddy the waters and create noise that leads to instability and false readings