Drinking Water Measurement White Papers and Case Studies

  1. Carbon Dioxide For pH Control Of Landfill Leachate
    6/16/2016

    A landfill operator’s leachate treatment plant in Missouri required pH reduction following lime-softening and prior to the biological wastewater treatment process. Carbon dioxide (CO2) was chosen as a substitute for sulfuric acid due to improved process control and a reduced tendency to form scale.

  2. Chicago Suburb Ensures Highest Water Quality Year-Round, Saves On Labor And Reagents With New Chlorine Analyzers
    5/18/2015

    For the Village of Lombard’s Water Division, consistently delivering high-quality tap water to the community’s nearly 44,000 residents and the businesses serving them was once quite a juggling act: constantly fixing old, temperamental analyzers; feeding reagents into the old analyzers; and staying ahead of callers complaining about “musty” water tastes and odors. Not today.

  3. Chloramination Monitoring And Control
    7/15/2015

    Since the EPA has established that, together with free chlorine, monochloramine is a primary disinfectant, it has been possible to implement the process more intensively. Water that is treated with monochloramine has, depending on the source of the water, fewer problems concerning taste and odor than water treated with free chlorine. In addition, the chemically more stable monochloramine remains longer in the water, thus allowing a long-term disinfecting effect.

  4. Point Versus Continuous Level Measuring Technologies
    11/7/2017

    While point level measuring approaches are regarded as simple and user friendly, they lack the capabilities of more sophisticated continuous measuring instruments.

  5. Monitoring Raw Water Turbidity – What’s Important!
    3/27/2018

    Monitoring raw water turbidity is important to inform the operator of significant changes in water quality, especially turbidity, allowing the operator to make process chemistry changes to respond to the increasing raw water turbidity. Variations in raw water present turbidity measurement challenges different from those found elsewhere in a typical treatment plant.

  6. Technology Advancements Improving Real Time Spectral Analysis
    11/15/2012

    Real time spectrophotometers offer the immediate detection capability of a wide range of important and emerging contaminants of concern.

  7. How To Avoid System Downtime When Installing Flow Meters
    7/11/2018

    Water and wastewater utilities rely on accurate flow measurement for important process controls. These may include recycle streams, chemical dosing systems, and other operational functions. In addition, regulators require utilities to measure certain flows, such as treatment plant influent and effluent and potable water pumping. Accurate flow measurement is also important for monitoring and reducing unaccounted-for water.

  8. Turbiwell Comparision Report Before And After Upgrade
    7/29/2015

    Russellville water treatment plant is a surface water plant using traditional clarification, filtration, and treatment. The plant historically has used traditional contact turbidimeters that employ tungsten lamps that required quarterly maintenance, but replaced their turbidimeters with Swan Turbiwell turbidimeters in 2012. Read the full report for a comparison of the performance of the Swan Turbiwell to the previously installed turbidimeters. 

  9. Improving Flow Measurement Accuracy With Flow Conditioners
    12/1/2017

    When looking for a way to reduce plant operating costs, one of the potentially simplest and often least expensive solutions is to measure liquid and gas flow more accurately. Plant upgrade projects that focus on the continuous improvement of flow measurement and control can trim overall production costs by eliminating waste and reducing maintenance costs.

  10. Utilizing A Phosphate Analyzer To Monitor And Control Chemical Feed Reduces Operating Costs And Improves Reliability
    2/6/2014

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), which provides for the enhancement of the safety of public drinking water supplies through the establishment and enforcement of nationwide drinking water regulations. Congress gave the primary responsibility for establishing regulations to the U. S. EPA.   Until 1990, the EPA administered a certification process for chemicals, including phosphates, to be used for potable water treatment. By Randy C. Turner, Technical Director, Swan Analytical USA