Water and Wastewater Solutions For The Oil and Gas Industry

  1. Discfilters Treat Up To 12,000 gpm Of Secondary Sewage For Cooling Water
    10/26/2016

    The client is one of the largest combined electric and gas companies in the United States, servicing 1.8 million gas customers and 2.2 million electric customers in more than 300 urban, suburban and rural communities. Following a successful site visit, the Client contracted Veolia for the treatment of up to 2725m³/h (12,000 gpm) of sewage plant effluent for cooling tower make-up.

  2. Fracking Wastewater Recycled In Four Innovative Steps
    5/14/2014

    Florida-based company Ozonix developed a new chemical-free system that uses four disinfection technologies­ to treat and recycle flowback and produced water for use as fracturing fluid.

  3. Wastewater Treatment In Oil Refineries
    3/22/2018

    Refineries are among the major consumers of water that has both process and non-process origins. The average refinery requires 2.5 gallons of water for every gallon of crude oil processed. Depending on the type of crude oil, composition of condensate and treatment processes, the characteristics of refinery wastewater varies widely. The design and operation of modern refinery wastewater treatment plants are challenging and are driven by technology. This article will highlight the most common types of waste streams in a refinery and suitable wastewater treatment strategies.

  4. Fuel and Fuel Additives (Fact Sheet)
    2/22/2011

    The fuels that propel modern society have been found in water supplies all over the world. By Trojan Technologies

  5. Electrocoagulation Provides Economical Solution To Oil And Gas Waste Problem
    10/4/2016

    A new generation of electrocoagulation-based water treatment has successfully treated wastewater and effluent from a remote onshore natural gas exploration and production project with over three years of continuous operation. To compound the challenges of treating this wastewater and effluent, the unit was required to operate in an extremely environmentally sensitive environment — a pristine tropical rainforest.

  6. The Big Fracking Question: Is Drinking Water At Risk?
    12/5/2014

    Understanding the impacts of hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) on source water, in both quantity and quality, is of vital importance to industry, the economy, and society. The latest research on the subject is presented, along with possible solutions to help overcome known and potential problems.

  7. Is My Pump Operating At Its Optimum Rate?
    11/16/2017

    An optimized pump and slurry system can make or break a business in the Canadian Oil Sands. Costing up to $100,000 per hour due to lost production, it’s no secret that sites plagued by frequent shutdowns, pump malfunctions, or constant parts replacements struggle to control costs.

  8. BlueTech Forum Reveals Water Technology Future
    5/17/2016

    Technologies which could transform the shape of the water industry of the future will be on show at the fifth BlueTech Forum, to be held in San Francisco.

  9. From The 1970s To Today – 4 Key Advances In Coriolis Flow Measurement
    11/8/2017

    Since the first Coriolis flow sensors were introduced to the marketplace in the 1970s, the technology has evolved considerably. As the installed base for Coriolis grew, the sensors were being called upon to deliver data in environments with increasing levels of complexity. This meant that Coriolis sensors had to adapt and conform to a dizzying array of ever-changing installation requirements, process conditions, communication formats, and configuration parameters. The following article highlights four key advances in Coriolis flow measurement’s journey from the 1970s to today.

  10. Pacing A Hydrocarbon Sampler With No Plant Downtime
    1/29/2016

    An oil refinery in the Southwest United States needed to sample diesel flow during shipment to ensure that the product characteristics were uniform throughout the batch. A local hydrocarbon sampler company provided a pressurized sampler. However, a flowmeter would also be necessary to pace the taking of the diesel sample with the flow.