Drinking Water Treatment Application Notes

  1. New Water Turbidity Measurement Technology — The US Experience
    2/3/2017

    The amount of insoluble matter present in drinking water is an essential quality indicator. Silt, sand, bacteria, spores, and chemical precipitates all contribute to the cloudiness or turbidity of water. Drinking water (DW) which is highly turbid can be unpalatable and unsafe. Consumption of even low concentrations of certain bacteria and other microorganisms can cause serious health effects. Consequently, an accurate and sensitive measurement of turbidity is vital for ensuring that drinking water is free of these contaminants.

  2. Accurate Flowmetering For Enhanced Water Network Performance
    5/9/2017

    Being able to accurately measure both the quantity and rate of water passing through a water distribution system is crucial to gaining an informed understanding of overall efficiency. As such, achieving a measurement that is exact as possible can have a significant impact on key areas including supply planning, maintenance and resource deployment, leakage detection and rectification and the overall environment, in terms of controlling abstraction and reducing unnecessary draw on natural resources.

  3. Application Note: Miami Conservancy District Uses Nitrate Screening As Conjunctive Management Tool
    1/20/2010
    Tasked with monitoring a watershed covering nearly 4,000 square miles, almost 2,300 miles of rivers and streams, and a huge aquifer that provides drinking water for more than 1.2 million people, water quality monitoring specialists at the Miami Conservancy District (MCD) in Dayton, Ohio, have their hands full. By YSI
  4. Application Note: Busseron Creek Watershed Partnership Addresses Concerns In A Rural Watershed
    1/20/2010
    As with other watershed organizations, the Busseron Creek Watershed Partnership (BCWP) exists because of surface water quality degradation. In this case, those waters drain 163,231 acres of a watershed that crosses the boundaries of Vigo, Clay, Green, and Sullivan counties in West- Central Indiana. By YSI
  5. Determination Of EN15662:2008 - Determination Of Pesticide Residue In Food Of Plant Origin, By An Automated QuEChERS Solution
    9/24/2014

    Pesticide residue laboratories are required to undertake analyses of an ever increasing number of samples. The analyses typically involve use of multi-residue methods (both GC-MS and LC-MS) to test for over 500 pesticide residues.

  6. Real-Time Conductivity Monitoring Estimates Chloride Levels In Minnesota Watershed By Using The Aqua TROLL 200
    11/18/2011
    Monitoring deicing chemical levels can help researchers, city governments, and regulatory agencies understand runoff impacts on surface water, groundwater, and surrounding environments.
  7. Application Note: YSI 600 Optical Monitoring System Used To Protect Lake Oconee, Georgia Water Quality
    12/27/2005
    Northern Georgia is experiencing unprecedented development; consequently, water quality in many of its watersheds is in jeopardy of severe degradation. The State of Georgia, Environmental Protection Division (EPD) has implemented an NPDES monitoring and enforcement program designed to prevent construction activities from impacting water quality
  8. Determination Of Pesticide Residue In Vegetables
    9/10/2014

    QuEChERS is a Quick-Easy-Cheap-Effective-Rugged-Safe extraction method that has been developed for the determination of pesticide residues in agricultural commodities.

  9. Ultrapure Water For Determination of Toxic Elements In Environmental Analyses
    4/10/2018

    In this paper the importance of reagent water quality for toxic element environmental analyses is discussed, and the suitability of fresh ultrapure water produced using MilliporeSigma water purification systems for ICP-OES and ICP-MS trace element analyses in environmental laboratories is demonstrated.

  10. Flow Meter Enhances Chlorination System Performance For Municipal Water Department
    12/12/2017

    The water municipality at a mid-size city in the Western region of the U.S. serving a population of about 180,000 people needed to address a chlorine disinfection system problem at one of its water treatment plants.