Drinking Water Treatment Application Notes

  1. Determination Of Pesticide Residue In Vegetables
    9/10/2014

    QuEChERS is a Quick-Easy-Cheap-Effective-Rugged-Safe extraction method that has been developed for the determination of pesticide residues in agricultural commodities.

  2. Network Monitors Water Quality In Shale Gas Drilling Region
    9/2/2011
    High-pressure injection of water, sand, and chemicals that fracture shale deposits deep underground to free trapped natural gas is employed by drillers tapping the Marcellus shale beds, a geologic deposit that stretches from central New York to Virginia and contains gas believed to be worth hundreds of billions of dollars. By YSI
  3. Monitoring Aromatic Organics For Optimizing Coagulation
    2/1/2013

    With the increasing awareness about the negative effects of organics within the water and wastewater treatment process along with increasingly strict water quality regulations, the need for more effective organics removal is becoming more important.

  4. Application Note: YSI Water Quality Monitoring Buoys Help Connecticut DOT Protect The Housatonic River
    12/27/2005
    When replacement of the Sikorski Bridge spanning the Housatonic River was authorized, Paul Corrente and the Connecticut Department of Transportation (CT-DOT) set about the design and development of a water quality monitoring program to monitor the contractor’s in-water activities to insure full protection of the river from perturbation
  5. Control Of Active Chlorine Disinfection By-Products (DBPs) Of Drinking Water Using The THM Plus Method
    4/13/2017

    Determining trihalomethane levels using standard analytical methods requires expensive equipment and highly qualified personnel, which also means that analysis costs are very high. For these reasons, trihalomethane analysis poses a serious problem for companies that supply drinking water. Read the full application note to learn how two drinking water laboratories improved quality control of water delivered to end users.

  6. Activated Carbon And Adsorption Of Trichloroethylene (TCE) And Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)
    12/30/2013

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) and Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are two of the most common solvents that contaminate groundwater supplies in the United States. Both solvents see frequent use in the extraction of fat, in the textile industry, in the production of various pharmaceutical and chemical products. TCE is also used as a degreaser from fabricated metal parts, and PCE serves as a component of aerosol dry-cleaning solvents.

  7. ABB Aztec 600 Manganese Analyzer Optimizing Manganese Removal Efficiency
    11/15/2017

    The task of managing the quantity and quality of potable water is unimaginable without online instrumentation to help water utilities to measure, treat and deliver drinking water to consumers. ABB’s Aztec 600 colorimetric and ion-selective electrode (ISE) analyzers have been designed to measure the key parameters that affect water quality – aluminium, iron, manganese, phosphate, color, ammonia and fluoride.

  8. Capturing Ammonia In Flue Gas Condensate Treatment For Biomass Power Stations With 3M™ Liqui-Cel™ Membrane Contactors
    8/10/2017

    Heat and power generation in biofuel engine cogeneration plants has become increasingly important as process industries look for more economical and environmentally friendly ways to produce energy.

  9. Application Note: Continuous Monitoring Of Drinking Water Provides Assurance Of Safety
    9/28/2005
    A water utility in Ohio wanted to learn more about the variability of water quality parameters such as pH, ORP, turbidity, and chlorine. Previously, most of these parameters had been measured by spot sampling protocols with only a few measurements during a daily period. In order to more accurately assess the water variability, the utility used a YSI 6920DW Drinking Water Multiprobe
  10. New Water Turbidity Measurement Technology — The US Experience
    2/3/2017

    The amount of insoluble matter present in drinking water is an essential quality indicator. Silt, sand, bacteria, spores, and chemical precipitates all contribute to the cloudiness or turbidity of water. Drinking water (DW) which is highly turbid can be unpalatable and unsafe. Consumption of even low concentrations of certain bacteria and other microorganisms can cause serious health effects. Consequently, an accurate and sensitive measurement of turbidity is vital for ensuring that drinking water is free of these contaminants.