Drinking Water Distribution White Papers and Case Studies

  1. The 450 MHz Band: Security, Reach, And Reliability For Smart Water Metering
    7/14/2015

    Since the early 1980s, the 900 MHz frequency band has been widely used for wireless communications in consumer, business, and municipal applications.

  2. New Technology Is 'Groundbreaking Advancement' In Corrosion Control
    3/19/2014

    V-Bio Polyethylene Encasement is the latest scientific advancement in corrosion control for ductile iron pipe.  Its revolutionary formulation allows for complete confidence on the part of the owner, engineer and municipality that no matter how aggressive the soils, the rugged iron pipe installed will last for generations.  This new technology builds on more than 50 years of research and development by the Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association.  By Jordan Byrd, AMERICAN Ductile Iron Pipe

  3. Hydrant Humor: Tales From The Field
    4/12/2018

    District Sales Engineer Andy Singer has spent enough time troubleshooting problems in the field that not much surprises him anymore. When it comes to dry barrel fire hydrants, though, he still gets a chuckle out of some of his more outrageous experiences. Here is his educational and entertaining take on the care and maintenance of fire hydrants, and ways to maximize a utility’s return on what potentially can be a 50+-year infrastructure investment.

  4. New 23-Mile San Antonio Water Pipeline Wins Industry Award
    2/6/2014

    A water pipeline extension recently completed for the San Antonio Water System (SAWS) is the largest high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe project of its type ever done in North America according to the Plastics Pipe Institute, Inc. (PPI).  The $149 million, Regional Carrizo Project undertaken to provide water to 60,000 homes by late 2013, was named Project of the Year for PPI's Municipal and Industrial Division.  PPI is the major trade association representing all segments of the plastic pipe industry.

  5. Lightning Fast Response Prevents Extended Down Time
    7/29/2015

    The City of Gordon Texas’s drinking water facility was struck by lightning. Thinking long term, and desiring the latest technology available, the City took this opportunity to upgrade their on-line instrumentation with a range of new continuous monitoring on-line instruments including chlorine analyzers, pH monitoring, temperature monitoring, and turbidity monitoring.

  6. Fort Benning Brings In The Big Guns: AMERICAN Zinc And American-Darling
    12/1/2015

    Columbus Water Works (CWW) provides drinking water and wastewater services to more than 250,000 residents in the Columbus, GA, area. In 2004, Fort Benning and Columbus Water Works signed an agreement that said CWW would provide water and wastewater services for the military base for 50 years, requiring a connection of the two systems and several large upgrades.

  7. R450 System Grabs More Info From The Inflow
    1/7/2014

    The City of Clermont, Florida is located in Lake County 22 miles west of Orlando; and, like its neighbor, has an economy driven largely by tourism.

  8. Drinking Water Plant Replaced 30 Year Old Carbon Steel Piping With PVC
    2/17/2016

    The city of Virovitica in Croatia is located near to the Hungarian border. Its water works company Virkom serves approximately 20.000 people daily with drinking water. In order to assure required European potable water standards, Virkom decided in 2008 to replace the existing old sand filtration units (total flow rate approx. 320 m³/h) by new ones.

  9. AMERICAN Spiral-Welded Steel Pipe And Big Easy Flood Control
    11/4/2014

    If you think Hurricane Katrina was the first time New Orleans suffered major flood damage, think again. Flooding has been as much a part of New Orleans’ 300-year history as jazz, jambalaya and French Quarter juke joints.

  10. Known For “Healing Waters,” Pagosa Springs Restores Its Potable Water System With Help From SolarBee® Mixers
    10/8/2014

    Located in the high desert plateau of southwestern Colorado, Pagosa Springs is famous for its geothermal hot springs, which draw visitors worldwide to soak in the mineral-rich water. The Utes called the sulfur springs “Pah-gosah,” meaning “healing waters.” You might say the town’s potable water system is healed now as well.