Drinking Water Distribution White Papers and Case Studies

  1. Straining To Make Diaphragm Operated Automatic Control Valves Effective
    2/19/2014

    Diaphragm Operated Automatic Control Valves (ACVs) require reasonably clean water to function effectively and reliably.  Having a strainer upstream of the actual ACV is very important, but also having a smaller strainer located at the inlet of the pilot system on the ACV is also well advised. By Brad Clarke,VP Sales and Marketing, Singer Valve

  2. For Pierre, South Dakota, ALPHA's Single-Bolt Install Is the 'Way to Go'
    8/3/2017

    Add Pierre, South Dakota, to the rapidly growing list of early adopters of AMERICAN Flow Control’s valves and hydrants with ALPHA restrained joint ends. Introduced last year, ALPHA saves labor, time and money.

  3. The End Is Near For FOG Deposits
    10/18/2013

    DO2E has designed and patented the "Little John Digester" for complete removal of FOG deposits of FOG deposits and H2S waste water.

  4. Echologics: 27” Cast Iron Joint Leak Discovered In Bristol, England
    1/27/2014

    This leak was discovered using LeakFinderRT with surface mounted sensors. The total sensor-to-sensor spacing was 450 m (1,480 ft).

  5. Ultrasonic Metering For Small Water Meter Applications
    9/19/2013

    For many years, ultrasonic metering has been utilized for large scale liquid and gas measurement. However, it is a relatively new technology for small meter applications — particularly those designed for potable water.

  6. Melaka Gets Tough On Non Revenue Water Loss And Claims Two Awards With Outstanding Results
    12/13/2016

    Melaka is a relatively small state on the southwest side of the Malay Peninsula with a city so rich in history and beauty that it is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site. With a population around 850,000, the Melaka Water Company Ltd. (SAMB) manages roughly 270,000 service connections for commercial and residential customers.

  7. 4 Tips For Building Meter-Related Revenue
    4/20/2010
    The water meter industry operates on revenue and the modern utility is both a business and a public service. This article deals with the business and revenue side of the water industry. I don’t question the ability of the modern water utility to produce safe, high-quality water. However, I am concerned about the service side, since fairness to the end users of our product and fairness to the utilities who produce this very high-quality product is important and closely related to the revenue issues. It is our job to collect the revenue to which we are entitled by the application of fair business practices and the use of accurate and cost-saving measurement devices. I will talk about building revenue by avoiding revenue loss. By Floyd S. Salser, Jr., CEO, MARS Company
  8. Full Article: Leak Detection And Prevention Programs — Yesterday And Today
    7/3/2007

    From the early 1800’s, when water mains were made of wooden logs from hemlock or elm trees and joined together with bituminous pitch or tar at the joints, to current day versions made of cast iron, ductile iron, PVC, asbestos, cement, and pressurized concrete, all have had one thing in common: they leak. It is impossible to develop a water distribution system that will not leak because of factors such as pipe material, construction methods, soil conditions, external traffic loading changes, internal and external corrosion, and previous leaks. Water works personnel have known this fact since the first pipes were laid

  9. One Of The Nation’s Best: Des Moines Water Works Incorporates Successful Fixed-Network AMR
    10/9/2008

    Deeply nestled in the state of Iowa’s capital city, Des Moines Water Works (DMWW) is ranked one of the nation’s best-operated water systems for continuously meeting the high expectations and future needs of its customers and municipal governments.

  10. Fountain Valley, California Beats Water Reduction Goal With Sensus Technology
    4/19/2017

    Dried up reservoirs, cracked dirt and empty swimming pools are just a few of the visual reminders of the ongoing California drought. But what most people don’t see is the water providers, like Mark Sprague at the City of Fountain Valley, working tirelessly to keep the water running.