Drinking Water Distribution White Papers and Case Studies

  1. Increase Revenue With New Commercial Metering Technology
    4/10/2017

    Revenue for water utilities is circling the drain. Most commercial water meters can stand up to the high water flow of commercial water customers, but these same meters often have a hard time measuring low water flows and retaining accurate meter reads over time and continuous flow conditions. Grocery stores, for example, do not pay for the scant amount of water used for produce misters because it passes through many commercial water meters without detection. These low flows add up to big dollars and are forcing water utilities to take a hard look at the accuracy of their meter fleet.

  2. 3 Keys To Flow Meters As Water Management Tools
    2/25/2016

    In an era when water scarcity, water quality and delivery costs are becoming urgent problems worldwide, the flow meter is more important than ever as a water management tool.    “You can’t manage what you don’t measure,” is a simple business truism, which summarizes the growing role of flow meters in many water process applications.

  3. Non-Revenue Water Is A Money Pit. Here’s Your Way Out
    5/26/2017

    According to the U.S. EPA, $97 billion will be needed over the next two decades to control water loss, comprising 29 percent of the needed upgrade costs in the space overall. The agency estimates that average water loss for a system is 16 percent, with 75 percent of that being recoverable.

  4. AMERICAN Spiral-Welded Steel Pipe And Big Easy Flood Control
    11/4/2014

    If you think Hurricane Katrina was the first time New Orleans suffered major flood damage, think again. Flooding has been as much a part of New Orleans’ 300-year history as jazz, jambalaya and French Quarter juke joints.

  5. Full Article: Leak Detection And Prevention Programs — Yesterday And Today
    7/3/2007

    From the early 1800’s, when water mains were made of wooden logs from hemlock or elm trees and joined together with bituminous pitch or tar at the joints, to current day versions made of cast iron, ductile iron, PVC, asbestos, cement, and pressurized concrete, all have had one thing in common: they leak. It is impossible to develop a water distribution system that will not leak because of factors such as pipe material, construction methods, soil conditions, external traffic loading changes, internal and external corrosion, and previous leaks. Water works personnel have known this fact since the first pipes were laid

  6. Article: Smart Meters Teach Consumers About Water Usage
    5/23/2011
    Homeowners often go to great lengths to conserve electricity or use less gas or oil to heat their homes. By Joel Hoiland, CEO, Utilimetrics
  7. A Guide To Eliminating Pipe Breaks
    1/11/2017

    Call it what you want, but a busted pipe spells nothing but T-R-O-U-B-L-E.

  8. How Can Public Water Utilities Save On Energy Costs?
    9/18/2017

    I think that in this day and age, everyone knows a variety of ways to conserve at least a little bit of energy and save money while doing so. This is true at home, and across any industry. Take for instance the energy consumption across the United States just in the water treatment process. With thousands of water public utilities across the nation, the amount of energy usage is significant enough to make the statistical charts. 

  9. One Of The Nation’s Best: Des Moines Water Works Incorporates Successful Fixed-Network AMR
    10/9/2008

    Deeply nestled in the state of Iowa’s capital city, Des Moines Water Works (DMWW) is ranked one of the nation’s best-operated water systems for continuously meeting the high expectations and future needs of its customers and municipal governments.

  10. Turbiwell Comparision Report Before And After Upgrade
    7/29/2015

    Russellville water treatment plant is a surface water plant using traditional clarification, filtration, and treatment. The plant historically has used traditional contact turbidimeters that employ tungsten lamps that required quarterly maintenance, but replaced their turbidimeters with Swan Turbiwell turbidimeters in 2012. Read the full report for a comparison of the performance of the Swan Turbiwell to the previously installed turbidimeters.