Wastewater Measurement

  1. Internet Of Water To Tackle Growing Water Risks
    7/13/2018

    Flanders pioneers the internet of Water, a unique intelligent water management system based on a network of connected sensors, that enables a permanent and real time follow-up of water quality and water quantity. This internet of Water will enable Flanders to tackle the growing threat of water inconvenience, water scarcity and water pollution.

  2. Six Top Factors To Consider When Selecting A Flow Meter
    7/13/2018

    Water utilities rely on accurate and dependable flow measurement for critical process controls. Regulatory agencies also require flow monitoring and reporting, with specific accuracy limits.

  3. How Calibration Impacts Flow Meter Performance
    7/12/2018

    Utility managers and operators rely on flow meters to provide critical information for process monitoring and control. They require and fully expect the flow data to be accurate and reproducible.

  4. How To Avoid System Downtime When Installing Flow Meters
    7/11/2018

    Water and wastewater utilities rely on accurate flow measurement for important process controls. These may include recycle streams, chemical dosing systems, and other operational functions. In addition, regulators require utilities to measure certain flows, such as treatment plant influent and effluent and potable water pumping. Accurate flow measurement is also important for monitoring and reducing unaccounted-for water.

  5. The Challenge Of Flow Disturbances On Meter Accuracy
    7/10/2018

    Accurately measuring flow is critical for water utility operations. Also, regulatory agencies mandate flow monitoring and require annual calibration of meters. But even a meter in perfect condition and properly calibrated can read inaccurately. Flow disturbances are a common cause of accuracy and repeatability errors.

  6. Making The Most Of Data In A Digitalized World
    6/22/2018

    Water treatment plant (WTP) and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) operators are increasingly supporting better decision-making by leveraging digitalization capabilities available through instrumentation and plant management systems. Successful adoption of digitalization starts with identifying the right balance of tools (i.e., web-networked instrumentation) and systems (i.e., analytical data management software). Maximizing the value, however, is as much about exercising a mind-set of efficiency as it is about tracking raw numbers.

  7. The Smarter Water Manager
    6/14/2018

    Communities around the world are facing a growing storm. Complex challenges including water scarcity, changing demographics, extreme weather patterns, and aging or overly stressed infrastructure are colliding to threaten critical water, energy, transport, enterprise and health networks. The water industry is in the eye of the storm.

  8. Water Treatment Analytics: A Road Map To Greater Efficiency
    6/5/2018

    From the largest metropolitan water treatment plant (WTP) or wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) operations to the smallest rural systems, the goals are essentially the same — achieve regulatory compliance and the most efficient results at the lowest practical cost. The most feasible (i.e., affordable) control solutions vary by process, plant size, and budgetary limitations. Here are several high-level guidelines to achieving a common strategy that works across virtually all applications: good data, properly analyzed, yields good results.

  9. Hidroing d.o.o. Reduces Water Loss For Croatian Water Supply Network
    5/30/2018

    Varkom D.D. (Varkom) brings water and wastewater utility services to 175,000 people across seven townships and 20 municipalities in Varaždin County, Croatia. The organization wanted a feasibility study completed to help better manage its assets spanning the 1,650-kilometer supply network, which included 23 water tanks and 36 pressure stations.

  10. How To Apply And Maintain A Photometric/Colorimetric Analyzer
    5/21/2018

    Water resource recovery (WRR) plants must monitor ammonium and orthophosphate. Permitted levels for these nutrients in effluent discharge are becoming increasingly tight because state environmental agencies and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are requiring dischargers to reduce the amount of nutrients in their effluent.