Wastewater Measurement

  1. Comparing Benefits Of V-Cone® And Coriolis Meters
    1/28/2019

    Proper operation of water treatment processes depends on accurate flow measurements. Also, flow data is often required by regulatory agencies.

  2. Quantifying The Benefits Of High-Volume Meter Testing
    1/24/2019

    “I know that (blank) is good for me; I just haven’t gotten around to doing it yet!” Most of us can fill in that blank with any number of tasks — modifying diets, exercising, or monitoring commercial and industrial (C&I) water meter accuracy at our largest utility accounts. If that last item is still on your “to-do” list, here are several good reasons why you should do it and how to make it happen soon.

  3. Electromagnetic Meters And Ultrasonic Meters — A Comparison
    1/17/2019

    Water and wastewater professionals rely on accurate flow measurements for process operation and regulatory compliance. Selecting the best flow meter for each application is essential to obtaining accurate flow data.

  4. Gas Processing Data Analysis From Afar
    1/14/2019

    Unmanned well sites in remote locations present operational challenges. Data must not only be collected, but it also must be monitored to uncover any discrepancies, and ideally predict any problems before they occur. Advanced analytics software, coupled with a sophisticated data collection system, can address these issues, and also provide additional benefits.

  5. Securing Industrial Systems In A Digital World
    1/11/2019

    The development of Industrial Control Systems (ICS) over the past two decades has changed the face of many industries. Operation Technology (OT) — largely industrial equipment — has become increasingly connected, and the integration of Information Technology (IT) components allows such devices to leverage software that drives data collection and analysis, resulting in enhanced performance and ultimately "smarter" machines.

  6. 5 Questions To Ask Before Selecting A Process Data Analytics Solution
    1/7/2019

    The data generation and collection strategies at the center of manufacturing processes have evolved dramatically, especially in recent years. Process manufacturers now collect and store huge volumes of data throughout their operations, both on and off premise, across multiple geographic locations, in an increasing number of separate data silos. In this paper, we propose five questions we believe every process manufacturing buyer should ask when evaluating a data analytics solution.

  7. Leveraging Predictive Analytics: A Case Study
    1/6/2019

    Often the first notification of a spill comes from a member of the public, hours and sometimes days after the first spill. This can intensify public health and environmental impacts and the cost of clean-up efforts. Following a sewer spill at an environmentally significant site at Midway Point in August 2017, TasWater sought a way to reduce the likelihood and impact of spill events occurring in the future.

  8. Devon Energy Uses Real-Time Data And Advanced Analytics To Make Better Decisions
    1/4/2019

    Like many other energy companies, Devon Energy, a leading independent oil and natural gas exploration and production company in North America, generates huge volumes of data. The company’s SCADA system monitors 6.5 million data points from multiple sites, with more than 10,000 updates per second. 

  9. Optimize Process Unit Results With Advanced Analytics For Condition-Based Monitoring
    1/3/2019

    Businesses rely on process units meeting or exceeding their operational plans. To ensure that operational plans are achieved, it is important that equipment operates as designed (i.e., delivers the required performance) and continues to operate in an optimum manner (i.e., remains reliable, in a good condition). The most common causes of missing operational plan targets are equipment failure, which results in unplanned downtime, and low quality or yields from production processes.

  10. Industrial IoT-Enabled Remote Monitoring Improves OEM Service Performance
    1/3/2019

    The prime reason most industrial plants still have internal, on-site maintenance staffs is to reduce repair times and unplanned downtime, which negatively impact revenue, customer satisfaction, cost, and other key business metrics. In most plants today, contracting with the equipment manufacturer for maintenance usually results in unacceptably long periods of downtime for critical equipment while waiting for a technician to arrive – particularly with the typical two passes required for inspection and repair.