Labor Solutions & Insights for Utility Managers

  1. A Bill Of Relief For Small Wastewater Treatment Plants
    5/22/2017

    If passed, a new piece of bipartisan legislation would provide technical assistance to rural wastewater treatment systems that need help in complying with federal regulations.

  2. Big Project? Lead Even Bigger With 4 Steps To Project Success In 2018
    2/1/2018

    In the first months of the new year, many of us find ourselves facing a combination of ambitious agendas, competing priorities, and budget realities. In the U.S. water sector, there is a never-ending gamut of accountabilities involved in ensuring water quality, including addressing and preventing water shortages, innovating to fight contamination and treat wastewater, and upgrading vast infrastructure.

  3. Simulating A Cure For Brain Drain
    2/8/2016

    Much has been made of the gap in knowledge to come when the water industry’s aging workforce reaches retirement. With advances in simulation training software capable of getting new employees familiar with plant processes, it may be an analog fear in the digital world.

  4. Innovate, Collaborate, And Commit: 3 Keys To High Performance In The Water Sector
    10/11/2017

    In a recent Water Online editorial, Kevin Westerling shared a Q&A with Water Environment Federation (WEF) President Rick Warner. Central to the conversation were the topics of innovation, collaboration, and leadership within the context of the challenges faced by the U.S. water industry. Among these issues: rebuilding and replacing aging infrastructure, advancing clean water initiatives, and making progress with water reuse.

  5. Making Water Quality Matter Every Day
    4/19/2016

    Every day most of the developed world wakes up and turns on a tap to get water. Whether it’s for tea, coffee, or just a plain glass of water, most people can count on fresh, clean potable water just the way they like it.

  6. Something In The Water? A Journey To High Performance
    8/4/2016

    Every week, as General Manager for People and Culture at Yarra Valley Water in Melbourne, Australia, I’m asked for advice about how we transformed the culture of our publicly-owned water corporation. The requests come from near and far — peer utilities, businesses in other sectors, and government agencies. They’d like the recipe for what we’ve accomplished — the steps from A-Z. But it’s not as simple as that. It’s been a true journey with twists and turns that weren’t always pretty, and we gave life to it as we grew. In this article I’d like to share insights that might make this kind of transformation accessible to other organizations.

  7. WWEMA Window: Growing A Network Of Information Resources
    6/20/2018

    I had the pleasure of attending my 21st AWWA ACE recently in Las Vegas, NV. During this event, I had the opportunity to talk with many newcomers to the industry.  One theme they kept bringing up was the amount of technology that is available to the water and wastewater industries.  As someone who is now entering the ranks of the industry veterans, I feel obligated to share my insight on that singular observation: “Modern technology alone will not solve the problems of our current water and wastewater infrastructure.”

  8. Math Solutions: Wet Well Flow Rate Calculations
    8/6/2015

    Water Online’s “Math Solutions” series, presented by wastewater consultant and trainer Dan Theobald (“Wastewater Dan”), instructs operators on a variety of calculations necessary for plant operations and operator certification. Here Dan tackles wet well calculations, with a bonus calculation for determining flow in cubic feet.

  9. A Beginner’s Guide To On-Site Sodium Hypochlorite Generation
    8/21/2014

    Why buy, transport, and store chlorine when you can make your own? Here are nine questions to consider before adopting the practice.

  10. 5 Steps To Prepare The Next Generation Of Water Workers
    7/10/2018

    Much like investing in water infrastructure, the country often overlooks the pressing need to invest in a skilled workforce to manage these systems. Nearly 1.7 million “water workers”construct, operate, and maintain water systems found in every region, whether employed in utilities, engineering firms, or other industries. And many water workers are in short supply due to a wave of retirements and a lack of younger talent, even though they earn more competitive wages, tend to only need a high school diploma or less, and develop valuable skillsets over time.