Water Membranes White Papers and Case Studies

  1. Bubble Removal From Aqueous Streams Using 3M™ Liqui-Cel™ SP Series Membrane Contactors
    7/18/2017

    Many manufacturing processes, analytical measurements, and other industrial processes that involve aqueous solutions are adversely affected by bubbles in the fluid stream. 3M™ Liqui-Cel™ SP Series Membrane Contactors provide a very simple, cost effective solution to help eliminate bubbles from such processes.

  2. 3M™ Liqui-Cel™ Membrane Contactors Provide An Easy, Flexible Solution For Managing Dissolved Oxygen In Hard Cider
    7/11/2017

    Controlling dissolved oxygen (DO) levels during beverage production is vital for ensuring consistent product quality and shelf life. This is particularly true for canning, where high DO levels can cause breakdown of the can lining, corrosion and even leaking – which in turn can result in product waste and customer dissatisfaction. In some cases, can supplier warranties have exclusions for high DO levels.

  3. Using ‘TransMembraneChemiSorption’ (TMCS) For Ammonia Removal From Industrial Waste Waters
    7/4/2017

    Dissolved gases like NH3, H2S or NOx in waste water lead to contamination in the sewage system and high treatment costs for municipal waste water treatment plants. 

  4. Kirin Beer Uses 3M Liqui-Cel Membrane Contactors For CO2 and O2 Removal to Prevent Pipe Corrosion at Three of Their Japanese Breweries
    6/28/2017

    In the food and beverage industry, there is a growing awareness of environmental considerations wherever chemicals are used. In response, companies are trending towards alternative systems that operate with less chemical usage.

  5. Power Plant Uses 3M Liqui-Cel Membrane Contactors To Remove CO2 From Water
    6/21/2017

    A major power plant in Thailand is using 3M™ Liqui-Cel™ Membrane Contactors to remove carbon dioxide from a DI water system. The system is an expansion project and will be used to feed a high pressure boiler. Liqui-Cel membrane contactors are being used to lower the CO₂ inlet into an Ionpure Electrodeionization (EDI) system. Carbon dioxide adds an ionic load to the EDI system, which can reduce the performance of the system. Manufactures of the EDI equipment suggest lowering the inlet CO₂ to reduce the load on the equipment and improve the water quality.

  6. China Power Plant Reduces Capital Costs, Energy Use With New Integrated Membrane System
    6/15/2017

    As engineers come under increasing pressure to reduce maintenance and operating costs, inefficient combination double-pass reverse osmosis and electrodeionization (RO/EDI) water treatment systems have begun to lose popularity as a means of providing ultra-pure water. Integrated membrane systems (IMS), on the other hand, combine multiple membrane-based water treatment processes into a single system. In this case study, find out how a heat and power plant in Northeast China lowered capital costs and energy use by adopting an IMS to replace its conventional water treatment system.

  7. IMEC UPW System Utilizes 3M™ Liqui-Cel™ Membrane Contactors For Oxygen Removal
    5/4/2017

    IMEC (Interuniversity Micro- Electronics Center) in Belgium is Europe's largest independent research center. It focuses on microelectronics, nanotechnology, and enabling design methods and technologies for ICT (Integrated Circuit Technology) systems. IMEC's research runs 3 to 10 years ahead of industrial needs.

  8. Ozone Resolves Hydrogen Sulfide And Color Issues In Well Water
    4/27/2017

    A potable water plant in Eastern Angelina County, Texas,  serves over 2,000 rural customers.

  9. Evaluation And Optimization Of Clean-In-Place Using Ozone
    4/27/2017

    A chemical company which specializes in Clean-In-Place (CIP) systems, contacted Mazzei to discuss the use of ozone as an alternative to peracetic acid sanitation or heat sterilization at their customers’ plants.

  10. Basin Nozzle Manifold Contacting System Installation Remediates Taste And Odor Compounds, Meets Disinfection Goals
    4/27/2017

    A water quality audit revealed that two of the largest drinking water plants in the City of Montreal were out of compliance with Quebec’s latest water quality rules. Both drinking water facilities were located in heavily populated areas; consequently, plant modifications had to be accomplished within their existing infrastructure footprints.