Wastewater Features

  1. How To Provide Effective Disinfection With No Hazardous Chemicals
    10/19/2018

    Reliable and effective disinfection is a cornerstone of water and wastewater treatment, needed to protect public health. Most drinking water utilities are required to maintain a minimum disinfectant residual in the distribution system. This ensures adequate chemical was applied and remains in the system to kill pathogens. The most commonly used disinfectants — chlorine gas and bulk sodium hypochlorite — require operators to regularly handle these hazardous chemicals. Operators must be extensively trained in specialized procedures to ensure their safety and that of the community. 

  2. How Is California Affected By The Clean Water Act Mess?
    10/5/2018

    Just when we thought the jurisdictional and regulatory issues concerning the federal Clean Water Act and the resulting implications could not get more complicated, recent developments have put that possibility to rest.

  3. Following Florence, Lessons From Harvey In Recovery And Resilience
    9/20/2018

    With the impacts of Hurricane Florence continuing to unfold, coastal communities in the Southeast will soon be looking to other coastal areas, like Houston, as models for rebuilding resiliently. By doing so, they can speed their recovery and build back in smart ways — because that’s what resilience is all about.

  4. Sending Your Wet Weather Problem Back To The Cloud(s)
    9/17/2018

    Most of us don’t have to think about the vital infrastructure that supports our society.  Water is delivered to our homes and businesses 24/7, and wastewater is efficiently and cleanly whisked away.  The ability of our utilities to manage these services means we only take notice at times of inconvenience: water outages, sewer blockages, or stormwater overflows. 

  5. How Data And Nature Can Combine To Help Small Wastewater Treatment Plants Address Huge Hauling Costs
    9/13/2018

    It is no secret that the number of landfills has been steadily decreasing across the United States. As more and more cities adopt ‘zero waste to landfill’ sustainability goals, the number of landfills has shrunk from 6,326 in 1990 to 1,738 in 2015. Decreasing landfills has meant increased waste hauling costs for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) as sludge travels farther distances to reach landfills.

  6. Treating Emerging Contaminants With UV Advanced Oxidation
    9/4/2018

    As technology improves, contaminants can be measured in ever-smaller quantities. Pollutants formerly undetected are now becoming emerging contaminants of concern. Water utility managers must stay abreast of potential new regulations and plan for ways to address these contaminants.

  7. Smart Utility: Building A Foundation for Artificial Intelligence
    9/4/2018

    With data comes decision-making power, but how each utility wields that power will be different. The Smart Utility approach tailors digital capabilities to arrive at specific and optimal outcomes.

  8. Saving Infrastructure With Sensors In The Sewer
    9/4/2018

    With a little help from AI (artificial intelligence) and IoT (the Internet of Things), Kansas City gives a lesson on UEA-MEP — utilizing existing assets to the maximum extent possible.

  9. How Big Is Big Data Among Water Utilities?
    9/4/2018

    A survey of water utilities conducted by Black & Veatch reveals to what degree and how rapidly (or not) data analytics are being implemented in the real world.

  10. Water 4.0 And The Wastewater Cycle
    9/4/2018

    While it may be premature to claim wastewater management’s arrival in the digital age, we can herald the eventuality, chart the progress, and examine potential implications.