More Regulations and Legislation Features

  1. Big Steps In Plant Upgrade By Howard County Maryland Set The Pace For Restoring Chesapeake Bay Ecosystem
    3/14/2013

    A $92-million expansion completed earlier this year (2012) at the Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant (LPWRP) in Savage, MD, presents a model integration of bellwether aeration, disinfection and enhanced nutrient removal (ENR) systems added in tandem with other infrastructure upgrades, that have significantly improved the plant’s effluent and reduced harmful nutrients from reaching Chesapeake Bay.

  2. Howard County, Maryland Sets The Pace In Restoring Chesapeake Bay Ecosystem
    6/16/2014

    Howard County, Maryland, Bureau of Utilities recently completed the $92-million Addition No. 7 project at the Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant (LPWRP) to improve the quality of the plant’s effluent discharge and to reduce harmful nutrients reaching Chesapeake Bay. The project’s various increments took over five years to complete and incorporated innovative design solutions and state-of-the-art technologies for denitrification, aeration and disinfection. The project presents a model for Maryland’s 66 largest wastewater treatment plants and possibly procurement of municipal facilities elsewhere facing increasingly stringent regulatory changes.

  3. North Las Vegas Puts Advanced Wastewater Treatment To Work
    5/9/2014
    The North Las Vegas Water Reclamation Facility treats an average of 17 million gallons a day (MGD) of wastewater through an advanced nutrient removal process with subsequent membrane filtration. The utility’s process control enables treatment effluent exceeding typical environmental standards and allows discharge to Lake Meade, where it subsequently is withdrawn and fully treated by other facilities for drinking water distribution.
  4. The Many Faces Of Carbon — A Versatile Treatment Solution
    8/13/2014

    What concerns drinking water municipalities the most? Is it regulations, emerging contaminants, or a crisp, clear product? To a degree, it’s all of the above. Jim Knepper of Jacobi Carbons explains.

  5. A Sustainable Solution For Treating Contaminants
    11/13/2014

    There are a number of regulations in drinking water centered around emerging contaminants. Hexavalent chromium is one that you’ll see on the national marketplace.

  6. UV Examined (Audio)
    8/1/2013

    Adam Festger, Market Manager, Drinking Water and Environmental Contaminant Treatment for TrojanUV, highlights some of advances in UV technology over the last few years including UV groundwater treatment, UV chemical contamination treatment and UV lamp efficiency.

  7. Smith & Loveless Preaches Quality In Manufacturing
    12/15/2011

    Frank Rebori, president of Smith & Loveless, sat down with Water Online Radio for this live interview from the show floor at WEFTEC 2011 in Los Angeles. Rebori discussed the company's 65-year history, its current successes, and the main products it sells: wastewater pumping and treatment equipment, as well as headworks (grit removal) equipment.

  8. San Diego Plant Cuts THM Levels In Half
    8/3/2017

    The 34 MGD Otay Water Treatment Plant in San Diego, California serves a population of approximately 200,000. It is a conventional treatment plant that uses coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, filtration and disinfection. The plant receives raw water from two different sources — imported water from the Colorado River and runoff water from three local reservoirs.

  9. Treatment Of Cyanotoxins In Drinking Water With Activated Carbon
    9/24/2014

    Recently, cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins have become a high profile drinking water quality concern in both the United States and abroad. The combination of weather conditions, agricultural phosphate runoff, and other factors has produced water conditions that have favored the formation of cyanobacteria in surface water supplies.

  10. Take Charge Of Discharge With AccuFAS
    6/27/2016

    Changing environmental conditions and increased regulatory oversight have combined to make discharge one of the most pressing concerns for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) today. While many plants have found that they need to step up their treatment game to keep up, it can be a challenge to find improvements that are effective and efficient.