Latest Industrial Insights

  1. How Oil & Gas States Did (And Did Not) Protect Land And Water In 2018
    1/11/2019

    Keeping an eye on what happens with domestic oil and gas regulation is a bit like herding cats. We’ve seen encouraging progress on air quality issues related to oil and gas, but an equally critical front that’s seen major action is protection of our land and water resources.

  2. A New Way To Kill Legionella
    1/10/2019

    Advanced oxidation provides an all-in-one solution that supports the complete eradication of Legionella in a water system, while also preventing its regrowth.

  3. EPA-New Mexico Wastewater Report Is A Conversation Starter, Not The Final Word
    1/4/2019

    When it comes to answering questions about whether the oil and gas industry’s wastewater can be safely reused for other purposes, like food crops, livestock, or even drinking water, there are a number of other serious factors to be considered.

  4. The Next Turn For 'Waters of the United States'
    1/2/2019

    After the Supreme Court, in its 2006 Rapanos v. United States decision, admonished the U.S. EPA and Army Corps of Engineers to once and for all come up with an acceptable definition of “waters of the United States,” which is the linchpin for all regulation under the Clean Water Act, the agencies, nine years later, finalized regulations redefining that term in their 2015 Rule. 

  5. Design And Care Of Reverse Osmosis Systems, Part 1: Design
    12/20/2018

    Reverse osmosis (RO) systems offer power plant owners and operators a reliable and well-proven water treatment solution. However, designing and caring for an RO system requires a thorough understanding of a plant’s water supply and the technology’s capabilities. Part one of this series will review the importance of water samples and pilot studies as plant engineers begin to design an RO system to match their needs.

  6. New Research Shows That Exposure To Chemicals Like BPA Disrupts Microbial Communities In Zebrafish
    12/18/2018

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an industrial chemical that has been used to make certain plastics and resins since the 1960s. In recent years, science has shown that exposure to BPA and its alternatives can result in possible human health effects. Adverse effects on neurodevelopment, behavior, metabolism, and the immune and cardiovascular systems have been found in human and animal models. As a result, regulators and researchers are interested in learning more about bisphenol chemicals.

  7. How Farms Can Tend To The Energy-Water Nexus, Reduce Costs, And Help Their Communities
    11/28/2018

    Across the country, farmers face unrelenting pressure to conserve both water and energy. From California to Texas, recent droughts and declining groundwater levels require more pumping to provide irrigation water for crops. Pumping water takes energy, as do many other precision agriculture tasks involved in running a successful farm today. This symbiotic relationship between water and energy use — often called the energy-water nexus — is taking its toll on America’s agricultural industry.

  8. Capacitive Deionization Takes Off
    11/26/2018

    Capacitive deionization (CDI), sometimes called electrochemical demineralization, is referred to as Radial Deionization (RDI) by Atlantis Technologies, which has developed a proprietary form of the process. If you haven't heard of it by any name, or would like to know more about its considerable treatment capabilities, tune into this interview with Patrick Curran,

  9. Precise Level And Interface Measurement In Wastewater Tanks
    11/8/2018

    Guided wave radar technology provides accurate and reliable level and interface measurement in effluent treatment areas, ensuring regulatory compliance and reducing costs in wastewater applications.

  10. Onshore Crude Oil Decontamination Using A Water Security Test Bed
    11/6/2018

    Onshore crude oil production has increased in the United States over the past few years. Oil producers, specifically the North Dakota Pipeline Authority and the Bakken Shale field producers are transporting crude oil by rail and train to both the East and West Coast oil refineries. While rail tends to be one of the safer and more efficient ways of transporting crude oil, there is still a risk of a spill. Oil spills are threats to both ground and surface waters, which can ultimately impact drinking water.