From the Editor

  1. 3 Water/Wastewater Efficiency Trends To Watch In 2018

    2018 is sure to be marked with advancements that make water and wastewater treatment more efficient and sustainable. To keep up with the areas best poised for improvement this year, here is a look at three practices that are in need of change.

  2. Universities In Iowa, Ohio Receive Toxic Algae Research Grants

    With some federal help, researchers at Iowa State University (ISU) and Ohio State University (OSU) are looking to build up defenses against toxic algae growth in source waters.

  3. State Raises Concerns Over Flint’s Lack Of Water System Staff

    Officials in the state of Michigan have voiced concern over the City of Flint’s ability to manage its water system, more than two years since it startled struggling with lead contamination.

  4. The Top 3 Treatment Stories Of 2017 And What They Mean For 2018

    Last year was full of twists and turns for the drinking water and wastewater treatment industries. What can 2017’s biggest stories tell us about what’s to come this year?

  5. EPA Overstates Its Work On Superfund Cleanup

    Though the current U.S. EPA administration is boasting about its action to clean up the nation’s Superfund sites, it appears that it has not done as much as implied.

  6. New Research Improves Potential For Dairy Wastewater Resource Recovery

    In 2017, society made great strides in utilizing the natural resources found in wastewater. If this recent project is any indication, 2018 will see even more efforts to do so.

  7. Microbe-Filled Beads Could Be Biosolids Solution For Wastewater Plants

    A new chemical solution has emerged that might help wastewater treatment operations deal with biosolids.

  8. Why Microplastics Are Still A Macro Problem For Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Though some preliminary regulations have taken place to curb the presence of microplastics in the environment, more research is needed to determine what role wastewater treatment plants can and will play in solving the problem for good.

  9. Under Consent Order, Pittsburgh Looks To Speed Up Lead Line Replacement

    Withstanding a difficult 2017, the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority (PWSA) now has its sights set on improvements to its lead water lines in the near future.

  10. A New Standard For Lead Service Line Replacement

    As drinking water utilities around the country look to tackle outdated lead service lines, a new standard for replacement will help keep efforts consistent.