Drinking Water Treatment Insights

  1. EPA Researchers Partner With WaterStep To Deliver Clean Water During Emergencies
    9/11/2018

    Following a disaster like the back-to-back hurricanes that hit Texas, Florida, and Puerto Rico in 2017, water systems can become flooded and unable to provide safe drinking water to communities. EPA researchers recognized the need for portable water treatment systems that can quickly and cost-effectively provide safe drinking water to affected communities following a disaster. 

  2. Using Flow Meters To Reduce Non-Revenue Water
    9/10/2018

    Utility managers are continually challenged to run water systems in the most efficient manner. Reducing non-revenue water (NRW) is an important component for system efficiency. In many states, regulators are placing caps on NRW or requiring reductions in the amount of NRW. Accurate and well-planned flow measurement can be used to locate areas of water leakage and reduce NRW.

  3. Treating Emerging Contaminants With UV Advanced Oxidation
    9/4/2018

    As technology improves, contaminants can be measured in ever-smaller quantities. Pollutants formerly undetected are now becoming emerging contaminants of concern. Water utility managers must stay abreast of potential new regulations and plan for ways to address these contaminants.

  4. Improving RO Membrane Performance With Cross-Flow Microsand Technology
    9/4/2018

    As fresh water supplies dwindle, the use of sea water becomes more attractive. New technologies are making reverse osmosis (RO) a more effective and cost-efficient method for desalination. Utilizing an effective pretreatment system to improve the quality of the feed water traveling through the RO membranes will aid in improving the performance of your membrane system.

  5. Smart Utility: Building A Foundation for Artificial Intelligence
    9/4/2018

    With data comes decision-making power, but how each utility wields that power will be different. The Smart Utility approach tailors digital capabilities to arrive at specific and optimal outcomes.

  6. How Big Is Big Data Among Water Utilities?
    9/4/2018

    A survey of water utilities conducted by Black & Veatch reveals to what degree and how rapidly (or not) data analytics are being implemented in the real world.

  7. Reducing PFAS In Drinking Water With Treatment Technologies
    8/29/2018

    Per- and Polyfluorinated substances (PFAS) are a group of man-made chemicals that persist in the environment. These chemicals have been used for decades in consumer products to make them non-stick and water resistant. They are also found in firefighting foams and are applied in many industrial processes. 

  8. Tank Covers Improve Operations And Save Costs For Water Treatment Plants
    8/16/2018

    Water treatment professionals face many challenges while working to provide customers with safe drinking water. Disinfection is critical to protect public health, but harmful byproducts may form during the process. In addition, some disinfectants volatilize and lose effectiveness when exposed to sunlight. Keeping tanks covered may help to reduce these problems while providing additional benefits.

  9. Tapping Into The World’s Largest Water Reserves: Oceans And Seas
    8/16/2018

    As per many authentic references, about 97 percent of the water in the world belongs to oceans and seas, whereas 3 percent is freshwater available as glaciers, ice caps, and waterbodies. While we strive to manage available lakes, rivers, and other inland water resources to meet present and future public needs, why not look to these saline water reservoirs as potential alternatives for sustainability?

  10. My Most Personal Initiation To PFAS
    8/13/2018

    When I attended the U.S. EPA-hosted PFAS Summit held at the Horsham, PA high school auditorium on July 25, 2018, the education I received from state and municipal leaders focusing on the local problem was more than just a professional briefing. It was ominously personal, due to the fact that the Water Online editorial office where I work and drink water every day is served by a utility sitting smack-dab in the middle of one of the most concentrated PFAS hotspots in the U.S.