Drinking Water Filtration Case Studies and White Papers

  1. China Power Plant Reduces Capital Costs, Energy Use With New Integrated Membrane System
    6/15/2017

    As engineers come under increasing pressure to reduce maintenance and operating costs, inefficient combination double-pass reverse osmosis and electrodeionization (RO/EDI) water treatment systems have begun to lose popularity as a means of providing ultra-pure water. Integrated membrane systems (IMS), on the other hand, combine multiple membrane-based water treatment processes into a single system. In this case study, find out how a heat and power plant in Northeast China lowered capital costs and energy use by adopting an IMS to replace its conventional water treatment system.

  2. Manufacturing Plants Based On The Lego Principle
    5/2/2017

    Small batches and multiple products in the same plant — these are the market demands to which more and more manufacturers need to adjust. The answer is based on the "Lego principle."

  3. State-Of-Art Filters Triple Filter Run Times And Maximize Performance
    3/16/2017

    A plant manager in Colorado became frustrated by the consistently short filtration run-times and the large amount of water wasted by the four dual-cell bottom filters used to clean the region’s drinking water. Xylem’s Leopold Type XA underdrain with I.M.S 200 media retainer, new filter media (12” silica sand/18” anthracite), and wash troughs, emerged as the top choice.

  4. Dual Membrane Plant System Audit
    2/6/2017

    How do you know if you are in control of microorganisms in your dual membrane plant? See how one water treatment plant performed a system audit using ATP technology to confirm microbiological treatment efficacy through each stage of the process.

  5. Rapidly Pinpoint Biological Hotspots In Your Distribution System
    12/14/2016

    After reports of Naegleria fowleri amoeba being found in some Louisiana municipalities’ drinking water systems, regulators mandated that free chlorine residual be maintained at a minimum of 0.5 mg/L throughout distribution networks in the state. In September 2014, Thornton, Musso & Bellemin Inc. (Zachary, LA) conducted an extensive sanitary survey in a small municipality to establish baseline numbers and troubleshoot hotspots.

  6. Granular Activated Carbon Removes PFOA From Drinking Water
    12/7/2016

    In the fall of 2015, a small village on the border of Vermont in New York State, tested positive for Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs), specifically Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA), in the municipal drinking water. The influent levels of PFOA in the water were above 600 ng/L, and thus considered harmful to village residents. Realizing that PFOA was on the U.S. EPA Contaminant Candidate List, the Village solicited the services of engineering firm CT Male Associates to investigate treatment options and provide a treatment system.

  7. Better Water For Less Than Half The Cost
    11/4/2016

    When Anderson Regional Joint Water System (ARJWS) in South Carolina began experiencing a cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) bloom that was beyond its treatment plant’s ability to handle, they turned to the experts at Clemson University and an innovative, targeted, and cost-effective method of treatment to meet its customers’ expectations for taste and odor. Read the full case study to learn more.

  8. Global Pharmaceutical Company EnviQ Membrane Bioreactor (MBR)
    11/4/2016

    The Serum Institute is a global pharmaceutical company that is one of the world’s largest producers of vaccines. The Institute was planning an expansion to their manufacturing plant in Pune, India, that resulted in an additional water requirement for the plant’s needs.

  9. Mobile Membrane Systems Provide Emergency Response
    9/21/2016

    When emergencies inevitably arise, municipal operators need to be prepared to respond immediately to restore services in order to provide safe, reliable water to their customers. Take for example the City of Cisco, Texas.

  10. Oregon Utilizes Encore 700 Metering Pumps To Ensure Reliability And Accuracy
    8/15/2016

    The City of Salem uses a slow sand filtration water treatment process, which uses naturally occurring biological activity to clean drinking water. The water treatment facility treats an average of 30 MGD throughout most of the year, with a peak of 50 MGD in the summer.