Drinking Water Case Studies and White Papers

  1. Sensing The Future: Water Technology’s 'Holy Grail'
    2/24/2014

    Real-time contaminant detection, featuring a network of sensors throughout the distribution network, is poised to revolutionize the water industry.

  2. BNR + MBR Equals Success At Water Reclamation Facility
    4/20/2015

    Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) is allowing many wastewater treatment plants to achieve extremely high effluent quality. Still, for some applications even the most advanced BNR processes can’t address concerns with trace organics, pharmaceuticals, and other endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs).

  3. Chlorine vs. Chloramine: A Tale Of Two Chemistries
    4/17/2018

    In drinking water treatment’s ongoing battle between disinfection and disinfection byproducts (DBPs), most water utility customers are oblivious to the process. One thing they do notice, however, is when their water smells or tastes bad. Here are some insights that can help water treatment plant (WTP) operators deal with their internal concerns about DBPs and residual chlorine or ammonia levels, as well as their external concerns about customer perceptions of water quality.

  4. Two-Way Fixed Network Helps Texas Community Become ‘City Of The Future’
    4/11/2014

    In January 2014, the city of Meadows Place, Texas, became the first city in Fort Bend County to fully convert to an Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) fixed-network system. At the same time, the city also implemented a complete meter change-out for its 1,600 customers. Both projects represent large initiatives for the self-proclaimed “little city” with a population of 4,600 citizens.

  5. Reducing Effluent Waste While Using Less Energy With CCD
    7/15/2014

    A pesticide manufacturing plant in Gujarat, India produces up to 6,000 metric tons per year of various pesticides for agricultural use.

  6. City Of Dallas Captures An Additional 600,000 Gallons Of Billable Water In Four Months
    7/19/2018

    After analyzing annual water loss audits for the city of Dallas, GA, the team discovered significant issues around non-revenue water. In 2014, real and apparent water loss accounted for 31.3 million gallons — nearly 20 percent of the city’s total water supplied for the year — which meant lost revenue for the city.

  7. Myth Vs Truth: “If My Disinfectant Residual Is Always High Enough, I Don’t Have To Worry About Microbes"
    5/26/2017

    Monitoring of disinfectant residuals ensures that sufficient protection is maintained at all points in the distribution system. The absence of a disinfectant residual means that suppression of microbiological growth is much more difficult and the rate of regrowth can be significantly accelerated. But does maintaining an adequate disinfectant residual provide enough protection?

  8. EBMUD Successfully Manages Chloramine Residual In 10-Million-Gallon Reservoir With Chloramine Management System
    5/23/2016

    Located on the eastern side of the San Francisco Bay, the East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) treats and distributes water to over 1.3 million customers in Alameda and Contra Costa counties. As one of the largest utility districts in California, EBMUD is a leader in the water industry’s water quality, conservation, and sustainability efforts.

  9. Dissolved Air Flotation Pretreatment Washes Away Waco’s Foul T&O Problem
    4/18/2013

    During the hot and dusty summers just a few years ago, many thirsty residents of Waco, TX, were reluctant to slake their thirst with the city’s water.

  10. Water Acquisition Challenges For Industrial Plants
    11/16/2018

    Water is becoming more complex for industry. Its cost as a component of production is on the rise, and greater regulatory scrutiny continues to expand post-process wastewater treatment. Against a backdrop of growing water scarcity, industrial leaders are focusing more time and energy into leveraging water acquisition and usage to their competitive advantage. The days when access to water was taken for granted are over. In fact, by 2030 global water demand is projected to exceed available water by 40 percent.