Drinking Water Case Studies and White Papers

  1. 4 Tips For Building Meter-Related Revenue
    4/20/2010
    The water meter industry operates on revenue and the modern utility is both a business and a public service. This article deals with the business and revenue side of the water industry. I don’t question the ability of the modern water utility to produce safe, high-quality water. However, I am concerned about the service side, since fairness to the end users of our product and fairness to the utilities who produce this very high-quality product is important and closely related to the revenue issues. It is our job to collect the revenue to which we are entitled by the application of fair business practices and the use of accurate and cost-saving measurement devices. I will talk about building revenue by avoiding revenue loss. By Floyd S. Salser, Jr., CEO, MARS Company
  2. Ecomuseum Zoo: High Efficiency Filtration Reduces Turbidity & Maintenance Costs
    9/12/2017

    ​The Ecomuseum Zoo is home to the most impressive ambassadors of Quebec’s wildlife. All residents of the Ecomuseum Zoo are there for a special reason: orphaned, injured or born under professional human care, each of them could not return to the wild. Hence, they have found a forever home at the zoo.

  3. Case Study: Improving RO Performance
    7/14/2010
    The client's reverse osmosis system utilized coagulants, antiscalants and cleaners to produce high quality water. With the current chemicals, the reverse osmosis system was cleaned every 90 days due to scaling or deposits.
  4. Echologics’ Acoustic Leak Detection System Non-Invasively Pinpoints Force Main Leaks For Large Industrial Company
    9/16/2011

    A large, U.S.-based Fortune 500 industrial company was experiencing multiple leaks on a 1500ft span of six inch steel force sewer main that conveyed sanitary wastewater from one of its plants to a municipally-owned collection system.

  5. Cyanide Analysis Of Wastewater Samples From FCC And Hydrocracking Operations
    6/21/2013

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is a major unit operation in refineries around the world. FCC is used to convert lowvalue, high molecular weight feedstocks such as shale oil, tar sands oil, and coker gas oils into lighter, high-value products by “cracking” C-C bonds.

  6. Case Study: Water Supplier Ensures DBP Compliance With UV254 Organic Monitoring
    3/18/2009
    Mohawk Valley Water Authority (MVWA) is a progressive supplier of potable water. With source water from the Adirondack Mountains, MVWA works to improve on nature and provide superior water quality, always striving to meet or exceed drinking water standards. Like many other surface water sources, MVWA’s water supply is rich with natural organic matter (NOM). Unfortunately, growing research has demonstrated that NOM in water when combined with chlorine leads to the formation of potentially harmful disinfection by-products.
  7. Smart Meters Teach Consumers About Water Usage
    5/23/2011
    Homeowners often go to great lengths to conserve electricity or use less gas or oil to heat their homes. By Joel Hoiland, CEO, Utilimetrics
  8. Automation Of Wastewater Treatment Plants For Cape Whale Coast
    12/7/2016

    Hermanus on South Africa’s Cape Whale Coast is a tourist hotspot. Just two hours outside of Cape Town, the number of holiday complexes being built along this idyllic coast is increasing. The problem is that the city is in a water scarce area. The answer lies in an upgrade of the Preekstoel water treatment plant.

  9. Municipal Wastewater Provides A Solution For A Major Chemical Processing Plant
    7/6/2017

    Water scarcity is requiring large industrial plants to investigate conservation options, including reuse of municipal wastewater effluent, in order to grow sustainably while meeting increased demands for fresh water make-up.

  10. Using Advanced Metering Infrastructure To Control Water Loss
    6/12/2015

    Leakage is one of the primary concerns for water utilities worldwide, yet North American investment in water loss has, historically, not addressed the problem with sufficient urgency or expertise.