Asset Management Solutions & Insights for Utility Managers

  1. Lifecycle Management — Enhancing The ROI Of Control System Investments
    10/16/2018

    In water plant operations, there’s no such thing as simply maintaining the status quo. Any utility that is not moving forward is falling behind. Whether a water treatment or wastewater treatment plant (WTP/WWTP) chooses to rely on in-house resources or outside specialists, here are some lifecycle management approaches they can use to upgrade control capabilities without compromising performance or return on investment. 

  2. Prioritizing Alarm Responses For Better Workforce Management
    10/15/2018

    While the laws of physics and chemistry have not changed, the ways that water and wastewater treatment plants (WTPs/WWTPs) are being forced to deal with them certainly have — e.g., disinfection byproducts (DBPs), tighter turbidity standards, harmful algal blooms, and PFAS challenges. Even when plant throughput stays the same, the demands on plant personnel continue to increase. Here’s how evolving toward better workforce management processes can help. 

  3. Coping With Mixed-Source Water Quality And Corrosion Challenges
    10/12/2018

    When it becomes necessary to expand or blend water supply sources, variety is not necessarily the spice of life. Whether new water sources are surface water or groundwater, fresh, brackish, seawater, or water recovered from aquifer storage, they can ultimately impact water treatment plant (WTP) operations and finished water quality — including compliance with the U.S. EPA Lead and Copper Rule.

  4. Analytical Software Predicts Sewer System Blockages
    10/10/2018

    Using historical data and Seeq analytical software, Nukon calculates when sewer blockages will occur up to 13 hours before occurrence, preventing spills.

  5. Keys To Mastering Pump System Maintenance
    9/11/2018

    It has long been established that predictive maintenance of existing equipment will reduce operating costs and help ensure safe operation.

  6. Design-Build: Cyclical Trend Or Step Change?
    9/10/2018

    Over the past two decades, the trend from traditional design-bid-build (DBB) construction project-delivery practices to design-build (DB) practices has grown. Is that merely a cyclical trend or a step change that is destined to be a fixture for a long time to come?

  7. If A Pipe Leaks In A Forest, Does It Make A Sound?
    (Part II)
    9/6/2018

    If A Pipe Leaks In A Forest, Does It Make A Sound? (Part I) addressed condition assessment and leak detection from the perspective of surprises that can arise when “hidden” problems are revealed by acoustic technology. This article introduces several more eye-opening experiences with permanent and mobile acoustic leak detection equipment, plus examples of just how expensive undetected leaks can become when they turn into full-blown water main breaks.

  8. Improving The Quality Of Tertiary Effluent For Indirect Potable Reuse With Geographic Constraints
    9/5/2018

    The Mazzei Sidestream Venturi Injection – Pipeline Flash Reactor System provides a feasible alternative for dissolution of ozone at the Clark County Water Reclamation District (CCWRD) in Las Vegas, because it allowed for flexibility in basin design to meet geographic site constraints.

  9. Best Technology Available For Reliable Design Of Water Treatment Plant Hydraulics
    9/4/2018

    Treatment plant design comes in many shapes and sizes — and even dimensions. Determining the best option comes from understanding, and perhaps combining, the available options.

  10. If A Pipe Leaks In A Forest, Does It Make A Sound? (Part I)
    8/30/2018

    Beyond the existential philosophy implications, the consequences of a pipeline leaking in a forest when no one is around highlight the desirability of leak detection systems in water distribution utilities as a whole. As the following experiences show, leak detection can have its entertaining side. On the other side of the coin, however, the consequences of not monitoring leaks can also trigger a tsunami of costs far beyond the expense of pipeline repair alone.