Asset Management Solutions & Insights for Utility Managers

  1. Keys To Mastering Pump System Maintenance
    9/11/2018

    It has long been established that predictive maintenance of existing equipment will reduce operating costs and help ensure safe operation.

  2. Design-Build: Cyclical Trend Or Step Change?
    9/10/2018

    Over the past two decades, the trend from traditional design-bid-build (DBB) construction project-delivery practices to design-build (DB) practices has grown. Is that merely a cyclical trend or a step change that is destined to be a fixture for a long time to come?

  3. If A Pipe Leaks In A Forest, Does It Make A Sound?
    (Part II)
    9/6/2018

    If A Pipe Leaks In A Forest, Does It Make A Sound? (Part I) addressed condition assessment and leak detection from the perspective of surprises that can arise when “hidden” problems are revealed by acoustic technology. This article introduces several more eye-opening experiences with permanent and mobile acoustic leak detection equipment, plus examples of just how expensive undetected leaks can become when they turn into full-blown water main breaks.

  4. Improving The Quality Of Tertiary Effluent For Indirect Potable Reuse With Geographic Constraints
    9/5/2018

    The Mazzei Sidestream Venturi Injection – Pipeline Flash Reactor System provides a feasible alternative for dissolution of ozone at the Clark County Water Reclamation District (CCWRD) in Las Vegas, because it allowed for flexibility in basin design to meet geographic site constraints.

  5. Best Technology Available For Reliable Design Of Water Treatment Plant Hydraulics
    9/4/2018

    Treatment plant design comes in many shapes and sizes — and even dimensions. Determining the best option comes from understanding, and perhaps combining, the available options.

  6. If A Pipe Leaks In A Forest, Does It Make A Sound? (Part I)
    8/30/2018

    Beyond the existential philosophy implications, the consequences of a pipeline leaking in a forest when no one is around highlight the desirability of leak detection systems in water distribution utilities as a whole. As the following experiences show, leak detection can have its entertaining side. On the other side of the coin, however, the consequences of not monitoring leaks can also trigger a tsunami of costs far beyond the expense of pipeline repair alone.

  7. Wastewater Treatment: The Art Of Technology Selection
    8/23/2018

    Be it municipal or industrial, clients are always choosy and sensitive about the type of technologies they select for wastewater processing facilities. When it comes to physical, chemical, or biological treatments, plant operators and supervisors look for the best available, most cost-effective, and most user-friendly alternative. As such, technology selection is an art of choosing, arranging, and weaving different components of the treatment plant to provide it a unique identity. It’s the basic building block that bestows a facility its heart and soul.

  8. Revealing The Complicated Nature Of Tap Water Lead Contamination: A Madison, Wisconsin, Case Study
    8/2/2018

    In 1992, the City of Madison, Wisconsin, found concentrations of lead in their drinking water exceeding the 90th percentile action level of 0.015 mg/L set by EPA. Lead (Pb) is a naturally-occurring metal that was commonly used in household plumbing materials, such as lead service lines and leaded solder joints, before limits were set on its use in 1986.

  9. Jumpstart Smart Infrastructure By Adding Sensors To AMI
    8/1/2018

    Smart water networks today do more than read meters. They also collect data from sensors on distribution networks to help reduce non-revenue water losses, monitor and control pressures in water mains, and prevent unwanted sewage discharge. These new smart infrastructure solutions help water utilities expand the definition of smart water — going beyond applications aimed at improving billing accuracy and efficiency.

  10. (Ultra)Sound Opportunities For Aging Metering Infrastructure
    7/30/2018

    Most people accept that major purchases in life — e.g., housing, automobiles, appliances — come with cyclical budgeting impacts that require amortizing costs over the long term, through savings or borrowing. Why should anyone expect the national water infrastructure to be any different?