PFAS RESOURCES

PFAS SOLUTIONS

  • PFAS HPLC Column
    8/17/2021

    The new Ascentis® Express PFAS HPLC column, with its Fused-Core technology and a particle size of 2.7 μm, delivers fast and high-resolution separations with excellent selectivity, peak shape, and necessary retention to perform in EPA methods 537.1, 533 and 8327.

  • PFAS Reference Materials
    8/17/2021

    Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are man-made chemicals that have been used in industry and consumer products worldwide since the 1950s.
    PFAS can be found in:

  • ALTRA PFAS Solution
    1/14/2021

    Reliable PFAS extraction in water at a fraction of the cost and risk of solutions that rely primarily on adsorption media (activated carbon or ion exchange resins).

  • Activated Carbon For PFAS Treatment: Why Base Material Matters
    11/4/2019

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) is an effective and proven technology for the removal of PFAS and many other harmful organic compounds. But, not all products are the same and using the right GAC can make the difference between success and failure.

  • Carbon Systems
    10/15/2018

    Loprest designs and manufactures granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment systems for taste and odor applications, chlorine removal, PFC’s, 1 2 3 TCP, PCE/TCE, 1 4 dioxane, and many other contaminants. Loprest has a long, successful history in the selection and application of the proper carbon media for the application.

PFAS MULTIMEDIA

Sanitaire has an array of new digital solutions that focus on asset management as well as energy/process optimization. Please join us as we will discuss these solutions in detail and outline how these products can improve CAPEX budgeting plans and improve preventative maintenance through diffuser health monitoring. In addition, we will expand on how Sanitaire’s new offerings can save on OPEX with specialized energy saving software that optimize the aeration process. 

ABOUT PFAS

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a group of man-made chemicals that have sometimes been called “forever chemicals” for their persistent nature in the environment, difficulty to remove through treatment, and bioaccumulation in humans and animals. Two types of PFAS — perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) — have been identified as toxic by the U.S. EPA, while many more of the nearly 5,000 PFAS formulas are either suspected contaminants or have yet to be studied thoroughly. Originally developed for non-stick coatings, stain-repellant fabric treatments, and firefighting foams, PFAS are especially prevalent near former areas of high use — such as manufacturing facilities, airports, military bases, or the sites of large fires — yet widely problematic.

In February 2020, the EPA issued preliminary determinations to regulate PFOA and PFOS under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and establish the first national PFAS monitoring and treatment requirements for drinking water utilities (see EPA’s PFAS Action Plan). Numerous U.S. states, however, have already developed rules and guidance for PFAS.

This solution center addresses the topics and questions most important to drinking water professionals as the PFAS issue evolves — How does PFAS get into drinking water? How do utilities monitor for PFAS? What treatment technologies remove PFAS? What are the regulatory limits for PFAS? — with answers provided through breaking news stories, editorial insight, and technical discussions.