WIP Editorial

  1. Critically Needed Funding For Water Projects Is Ever So Near
    10/17/2018

    An infusion of $6 billion in federal funding for critical water infrastructure projects appears to be on the way to some very happy state and local officials. What a great gift!

  2. The Data Influx: Transforming Data Overload Into Business Insights
    10/4/2018

    “We have too much data” is the refrain we continually hear from water utilities. It’s no surprise that managing data from multiple sources and turning it into business insights presents a daunting challenge; however, data influx does not have to be a burden. When managed well, there’s no such thing as too much data, especially if your business is implementing a big data strategy — a topic that has implications and reach beyond the scope of this paper.

  3. How Data And Nature Can Combine To Help Small Wastewater Treatment Plants Address Huge Hauling Costs
    9/13/2018

    It is no secret that the number of landfills has been steadily decreasing across the United States. As more and more cities adopt ‘zero waste to landfill’ sustainability goals, the number of landfills has shrunk from 6,326 in 1990 to 1,738 in 2015. Decreasing landfills has meant increased waste hauling costs for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) as sludge travels farther distances to reach landfills.

  4. Government Leaders Are Beginning To Turn To Collaborative Joint Ventures For Water Projects
    9/12/2018

    Water utilities in the U.S. were once operated almost completely by private companies. That began to change when Boston, New York, Los Angeles, and other large cities expanded in the late 19th century.  Water utilities failed to manage the increased demand and government leaders stepped up to assume responsibility for adequate water resources. That’s been the case for decades, but now water problems are critical again.

  5. Harnessing Available Resources For Utility Energy Independence
    9/4/2018

    Water utilities in search of energy- and cost-saving opportunities can look to the sky — or to Sayreville, NJ — for inspiration.

  6. Water 4.0 And The Wastewater Cycle
    9/4/2018

    While it may be premature to claim wastewater management’s arrival in the digital age, we can herald the eventuality, chart the progress, and examine potential implications.

  7. The True Meaning Of 'Value Of Water' Awareness
    9/4/2018

    Observations from a conversation with Water Environment Federation (WEF) President Jenny Hartfelder

  8. Wastewater Treatment: The Art Of Technology Selection
    8/23/2018

    Be it municipal or industrial, clients are always choosy and sensitive about the type of technologies they select for wastewater processing facilities. When it comes to physical, chemical, or biological treatments, plant operators and supervisors look for the best available, most cost-effective, and most user-friendly alternative. As such, technology selection is an art of choosing, arranging, and weaving different components of the treatment plant to provide it a unique identity. It’s the basic building block that bestows a facility its heart and soul.

  9. Tapping Into The World’s Largest Water Reserves: Oceans And Seas
    8/16/2018

    As per many authentic references, about 97 percent of the water in the world belongs to oceans and seas, whereas 3 percent is freshwater available as glaciers, ice caps, and waterbodies. While we strive to manage available lakes, rivers, and other inland water resources to meet present and future public needs, why not look to these saline water reservoirs as potential alternatives for sustainability?

  10. Is Stormwater The Industry’s Red-Headed Stepchild?
    8/14/2018

    The National Municipal Stormwater Alliance recently released the 2018 State of Stormwater Report on municipal separate storm sewer system (MS4) permits under the NPDES permitting program — the first-ever in a series that will publish annually. The Alliance also explained the somewhat distressing reason why the report is necessary: Stormwater is being largely ignored.