Water Reuse

  1. Membrane Aerated Biofilm Reactor Technology Validated For Title 22 Compliance
    2/13/2019

    Title 22 of California’s Water Recycling Criteria is among the strictest water treatment standards for water recycling and reuse in the United States. Fluence’s MABR demonstration plant was installed at the Codiga Resource Recovery Center (CR2C) in Stanford, California, in January 2018 for the purpose of third-party evaluation. The testing parameters included criteria to evaluate reliable enhanced nutrient removal in the form of Total Nitrogen, which is increasingly important across the United States and difficult and costly to achieve through conventional wastewater treatment.

  2. Innovative Project In Virginia Changes Lens On Wastewater
    10/16/2018

    In September of 2016, Ted Henifin took the first sip of water purified at a pilot treatment plant developed by HRSD (Hampton Roads Sanitation District). Now, the innovative water treatment program known as SWIFT — Sustainable Water Initiative for Tomorrow — is changing the lens through which communities and government officials view wastewater, drinking water, aquifer replenishment, and even fighting sea level rise.

  3. Improving The Quality Of Tertiary Effluent For Indirect Potable Reuse With Geographic Constraints
    9/5/2018

    The Mazzei Sidestream Venturi Injection – Pipeline Flash Reactor System provides a feasible alternative for dissolution of ozone at the Clark County Water Reclamation District (CCWRD) in Las Vegas, because it allowed for flexibility in basin design to meet geographic site constraints.

  4. Crafting H2O — The Science And Art Of Beer Making
    9/4/2018

    Cincinnati-based MadTree Brewing Company is serious about how they make their beer. Their scientific approach means that they also pay close attention to the water they use, a message they’re more than happy to share.

  5. Aerobic Treatment Of Wastewater For Fish Flour And Fish Oil Company Reuse
    6/29/2018

    A fish flour and fish oil processing company produces 100 tons of flour a day from fish waste resulting from the broth concentration plant and from drying of flour, washing water, boiler blowdown and cooling towers. The company needed to treat its wastewater and to reduce its water supply costs.

  6. California Prepares For A Drought-Prone Future Under Stringent Title 22 Water Reuse Standards
    6/28/2018

    Fluence’s first MABR plant in mainland U.S. gives California new medium- and small-scale treatment options that comply with the state’s stringent standards for water reuse

  7. Australian Cities Adopt Wastewater Reuse
    6/27/2018

    Potable reuse of wastewater has gone by many different names, some of them unflattering, like “toilet to tap.” Despite the clear benefits of water reuse, this so-called “ick factor” has slowed the adoption of technology that can transform wastewater into drinking water.

  8. Water Quality Testing: Solutions From Catchment To Waste
    3/22/2018

    Globally, over 80% of the wastewater generated by society flows back into the environment without being treated or reused. Clean water is an essential part of daily life, from catchment all the way through to wastewater treatment, therefore analysis throughout the whole cycle is crucial. Whether in lakes, pipes, or bottles, we can accompany you with our range of instruments, test kits and applications for your water and wastewater needs.

  9. Southern California Water District Reduces Polymer Usage 30% With Polyblend® Polymer Activation System
    2/28/2018

    Santa Margarita Water District (SMWD), located in southern California’s Orange County, between Los Angeles and San Diego, provides drinking water and wastewater services to over 165,000 residents and businesses. SMWD approached UGSI Solutions about a Polyblend® Polymer Activation System trial at their 3 A Water Reclamation Plant.

  10. What Is The Connection Between Reclaimed Water, Agriculture, And Filtration?
    1/29/2018

    The case for using reclaimed water is strong. Water has become an increasingly valuable (and often rare) resource, and every drop counts. As potable water sources become harder to find and access, people are moving to alternative sources such as non-potable fresh water, brackish sources, or reclaiming treated effluent rather than disposing of it.