Wastewater Contaminant Removal White Papers & Case Studies

  1. Systems Work In Series To Increase Filter Run Times, Reduce Water Use, And Improve Finished Water Quality
    3/25/2015

    The city of Florence, Colorado Water Treatment Plant (WTP), located 75 miles south of Denver, uses blended surface water taken from the city’s southernmost water reservoir.

  2. Improved Pump And Seal Reliability When And Where It Really Counts
    3/25/2015

    The City of Chester, IL was getting only about 6 months life out of the mechanical seals in their former non-clog lift station pumps. While replacing seals twice per year was difficult and expensive, the more serious problem occurred when the seals failed with the Mississippi River at flood stage and with the sealed lift station underwater.

  3. Clari-DAF Pretreatment System Reduces Chemical Consumption, Doubles Treatment Capacity
    3/25/2015

    Together, two water treatment plants in Boulder, CO, have the capacity to treat 55 million gallons per day (MGD). When severe drought conditions restricted the source water supply of the Betasso WTP, the city decided to expand the capacity of the Boulder Reservoir Water Treatment Plant (WTP).

  4. Dissolved Air Flotation Technology Nearly Doubles Treatment Capacity
    3/21/2015

    Faced with a tight capital budget, a city in British Columbia required a new design for a water treatment plant capable of a maximum daily water production of 21 MPG during peak demand periods, with an ultimate demand of 29 MGD.

  5. How To Get A One-Year Payback On Retrofit Chopper Pumps For Your Packaged Lift Station
    3/16/2015

    The Independence Hill Conservancy District's Taney Lift Station was having continuous problems with wipes, swiffers, and plastics deposited in the incoming lines, which then broke loose in storms and overwhelmed the old non-clog pumps.

  6. Treatment Plant Utilizes UV Disinfection To Exceed Environmental Regulations
    3/13/2015

    The city of Carmel, IN, located north of Indianapolis, owns and operates a WWTP that treats sanitary waste from three Utilities.

  7. Hydro-Guard® Improves Water Quality And Saves Man-Hours For Central Texas Vacation Community
    3/10/2015

    The user population of a Central Texas resort system does not reach its peak until summer and the resultant levels of peak and low usage vary widely. This fluctuation impacts levels of disinfectant residual and, consequently, water quality — especially at the end of the line. Manual flushing of the utility's hydrants to maintain water quality has resulted in excessive time and labor as workers must access the outlying areas.

  8. FGD Purge Treatment In Coal-Fired Power Generation
    3/6/2015

    Stricter environmental policies and regulations worldwide are changing how industry approaches all aspects of business. Likewise, EU (European Union) environmental policies governing air, soil, and water quality have become progressively stringent.

    These policy changes affect the power industry’s balance of meeting growing European energy demands with compliance to environmental standards. In order to conform with EU standards specific for flue gas, a coalfired generation plant (at the time owned by Endesa, Italia, S.p.A.) in Monfalcone, Italy, undertook the measure of installing a state-of-the-art FGD (flue gas desulfurization) system at their facility. This system would remove SO2 (sulfur dioxide) from the emissions for the 336 MW coal-fired power station.

  9. Design-Build Using Actiflo Technology
    3/6/2015

    A state-of-the-art 695-MW power generation facility was recently installed in the Northeastern U.S. to serve the country’s highest demand market. Its innovative power generation technologies, emissions control systems and process efficiencies make it one of the cleanest, most efficient and technologically advanced supercritical pulverized coal (SPC) power plants in the U.S.

  10. Coal Yard Runoff Compliance Using Actiflo® Technology
    3/6/2015

    Storm water runoff from a 37-acre coal storage yard utilized as part of daily operations at an industrial site in Southwestern Pennsylvania posed a problem when the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) updated the facility’s NPDES permit.