Regulations and Legislation Features, Insights, & Analysis

  1. Monochloramine Monitoring – Reliable Analysis, Safer Drinking Water
    6/30/2015

    The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), enacted in 1974, is the main federal law that ensures the quality of Americans' drinking water. Under SDWA, EPA sets standards for drinking water quality and oversees the states, localities, and water suppliers who implement those standards. The law was amended in 1986 & 1996 requiring many actions to protect drinking water and its sources.

  2. Big Steps In Plant Upgrade By Howard County Maryland Set The Pace For Restoring Chesapeake Bay Ecosystem
    3/14/2013

    A $92-million expansion completed earlier this year (2012) at the Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant (LPWRP) in Savage, MD, presents a model integration of bellwether aeration, disinfection and enhanced nutrient removal (ENR) systems added in tandem with other infrastructure upgrades, that have significantly improved the plant’s effluent and reduced harmful nutrients from reaching Chesapeake Bay.

  3. Safe Drinking Water With UV Disinfection (Case Study)
    11/13/2011

    The source water in Cudahy, a city just south of Milwaukee, is susceptible to contamination and significantly impacted by agricultural and urban runoff. After a Cryptosporidium outbreak in the early 1990s, improved water quality was vital. A UV solution proved to be the best fit for protection against the contaminant within a restrictive space.

  4. Groundwater Replenishment System - Orange County, California (Case Study)
    6/15/2009

    The full-scale advanced treatment system takes filtered secondary effluent from the neighboring OCSD treatment plant and converts it to water that exceeds all drinking water quality standards. The 70 million gallon per day (MGD) system consists of microfiltration (MF), reverse osmosis (RO), and the TrojanUVPhox™ UV-oxidation/disinfection system.

  5. With The Prospect Of Lighter Restrictions, Wastewater Upgrades Could Be In Vain
    4/19/2017

    With the Trump administration likely to loosen wastewater treatment regulations, utilities face a conundrum.

  6. Importance Of Flare Gas Measurement Grows To Meet Environmental Regulations
    12/1/2017

    In the oil and gas industry, regulations and requirements to measure, monitor and report flared gases continue to expand and extend. The U.S. EPA continues to focus on enhancing regulations aimed at reducing emissions of methane and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the environment.

  7. Water Treatments Mass Exodus To Improved Chemical Dosing
    6/13/2017

    When first moved from water reservoirs, water contains materials that need to be treated and or removed. All microorganisms, flora and fauna waste, assorted dirt and insects all need to be dealt with before, water is fit for human consumption.  It is understood that, water needs to make many detours in its path from raw supplies to the tap.   All these detours start at the treatment plant.  At the plant water goes though applications that remove contaminants such as suspended solids, bacteria, algae, fungi, and minerals such as iron and manganese. The final objective is to turn contaminated debris choked water into safe, drinking water.

  8. How To Install pH Sensors
    3/25/2015

    This article is for those of you who need to install a new or redo an existing pH loop. These tips can help ensure accurate and consistent readings.

  9. Project Profile: Geneseo Hills EPA Demonstration Project - Arsenic Removal Geneseo, IL
    5/15/2009
    AdEdge Technologies Inc. (AdEdge) was selected in 2007 by the U.S. EPA and the host site in Round 2a Arsenic Demonstration Program to implement a turnkey arsenic treatment for the Geneseo Hills Community in Geneseo, Il. The Geneseo Hills water system is served by one well with a design flow of 200 gpm, with a backup well. By Adedge Technologies Inc.
  10. Do You Pay 300 Times What You Could For Water?
    8/15/2017

    On January 1st 2017, Philadelphia’s controversial “soda tax” went into effect, adding a 1.5-cents-per-ounce on sugary beverages sold in the city. Several cities across the U.S. have enacted similar taxes in a bid to battle diet-related diseases such as obesity and fund more healthy activities within their communities.