Regulations and Legislation Features, Insights, & Analysis

  1. City Water Treatment Processing Application
    3/12/2012
    Activated carbon (AC) filtration is most effective in removing organic contaminants from water. Organic substances are composed of two basic elements, carbon and hydrogen. Because organic chemicals are often responsible for taste, odor, and color problems, AC filtration can generally be used to improve aesthetically objectionable water as well as remove chlorine. By Schenck AccuRate
  2. Z-92®/Z-33™ Uranium-Arsenic Treatment Process - Schurz Elementary School, Nevada Case Study
    8/9/2012

    This uranium, arsenic and gross alpha removal pilot study was conducted for the Schurz Elementary School treatment facility in Schurz, Nevada. The Schurz Elementary School well contains concentrations of uranium, arsenic and gross alpha in excess of the State regulated Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL).

  3. Utilizing A Phosphate Analyzer To Monitor And Control Chemical Feed Reduces Operating Costs And Improves Reliability
    2/6/2014

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), which provides for the enhancement of the safety of public drinking water supplies through the establishment and enforcement of nationwide drinking water regulations. Congress gave the primary responsibility for establishing regulations to the U. S. EPA.   Until 1990, the EPA administered a certification process for chemicals, including phosphates, to be used for potable water treatment. By Randy C. Turner, Technical Director, Swan Analytical USA

  4. Clearing Up Misconceptions About Turbidimeter Performance And Calibration
    4/19/2018

    There is little doubt about the importance of taking turbidity readings as part of drinking water treatment. However, there are certain misperceptions about the associated requirements and procedures needed to confirm the validity of those readings. The major points of confusion seem to revolve around perception of the terms “approved,” “calibration,” and “validation.” Here is a quick synopsis on what you really need to know about meeting U.S. EPA Method 180.1: Determination of Turbidity by Nephelometry for accurate turbidity readings.

  5. Measuring pH And Its Role In Corrosion Control
    9/19/2018

    Corrosion control has always been a priority for distributing safe drinking water throughout the world’s networks of pipeline. This has become all the more critical following the outrageous lead poisoning revelations in Flint, MI — an incident caused directly by corrosion of the city’s lead-based infrastructure.

  6. How To Take Charge of Your Water Quality Analysis For Chlorine Disinfection
    5/22/2018

    The use of chlorine to treat and disinfect drinking water and wastewater has been in practice for decades, with the earliest recorded attempt dating all the way back to 1893. Since then, it has come a long way.

  7. The Role Of pH Measurement During Coagulation
    9/20/2018

    In the wastewater treatment industry, coagulation has become one of the most widespread processes for effectively separating contaminants and effluent. But coagulation is a complicated and sensitive process, one that alters the chemical balance of the wastewater in order to strip it of unwanted constituents. As in many such processes, pH plays a critical role, and treatment professionals must analyze it closely if they want to properly coagulate their product.

  8. A More Efficient Approach To EPA Stage 2 DBP Compliance
    4/20/2018

    Everyone wants pathogen-free drinking water, and adding chlorine is a great way to get it. Unfortunately, the dirtier a water treatment plant (WTP)’s raw water inflow — in terms of natural organic matter (NOM) or microbial organisms — the more disinfection byproducts (DBPs) the chlorination process will generate in the form of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Those DBPs increase the risk of non-compliance with the U.S. EPA’s Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rules. Choosing the right instrumentation to measure NOM through spectral absorption coefficients (SACs) can have a big impact on treatment strategies — in terms of both costs and compliance performance.

  9. Project Profile: Iron And Manganese Reduction, Village Of Corona, NM
    7/14/2010

    In the fall of 2008, AdEdge was selected by Village of Corona, NM to design, manufacture, and startup a water treatment system for the removal of iron and manganese. By Adedge Technologies Inc.

  10. Clari-DAF® System Provides Effective TOC Removal For Cambridge WTP
    3/9/2015

    To ensure treated water complied with the most stringent drinking water standards, including the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (State 2 DBPR), the City of Cambridge, MA, WTP decided to implement a robust multibarrier treatment solution.