Regulations and Legislation Features, Insights, & Analysis

  1. Emerging Contaminant: 1,4-Dioxane

    1,4-Dioxane is a synthetic industrial chemical which is completely miscible in water. It is highly mobile in groundwater and is not shown to be readily biodegradable in the environment.

  2. NDMA And 1,4-Dioxane Treatment - San Gabriel Valley, California (Case Study)

    Since it was first settled in 1841, California's San Gabriel Valley has hosted a wide variety of industries. However, industrial development has left a significant portion of the Valley’s groundwater contaminated with various organic contaminants, including N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and 1,4-dioxane.

  3. Treatment Of Cyanotoxins In Drinking Water With Activated Carbon

    Recently, cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins have become a high profile drinking water quality concern in both the United States and abroad. The combination of weather conditions, agricultural phosphate runoff, and other factors has produced water conditions that have favored the formation of cyanobacteria in surface water supplies.

  4. Granular Activated Carbon Removes PFOA From Drinking Water

    In the fall of 2015, a small village on the border of Vermont in New York State, tested positive for Perfluorinated Compounds (PFCs), specifically Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA), in the municipal drinking water. The influent levels of PFOA in the water were above 600 ng/L, and thus considered harmful to village residents. Realizing that PFOA was on the U.S. EPA Contaminant Candidate List, the Village solicited the services of engineering firm CT Male Associates to investigate treatment options and provide a treatment system.

  5. Emerging Contaminants: PFOS AND PFOA

    PFCS are manmade fully fluorinated compounds which are not naturally found in the environment, are used in a variety of products such as fire fighting foams, coating additives as a surface-activeagent. PFOS (perfluorooctane sulfonate) and PFOA (Perfluorooctanoic acid) are the most commonly produced PFCs, and large amounts of PFCs have been produced during past manufacturing processes and released to the air, soil and water.

  6. Emerging Contaminants: PFOS AND PFOA

    PFOS and PFOA are on the EPA’s Contaminant Candidate List 4 (CCL-4). Recently, to provide Americans with a margin of protection from exposure to PFOA and PFOS, the EPA established a health advisory with levels at 70 parts per trillion.

  7. City Water Treatment Processing Application
    Activated carbon (AC) filtration is most effective in removing organic contaminants from water. Organic substances are composed of two basic elements, carbon and hydrogen. Because organic chemicals are often responsible for taste, odor, and color problems, AC filtration can generally be used to improve aesthetically objectionable water as well as remove chlorine. By Schenck AccuRate
  8. Multi-Barrier Disinfection Strategy - New York City (Case Study)

    New York City is home to more than 8 million people, making it the most populous city in the United States. The majority of New York's drinking water is supplied by the Catskill/Delaware watershed, located approximately 100 miles outside the city. Historically, NYC has not filtered the water from this system, nor did they require any additional barriers to microbial contaminants due to the pristine nature of the watershed.

  9. Utilizing A Phosphate Analyzer To Monitor And Control Chemical Feed Reduces Operating Costs And Improves Reliability

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), which provides for the enhancement of the safety of public drinking water supplies through the establishment and enforcement of nationwide drinking water regulations. Congress gave the primary responsibility for establishing regulations to the U. S. EPA.   Until 1990, the EPA administered a certification process for chemicals, including phosphates, to be used for potable water treatment. By Randy C. Turner, Technical Director, Swan Analytical USA

  10. Z-92®/Z-33™ Uranium-Arsenic Treatment Process - Schurz Elementary School, Nevada Case Study

    This uranium, arsenic and gross alpha removal pilot study was conducted for the Schurz Elementary School treatment facility in Schurz, Nevada. The Schurz Elementary School well contains concentrations of uranium, arsenic and gross alpha in excess of the State regulated Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL).