Regulations and Legislation Features, Insights, & Analysis

  1. Utilizing A Phosphate Analyzer To Monitor And Control Chemical Feed Reduces Operating Costs And Improves Reliability
    2/6/2014

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), which provides for the enhancement of the safety of public drinking water supplies through the establishment and enforcement of nationwide drinking water regulations. Congress gave the primary responsibility for establishing regulations to the U. S. EPA.   Until 1990, the EPA administered a certification process for chemicals, including phosphates, to be used for potable water treatment. By Randy C. Turner, Technical Director, Swan Analytical USA

  2. The Benefits Of Continuous Monitoring Of Phosphate In Corrosion Control
    7/15/2016

    When Flint Michigan discontinued purchasing water from the Detroit Water Authority and began using the Flint River as their raw water source they unfortunately did not consider the potential impact on lead and copper corrosion and the impact on the public.

  3. Power Plant Water: Wanted Dead And Alive
    7/17/2017

    Water is the lifeblood of electrical power plants, whether they are water-cooled steam plants or turbine-spinning hydroelectric installations. Regardless of how the facility generates electricity, there is a growing awareness that each power plant is part of its own, unique industrial watershed — drawing water from the environment, altering its contents and temperature, releasing some to the atmosphere as steam, and returning the rest to receiving waters.

  4. Lessons Learned From Flint
    7/31/2016

    We all hope that the Flint Water Crisis – where cost-cutting measures led to the drinking water supply to become severely tainted with lead – was an isolated incident. However, it is not impossible that a similar event could happen again, especially in a similarly  desperate city with limited financial resources. Here are a few key points that should be considered to avoid repeating such a tragedy.

  5. Solving A Taste and Odor Problem Step By Step (Article)
    5/22/2014

    The City of Alliance Ohio’s water system has experienced annual Taste and Odor (T&O) events since the mid 1950’s, when the first of two reservoirs, Deer Creek Reservoir, was placed into service. Nutrient contaminants, in particular phosphorous, in the watershed accumulate in the reservoirs causing algal blooms. By Terry Keep of TrojanUV, Said Abou Abdallah of Arcadis, and Dr. Dean Reynolds, Department of Water Treatment City of Alliance, Ohio

  6. How To Install pH Sensors
    3/25/2015

    This article is for those of you who need to install a new or redo an existing pH loop. These tips can help ensure accurate and consistent readings.

  7. ORP Sensors – Are They Really The Best Thing “Since Sliced Bread”?
    12/12/2016

    There have been many publications lately that claim universal appeal of the ORP sensors and their applicability across the board. This concerns me, because the authors sometimes forget to mention some well-known practical limitations of the method, let alone the realities of water treatment applications potentially influencing the sensor performance.

  8. Carbon Adsorption & Reactivation
    8/2/2016

    Chemical, petrochemical, and oil-refining plants are process-intensive operations with regulatory requirements to protect the surrounding water and air from the effects of industrial pollution. These external demands are matched by equally compelling internal pressures to address product purification needs, find alternatives to utilizing costly fresh water in production processes, reduce the carbon footprint, and operate efficiently and profitably.

  9. The Highs And Lows Of Flow Measurement
    3/18/2014

    In Feb. 2014, the Federal Bureau of Reclamation informed central California farmers that they would receive no irrigation water from the lakes, canals, and reservoirs under the Bureau’s control due to severe drought conditions. During the previous year, the farmers were only given 20 percent of their normal allocation of water.  California officials who oversee the state’s water holdings also released information that no water will be available to the farmers for irrigation. Residential users also saw severe cuts.

  10. Howard County, Maryland Sets The Pace In Restoring Chesapeake Bay Ecosystem
    6/16/2014

    Howard County, Maryland, Bureau of Utilities recently completed the $92-million Addition No. 7 project at the Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant (LPWRP) to improve the quality of the plant’s effluent discharge and to reduce harmful nutrients reaching Chesapeake Bay. The project’s various increments took over five years to complete and incorporated innovative design solutions and state-of-the-art technologies for denitrification, aeration and disinfection. The project presents a model for Maryland’s 66 largest wastewater treatment plants and possibly procurement of municipal facilities elsewhere facing increasingly stringent regulatory changes.