Drinking Water Measurement White Papers and Case Studies

  1. Dollars And Sense: The Financial Case For Automation
    5/7/2012

    Whether it is dining out less often or putting off that new car purchase just a bit longer, it seems that doing more with less is something many of us have become accustomed to over the last few years. Consumers are not the only ones feeling the pinch. By Doug Johnson, Emerson Process Management Power & Water Solutions

  2. United Water Solves Big Data Problem With Siemens Magnetic Flow Meter Technology
    11/15/2016

    United Water, a division of the global conglomerate Suez Environement, operates regulated water systems in eight states, and provides contract services to over five million people.

  3. What Lies Within… What You Need To Know About Hardness Monitoring
    9/12/2017

    Water hardness can wreak havoc on your boilers, creating holes in tubes, eating away at the walls. To keep the hardness at bay, you’re going to need to monitor the levels of calcium and magnesium seeping into your system.  There are things you need to know to ensure that you are doing this properly. First, use an automated system to increase reaction time to hardness. Next, monitor the softeners; they are critical in keeping the system functioning. Last, learn the temperament of your individual boiler; no two are alike.  

  4. Ozone-On-Demand™ Reduces Water Treatment Cost By 20%
    11/15/2012

    Pinnacle Ozone Solutions’ new generation of smart Ozone-On-Demand (OOD™) generator and control technology can help significantly reduce the cost and complexity of ozone water treatment.

  5. Case Study: Water Supplier Ensures DBP Compliance With UV254 Organic Monitoring
    3/18/2009
    Mohawk Valley Water Authority (MVWA) is a progressive supplier of potable water. With source water from the Adirondack Mountains, MVWA works to improve on nature and provide superior water quality, always striving to meet or exceed drinking water standards. Like many other surface water sources, MVWA’s water supply is rich with natural organic matter (NOM). Unfortunately, growing research has demonstrated that NOM in water when combined with chlorine leads to the formation of potentially harmful disinfection by-products.
  6. How To Clean And Handle pH Sensors
    10/31/2017

    For a pH sensor to maintain an accurate reading, the sensor must remain clean. Specifically, the glass measuring electrode cannot become coated, and the reference electrode assembly must not become coated, plugged or otherwise contaminated by the process solution. Here’s how to clean pH sensors to ensure correct operation.

  7. A Guide To Common Applications In Water Distribution Systems
    1/1/2017

    This short guide is intended to offer guidance on some of the common problems, applications and questions that arise from using automatic control valves in water systems.

  8. Orchestrating Corrosion Control With Phosphate Analyzers
    4/18/2018

    As with so many other drinking water treatment processes, corrosion control demands a delicate balance among multiple factors. From the water-purifying chlorine that increases corrosion risk, to alternative strategies that reduce corrosion — using either elevated pH or phosphates — keeping corrosion under control requires sound strategy and reliable execution. Here are several approaches to addressing those conditions, along with options for better, more effective corrosion control.

  9. U Of I Urbana-Champaign Implements Remote Monitoring System
    8/23/2017

    The Utility Distribution team at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign manage the water system which serves the entire campus. The University purchases water from Illinois American Water which is distributed across the campus for uses as diverse as chemistry labs, agricultural research, and competitive swimming complexes.

  10. Utilizing A Phosphate Analyzer To Monitor And Control Chemical Feed Reduces Operating Costs And Improves Reliability
    2/6/2014

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), which provides for the enhancement of the safety of public drinking water supplies through the establishment and enforcement of nationwide drinking water regulations. Congress gave the primary responsibility for establishing regulations to the U. S. EPA.   Until 1990, the EPA administered a certification process for chemicals, including phosphates, to be used for potable water treatment. By Randy C. Turner, Technical Director, Swan Analytical USA