Drinking Water Distribution White Papers and Case Studies

  1. Thanks To Digital Upgrade, Castle Rock’s Asset Management Becomes Model For State
    6/19/2014

    With a population of 55,000, the town of Castle Rock, Colorado, was named to “Money” magazine’s list of 100 Best Places to Live in America. It’s also a town on the cutting edge of managing its water, wastewater and storm water system assets with the help of the Hydrant and Valve Inspector from AMERICAN Flow Control (AFC) and Trimble Navigation.

  2. The Product Of Choice For Birmingham Water Works’ 4000 Miles Of Pipe
    12/15/2015

    The Birmingham Water Works Board is the largest water utility in the state of Alabama, providing water to approximately 600,000 people across the Greater Birmingham area. Its service area is about 759 square miles and contains about 4,000 miles of pipe.

  3. Constructing A Winding Box Culvert Channel In A Steep, Rocky Canyon
    4/3/2014

    Special precast box culverts were used for one of the most significant segments of the $25.8 million emergency water restoration project, designated by the NRCS, known as the Cache Water Restoration Project (CWRP). The CWRP project involved the reconstruction and improvement of approximately six miles of mostly open, unlined channels that make up the Logan and Northern, as well as the Hyde Park and Smithfield canals. The project incorporated new precast pipeline, box culverts, a section of pressurized pipe, metering systems, turn-outs, head gates, and improved maintenance access.

  4. A Sound Approach To Evaluating NRW Loss And Aging Pipelines
    5/18/2018

    As water distribution infrastructure ages, the potential for leaks grows and the need for condition-driven asset management increases proportionally. As with so many other aspects of water operations, planning ahead is key. Good system diagnosis using noninvasive procedures provides an accurate and cost-effective assessment of distribution system integrity, just as noninvasive monitoring of heartbeat, pulse, and blood pressure plays an important role in human health.

  5. Increase Revenue With New Commercial Metering Technology
    4/10/2017

    Revenue for water utilities is circling the drain. Most commercial water meters can stand up to the high water flow of commercial water customers, but these same meters often have a hard time measuring low water flows and retaining accurate meter reads over time and continuous flow conditions. Grocery stores, for example, do not pay for the scant amount of water used for produce misters because it passes through many commercial water meters without detection. These low flows add up to big dollars and are forcing water utilities to take a hard look at the accuracy of their meter fleet.

  6. Using Earth Observation Data To Identify Areas Of Infrastructure At Risk Of Failure And Intelligently Deploy Ground-Based Detection Devices
    7/27/2018

    Henry County Water Authority in Georgia, USA, had been relying on acoustic leak detection for eleven years, working with a dedicated leak detection company that uses noise  loggers and other acoustic listening devices to find leaks. However, these traditional ground-based methods of monitoring Henry County’s extensive water catchments and infrastructure have their limitations.

  7. Using AMERICAN Products, Champlain, NY, Prepares For Business Boom Near US/Canadian Border
    3/31/2017

    A key driver of economic development is the availability of water and wastewater services. For the Town and Village of Champlain, NY, this is no exception. To capitalize on the region’s economic potential and make more land available for new businesses, the Town and Village of Champlain are working together on the Shared Water Project, a major water system upgrade that includes installing 44,000 feet of AMERICAN ductile iron pipe.

  8. Hydro-Guard Advanced Flushing System Simplifies Operations, Increases Water Quality And Saves Treatment Expenses
    4/24/2014

    Birmingham Water Works Board (BWWB), Birmingham, Alabama has consistently achieved the rating of the number five water system in the United States for water quality.  BWWB’s potable water distribution system (WDS) serves 600,000 people with a daily average use of 100 million gallons (378 million liters) of water, received from nearby lakes and rivers. The system includes 51 water storage tanks, nearly 4,000 miles (6,437 km) of pipe, over 13,000 fire hydrants and over 200,000 service connections.

  9. Veteran Potable Water Superintendent Sees Benefits Of Secondary Containment Equipment To Help Enable Use Of Chlorine Gas For Chlorination
    12/27/2017

    A veteran potable water production and treatment superintendent, currently overseeing potable water needs for a federal reservation, reports significant benefit from the availability of secondary containment equipment for chlorine gas storage, as part of a management strategy to help enable the use of that chlorination method. 

  10. Why Water Infrastructure Should Be The Priority
    9/19/2016

    This article is in support of the Imagine a Day Without Water campaign — a national online movement to raise awareness about the value of water and water infrastructure. See more articles on AMERICAN’s Imagine a Day Without Water home page.