Drinking Water Analysis Case Studies

  1. Monitoring Lead In School Drinking Water
    5/23/2016

    The EPA’s guidance documentation “3T’s for Reducing Lead in Drinking Water in Schools and Child Care Facilities: Training, Testing, Telling” recommends for schools to routinely test their facility’s drinking water, with a focus on lead levels in drinking water fountains.

  2. Retrofit Membrane System Treats High Turbidity Water
    10/6/2015

    The City of Wilmington, Delaware is situated where the Christina River and the Brandywine Creek flow into the Delaware River.

  3. High Turbidity Water Treatment Reached With Mobile Water System
    10/6/2015

    Starting in 2010, the drinking water plant in Wellsboro, PA, began experiencing high turbidity and algae in the water which caused emergency notices for citizens to boil their water before use.

  4. The Most Misunderstood Fact Behind Dissolved Oxygen Sensors (It’s The Pressure, Not The Concentration)
    8/5/2015

    A dissolved oxygen sensor ought to be simple to understand. Whether it is membrane or optically based, it gives a signal that is proportional to the concentration of oxygen concentration in water.

  5. Lightning Fast Response Prevents Extended Down Time
    7/29/2015

    The City of Gordon Texas’s drinking water facility was struck by lightning. Thinking long term, and desiring the latest technology available, the City took this opportunity to upgrade their on-line instrumentation with a range of new continuous monitoring on-line instruments including chlorine analyzers, pH monitoring, temperature monitoring, and turbidity monitoring.

  6. Turbiwell Comparision Report Before And After Upgrade
    7/29/2015

    Russellville water treatment plant is a surface water plant using traditional clarification, filtration, and treatment. The plant historically has used traditional contact turbidimeters that employ tungsten lamps that required quarterly maintenance, but replaced their turbidimeters with Swan Turbiwell turbidimeters in 2012. Read the full report for a comparison of the performance of the Swan Turbiwell to the previously installed turbidimeters. 

  7. Utah Water District Saves Time And Resources, Improves Accuracy By Upgrading Sensors And Analyzers
    7/20/2015

    Monitoring chlorine and fluoride levels in the drinking water of Utah’s Taylorsville-Bennion Improvement District used to be expensive, labor intensive, and often sensitive to interference from the vari­able frequency drives used to operate the chlorine injection pumps. That is, until the district upgraded to Rosemount free chlorine and fluoride sen­sors and analyzers from Emerson.

  8. Chloramination Monitoring And Control
    7/15/2015

    Since the EPA has established that, together with free chlorine, monochloramine is a primary disinfectant, it has been possible to implement the process more intensively. Water that is treated with monochloramine has, depending on the source of the water, fewer problems concerning taste and odor than water treated with free chlorine. In addition, the chemically more stable monochloramine remains longer in the water, thus allowing a long-term disinfecting effect.

  9. Continuous Analyzer Integrated Data Validation
    5/28/2015

    Continuous analyzers are an integral part of the process to maintain quality, ensure compliance, and protect public health. Therefore it is imperative to ensure the analyzers are functioning properly and provide accurate and reliable data. This requires validation of the data provided by the analyzer on a routine basis. In addition some continuous analyzers incorporate internal data validation capabilities to inform the end user the reliability of the data provided by the analyzer. This paper discusses integrated data validation and how they may be integrated into SCADA systems.

  10. Chicago Suburb Ensures Highest Water Quality Year-Round, Saves On Labor And Reagents With New Chlorine Analyzers
    5/18/2015

    For the Village of Lombard’s Water Division, consistently delivering high-quality tap water to the community’s nearly 44,000 residents and the businesses serving them was once quite a juggling act: constantly fixing old, temperamental analyzers; feeding reagents into the old analyzers; and staying ahead of callers complaining about “musty” water tastes and odors. Not today.