WATER INDUSTRY FEATURES, INSIGHTS, AND ANALYSIS

  • Bushfires Threaten Drinking Water Safety. The Consequences Could Last For Decades

    Bushfires pose serious short- and long-term impacts to public drinking water quality. They can damage water supply infrastructure and water catchments, impeding the treatment processes that normally make our water safe to drink. Several areas in New South Wales and Victoria have already been issued with warnings about the quality of their drinking water. Here’s what we know about the short- and long-term risks.

  • Understanding PFAS’ Impact On Remediation Strategies

    For more than 16.5 million water-utility customers in 33 different states, contamination caused by per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) is a source-water issue that will not go away for a long time. What are the practical options for community water systems currently confronting this challenge? Here is an overview of several treatments and their relative successes against a wide variety of PFAS compounds.

  • EPA Continues To Update Its Environmental Sampling And Analytical Methods (ESAM) Program

    EPA’s Homeland Security Research Program (HSRP) aims to increase the United States’ capabilities to prepare for and respond to environmental disasters involving chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear substances (CBRN). As part of this effort, EPA researchers develop scientific data, methods, and tools that can be used by various stakeholders, including laboratories and on-scene coordinators, to increase the effectiveness of response.

  • Nutrient Sensor Action Challenge Winners: Data And Decisions To Manage Excess Nutrients

    Nutrients in the environment from excess nitrogen and phosphorous can result in negative impacts on water quality. EPA is improving nutrient management by incentivizing the development of low-cost technology solutions, such as nutrient sensors, in collaboration with USGS, USDA, NIST, NOAA, and the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS).

  • WRF Hosts Capitol Hill, State-Of-The-Science Briefing On Harmful Algal Blooms

    To make informed decisions about how to limit exposure to cyanotoxins, utilities need information to select and implement a comprehensive and technically sound management approach. The Water Research Foundation (WRF) has been actively involved in developing effective innovative solutions to help utilities address this challenge and protect public health.

  • How Giving Legal Rights To Nature Could Help Reduce Toxic Algae Blooms In Lake Erie

    August and September are peak months for harmful blooms of algae in western Lake Erie. This year’s outbreak covered more than 620 square miles by mid-August. These blooms, which can kill fish and pets and threaten public health, are driven mainly by agricultural pollution and increasingly warm waters due to climate change.

  • Are We Really Protecting Rivers And Streams From Pollution? It’s Hard To Say, And That’s A Problem

    More public and private resources than ever are being directed to protecting and preserving aquatic ecosystems and watersheds. Whether mandated for land development, farming, or in response to the growing severity and number of natural disasters, scientists from Drexel University found evidence that decades of watershed restoration and mitigation projects have taken place, but their impact is mostly perceived.

  • A Messy Problem Inspires An Award-Winning Solution

    Denver Water and engineering partners resolve major water quality challenge in crucial South Platte River exchange reservoirs.

  • Drinking Water Challenges On The Rise

    University of Miami professors who study water treatment and civil engineering say that water contamination issues point to human error.

  • Denver Water Proposes Innovative Plan To Remove An Estimated 75,000 Lead Service Lines In 15 Years

    Recently, Denver Water’s board approved its proposed “Lead Reduction Program Plan” to fully replace the estimated 75,000 lead service lines (LSLs) in their system within 15 years. The plan is an innovative solution that will remove the primary source of lead within Denver Water’s system, while avoiding the use of orthophosphate that can further exacerbate nutrient pollution problems in rivers, streams, and oceans.

DRINKING WATER PRODUCTS

Containerized seawater desalination solutions ensure water availability in a wide range of applications.

NeoTech Aqua Solutions provides the most efficient and cost-effective UV systems for destroying Total Organic Carbons (TOC’s) in water.  Whether your destroying NDMA, 1,4-dioxane, TCE, MTBE, urea, endocrine disruptors or other organics, only NeoTech Aqua provides ultraviolet TOC reduction with a treatment chamber optimized for low pressure mercury lamps.  As a result, NeoTech Aqua’s UV systems achieve a three times greater TOC reduction per kilowatt compared to standard UV systems, reducing our clients’ costs and energy consumption. In addition to efficiently generating ample 185 nm UV for TOC reduction, NeoTech Aqua’s TOC reduction systems also generate significant levels of 254 nm UV which serve as a powerful disinfectant, providing you both TOC-free and organism-free product water.

Anaerobic digestion processes that radically improve the quality of wastewater while delivering green energy extracted from biological waste streams are emerging as a profitable way for agricultural and food processing industries cope with the twin impact of drought and pollution challenges.

AdEdge-ROTEC’s Flow Reversal technology is designed to be implemented in new and existing reverse osmosis desalination facilities for water purification, brackish water, process water, and other industrial applications. This high recovery technology addresses concerns often associated with desalination and enables significant system performance improvements, leading to higher profitability, reduced operating costs, and a lower environmental impact.

The HYDREX™ range includes both organic and inorganic chemicals formulated to meet the specifications of customers in the industrial and municipal sectors including effluent and sludge treatment.

Reverse Osmosis uses a semi-permeable spiral wound element to remove up to 99% of dissolved solids and bacteria from the feed water source

VIEWS ON THE LATEST REGS

  • Preparing To Tackle The Hydra Of LCR Revisions

    As a journalist serving the water industry — but not yet a seasoned technical veteran — I attended a recent Lead In Drinking Water Forum sponsored by AWWA NJ to learn about the challenges of complying with the proposed Lead and Copper Rule Revisions (LCRR). What I heard impressed upon me the technical, administrative, and logistical challenges of delivering safe, lead-free drinking water all the way to user taps. Here are my takeaways.

  • New RO And Other Techniques Lead To Improved Performance

    For water utilities facing various water contamination issues, there is no single catch-all treatment. That is why in this recent Water Talk interview Ronit Erlitzki and Doug Craver of AdEdge Water Technologies share treatment options that can be used alone or in combination to address diverse challenges. They introduce a new reverse osmosis (RO) treatment technique capable of raising recovery rates by 20 percent and reducing concentrate volume up to 70 percent vs. conventional RO (depending on water quality). They also explore biological processes for removing nitrate, VOC, ammonia, etc. and treating high brine concentrations in wastewater, plus techniques for resolving ammonia problems in water with high TOC concentrations.

  • Forward-Looking Technology Anticipates Compliance Needs

    When a company stakes its reputation on delivering innovative technologies, products, and services, the specter of a changing regulatory landscape is considered more an opportunity than an obstacle. In this Water Talk interview, Mirka Wilderer, CEO of De Nora Water Technologies, discusses varying topics such as pharmaceuticals and nutrients in wastewater, the synergy of the company’s new MIOX and Neptune acquisitions, and how to address the growing concern over chlorate disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water. For example, De Nora’s new ClorTec Gen III onsite hypochlorite generators generate up to 3,000 lbs./day of chlorine-based disinfectants while reducing chlorate formation and cutting operating costs by 15 percent as compared to previously available models.

  • Satisfying LCR Compliance Measurement And Management

    The challenges of complying with the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) and other emerging regulations in a post-Flint world are high-priority for a variety of organizations — from government agencies, to public water systems, to individual facilities such as schools. This Water Talk discussion with Megan Glover of 120 Water Audit addresses the scope and execution of those challenges. It covers everything from providing point-of-use testing kits for sampling individual water spigots to managing overall Safe Drinking Water Act and LCR compliance through cloud-based software. Most important, it gives context to practical solutions for the many utilities and facilities coping with some level of lead exceedance.

  • The Mainstreaming Of Potable Reuse

    With ever-growing demand for water resources, the reuse discussion has been building for years. More utilities are considering it, policy is being created around it, and new technologies are making it more efficient. To better understand the evolving landscape, Water Talk sat down with Brown and Caldwell's regional One Water leader, Allegra da Silva.

MORE WATER INDUSTRY FEATURES

  • Seal The Deal: Shielding Against A Mag Meter’s Achilles Heel

    When it comes to metering water flow — drinking water or wastewater — full-bore mag meters offer many advantages. While the underlying technology based on Faraday’s Law of electromagnetic induction is shared among all styles of full-bore mag meters, specific implementations have impacts on longevity and accuracy. Here is what to look for when the time to choose arrives.

  • Achieving Higher Flow Rates And Smaller System Footprints For Iron Removal With Manganese Dioxide Filter Media

    Traditional processes used to remove iron and manganese from groundwater have commonly included oxidation with chlorine followed by a filter with sand or other media.

  • X-Ray Inspection Provides Product Safety For Ice Cream Production Lines

    To further reinforce positive customer experiences, an ice cream manufacturer challenged themselves to further minimize its already small risk of foreign body contamination by implementing x-ray inspection.

  • Choosing The Right Water Disinfection

    In the mid-to-late 1800s, chlorine had been used sporadically to help control infection in hospitals and drinking water. Common water treatment did not start in the U.S. until the early twentieth century when increasing cases of waterborne illnesses prompted many large cities to begin large scale filtration of water supplies.

  • How To Structure Utility Data For Improved Efficiency

    With a growing effort to ‘go digital’ in the global water industry, distribution and wastewater managers risk data inundation. But data sources from SCADA systems, pressure loggers, and stand-alone sensors can unlock valuable insights for more efficient operations and maintenance. Learn how to structure your system  to avoid data flooding.

  • Rideshare: Taking Clinical Research By Storm

    The new age transportation method, Rideshare, is growing in popularity amongst everyday travelers, but has also been found to provide significant advantages for clinical trials. This blog outlines ten Benefits of utilizing Rideshare through an expert provider in clinical workflow optimization.

  • Climate Change And Nutrients: Forewarned Is Forearmed

    Rising temperatures and precipitation combined with increasing nutrient runoff from human activity are elevating challenges in water treatment efforts. In some cases, that means increased threats to drinking water quality. In others, it means increasingly stringent nutrient discharge levels. Either way, taking the nutrient monitoring battle out to the field can help in waging a better fight at the treatment plant.

  • Harmful Algal Bloom Threats To Potable Water: Establishing Resilience

    Changing climate and other environmental conditions are intensifying the frequency and severity of harmful algal blooms (HABs). Here are important guidelines to understanding HAB causes and impacts to potable water treatment plants — including dealing with the algal biomass, remnants of decaying algal cells, and especially the secondary metabolites that the algae produce, such as taste and odor compounds and toxins.

  • SPRWS Upgrades To Corrosion-Resistant Zinc-Coated Ductile Iron Water Main

    It is no secret that a large portion of the drinking water infrastructure in the United States is near or past its intended design life. Our nation’s water infrastructure needs an overhaul, and the cost of doing so is climbing rapidly. The American Society of Civil Engineering’s 2017 Infrastructure Report Card graded the nation’s drinking water infrastructure a D. According to the American Water Works Association, an estimated $1 trillion is necessary to maintain and expand drinking water service to meet demands over the next 25 years.

  • Meeting Food Retailers’ Requirements Through X-Ray Inspection

    Food regulations are deepening and so is the authority regulators have in the marketplace. However, the right X-ray inspection system can help you achieve compliance and exceed retailer requirements.

  • Flow Chemistry vs. Batch Processes

    Traditionally, new chemicals are developed using batch processing, which fully relies on versatile and qualified equipment to perform different unit operations. To address these challenges, continuous flow chemistry technology is emerging as an effective tool to conduct chemical synthesis.

  • What to Look For When Selecting An Investigator Payment Solution

    Many times sponsors go with a site payment solution they thought would work - only to find out the "automation" is not so automatic - that customer support is outsourced, spreadsheets still need to be emailed back and forth and sites are still calling asking questions. Following is a list of things to consider when choosing to implement investigator payment technology to avoid this situation.

  • How To Scale-Up Lentiviral Vector Production Part 2: Considerations For Downstream Processing

    Lentiviral vectors (LVV) are a key component in the production of cell and gene therapies. Today, even with the proliferation of cell and gene therapies in development, LVV is still produced using legacy methods employed in basic research. Overcoming technical challenges in the scale-up of LVV production is a major focus for the industry. Here we break down DSP into unit operations and understand how process innovations are contributing to scalability at each step.

  • Chlorate DBPs: Future-Proofing Water Disinfection For Chlorate Regulation

    Chlorate is a highly oxidized form of chlorine that can be introduced to a water source as an industrial or agricultural contaminant or into a finished water as a disinfection byproduct (DBP). As a DBP, chlorate can result from water disinfection with bulk sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, or hypochlorite formed through electrochlorination (EC) systems.

  • Using Advanced Tools To Stem The Lost Revenue Tide

    From the largest metropolitan utilities to the smallest water systems, leaks are a problem everywhere. Because it’s difficult to raise consumer prices to offset the losses, non-revenue water has a direct impact on the bottom line of municipal water systems. However, utility managers now have an opportunity to reverse the problem with advanced flow meter technology that combines multiple measurements.

  • A Modern Approach To Modular Plant Design

    Providing water services to private developments and small rural communities has always been a challenge. The cost of running pipe and installing pump stations across long distances can make or break a project and mean the difference in being able to offer affordable, high-quality drinking water and wastewater treatment.

  • The Differences Between UV AOP & Granular Activated Carbon For Contaminant Treatment (Article)

    Providing safe drinking water is a growing challenge. While methods for the disinfection of bacteria, protozoa and viruses in drinking water are well established, there are certain chemical contaminants of concern resistant to traditional water treatment methods which are being detected in drinking water, and many have the potential to impact public health.

  • Ready Or Not? A Checklist For Building Natural Disaster Resilience

    You’ve seen the headlines, read the case studies, taken stock of your resilience plan (or lack thereof), and posed the question “What now?” Here are a dozen ways battery-powered wireless recorders and transmitters can support a new Resiliency Master Plan for your utility and your community — one that can provide cost-saving and even life-saving insights under extreme conditions.